snubbr.com

Will a polarizer bring out details in clouds?
I was at my Son's football practice last night and noticed some interesting clouds. When I took my sunglasses off, much of the detail went away. My glasses are NOT polarized but they are very dark. Would a polarizer help bring these details out in a photo?.

Thanks,John..

Comments (8)

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds that are side-lit by the sun may get some nice definition on some parts of their puffy shapes. Any cloud in the correct region of the sky (relative to a bright sun) might get enhanced contrast since the sky will appear a deeper blue..

Http://halley.cc/photo/filters.html.

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #1

I have actually taken pictures through my yellowish sunglasses and the clouds look amazing. The same clouds without the "filter" weren't as interesting. Someday, I hope to try many different filters to see the differences...

Comment #2

JohnnyB2 wrote:.

I was at my Son's football practice last night and noticed someinteresting clouds. When I took my sunglasses off, much of the detailwent away. My glasses are NOT polarized but they are very dark. Woulda polarizer help bring these details out in a photo?.

The #1 cause of loss of cloud detail is overexposure. Most cameras are "smart" enough to detect that part of the scene is sky, and expose for the ground, resulting in severe overexposure of the sky. To avoid this, include only sky in the image..

As for color filtration (like the yellow sunglasses), that really only works when making black and white images. Try this: take the image normally in color with no filter. Back at your computer, adjust the image to make it yellow or red, then convert to b&w...

Comment #3

Since CPL controlls polarized light amount and light that passes through micro drops in clouds is polaraized - you will get better detail..

Rotate frontal element of filter till desired effect. Lock exposure from most bright point in clouds to avoid overexposure..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #4

You can do much of the same with clouds in post production. For example, no polarizers or ND Grads used in these shots. I do love ND grads though. Just didn't have them at the time..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Neutral Density Graduated filters have various shades of neutral density gray on one end and clear on the other end. You put the filter such that the border in on the horizon or whereever you wish. A 3 stop ND grad would then allow the foreground to be exposed normally and the sky to be underexposed by three stops. This does amazing things with your image.Cheers, Craig..

Comment #5

Is how polarizing filters work and what they do. All a polarizing filter does is reduce glare. Think of a PF as a Venetian blind on a window (the blinds made up of wooden or plastic slats that can be opened and closed by pulling on a cord).

When in use, the slats let in more or less light depending on how the slats are set. Only the light that is coming in at the exactly correct angle can get thru and light your room. It's the same with PFs, only the light coming in at the angle the PF is set for will get thru. So, any light coming at you at an even slightly different angle (and which your eye and camera would interpret as glare) would be eliminated. So the detail, from the 'perfectly' angled light would be more likely to show up as detail rather than glare. (Did you ever notice on a cloudy day, colors in the world around you seem deeper and purer? That's because there is less white light glare diluting the colors you are seeing).

As you might expect, camera position becomes very important since we can't adjust the angle of the PFs 'slats'. By shifting position a few yards/meters to the left or right different rays of light become the rays that will get thru or get filtered out and this may affect which details you are likely to record and just how interesting your cloud photos will be.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington.

And my non Photo blog:http://blog.360.yahoo.com/blog-Qe0Iq3g2d6ML3IynXl.Q2i5CPe6UaA?cq=1..

Comment #6

You can always try one of the many free utilities available to experimentwith some further fine tuning such as Picasa and Noisware as an example..

Original shot of a cloud I found interesting..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Cloud image converted to B&W in Picasa and then over to Noiseware toremove a little of the noise..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

By no means professional, I still find that you can have a lot of fun with these little utilities..

Image taken with a Panasonic FZ7..

Kim.

Shoot first and ask questions later!..

Comment #7

The polarizor will often make the sky and clouds 'pop' and some underexposure (you could say proper exposure) will make them appear even more dramatic. The diffculty in doing that is getting the foreground of the photo to be properly exposed. Grad filters can come in handy for that but are limited by the need for a somewhat straight horizon and good ones are quite expensive. My choice is to take two exposures on a tripod for blending in Photoshop. Some prefer to use HDR but I often see people get carried away and make the clouds and the entire photo look completely unrealsitic and fake. But it's not like there's actually any rules we have to follow so I am not criticizing them. I admit to occasionally underexposing the sky and clouds to a point where they are not quite what my eyes saw but does look very dramatic...

Comment #8

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.