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Wide Screen Lap Top Makes Photos Too Wide When Viewing
How can I change the aspect ration of my wide screen lap top computer to view my digital photos in same aspect ratio format they were taken?.

When I transfer my photos to the wide screen lap top, the photos are too wide and therefore, they are not in the same aspect ratio as they were when they were taken with the camera. It makes editing difficult. I have a standard monitor on my desktop and have no problems with the photos being too wide, the problem is only with the wide screen monitor..

I have XP installed in the lap top and have used Windows Picture and Fax Viewer, Adobe Photoshop Elements 4.0, as well as, Picasa2 to view and edit my photos and they all display them in the wide aspect ratio. I would like to change the setting on my computer monitor to non-wide screen, but all my computer friends have not been able to help. In fact, some don't even recognize that the photos are too wide..

I'm sure the folks on this site have had the same problem and have solved it. So, what do I need to do?.

Thanks,Wes.

-.

'It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into'..

Jonathan Swift..

Comments (13)

Just don't edit your photos in full screen. Downsize the window so aspect ratio is kept. Otherwise change your resolution to something like 1280X1024 to maintain a closer 4:3 ratio. To do this right click the background go to properties, then the settings tab. move the slider bar that says screen resolution until it reads 1280 by 1024...

Comment #1

If the monitor is set to it's native resolution it shouldn't be a problem. Sounds like your XP settings are stretching the pixels to a non-native resolution. A pixel is a pixel and viewing a photo on a wide screen makes absolotely no difference in the aspect ratio of the photo...

Comment #2

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

If the monitor is set to it's native resolution it shouldn't be aproblem. Sounds like your XP settings are stretching the pixels to anon-native resolution. A pixel is a pixel and viewing a photo on awide screen makes absolotely no difference in the aspect ratio of thephoto..

That sounds like the right explanation. XP needs to be set to agree with the actual monitor pixel dimensions. If XP is trying to fit a 4:3 resolution, such as 1024 x 768 onto a wide screen, everything will be stretched. The native resolution will be documented in the specifications somewhere, perhaps 1280 x 800 which is a ratio of 16:10, or something similar.Regards,Peter..

Comment #3

Unless your widescreen laptop is setup to use a normal resolution, I dont understand how it can be stretching your images...

Comment #4

Habib_15 wrote:.

Just don't edit your photos in full screen. Downsize the window soaspect ratio is kept. Otherwise change your resolution to somethinglike 1280X1024 to maintain a closer 4:3 ratio. To do this right clickthe background go to properties, then the settings tab. move theslider bar that says screen resolution until it reads 1280 by 1024..

I don't think this is right. See my post below in response to the OP..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

Wrahn wrote:.

I'm sure the folks on this site have had the same problem and havesolved it..

Actually no - sorry : ).

So, what do I need to do?.

Well, I use Photoshop Elements 4 on a wide screen laptop and Ive never had a problem. Im no expert, but heres how I think it works..

Your monitor has a sort of built in or native resolution and aspect ratio, which corresponds to the physical characteristics of the monitor..

For a square (4:3) monitor this might be, for example, 1024x768. For a wide screen it would typically be something like 1280x720 (aspect ratio = 1:1.7777)..

Now, you can tell the operating system what size/shape is your monitor, by- right click on the desktop- select Properties- Click on the Settings tab.

- Move the screen resolution slider back and forth to select from a variety of predetermined options - its like using P mode on your camera : ).

The application (eg Photoshop) knows nothing of this - it simply puts out a screen image that the operating system then translates on to your monitor using the above setting..

So, if you get the setting wrong, the image from your software will be distorted. If you get the setting right (aspect ratio), everything will look just fine..

So my guess is that you have somehow managed to set your monitor settings to something other than the native or default setting, and in particular with a different aspect ratio than that of your (physical) screen..

I suggest you have a look at the Properties of your monitor, as described above..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #6

The best way is to refer back to your laptop manuals and find what is the native resolution of your laptop screen as suggested by Peter..

Then go to your display properties and set the resolution to match your laptop screen resolution. This should solve the problem..

Chang..

Comment #7

Thanks to all for the input..

Here's what I've learned so far about my laptop and my photos. The laptop has a screen size of 13 x 8.125 and the photos I took with My Pana DMC-FZ8 are.

3074 x 2304 resolution and taken in the 4:3 format (aspect ratio) at the 7 M setting. In the manual for the camera, it indicates this format (aspect ratio) is the same as a 4:3 TV or computer monitor. When I view them on my almost 4:3 desktop computor monitor they look normal. When I view them on my laptop wide screen monitor they look like the people in them have gained weight..

When I compare the ratio of photo resolution 3074 x 2304 to computer display resolution settings, I find that my laptop has two setting that have the same ratio: 1024 x 768 and 800 x 600, however the photos still appear to be too wide. I believe somehow I'm getting photo resolution confused with the aspect ratio of the photo and aspect ratio of the screen size..

To change direction slightly and talk about TV monitor ratios, I have two TVs that are HD and of course wide screen. If I view a HD wide screen show, the picture fills the screen, but when I view a normal show (non-wide screen) I get the black vertical bars on the side. This is because the aspect ratio is different for the wide screen and the normal broadcast. I can do what many friends do with the normal show and use the controls to stretch the picture to fill the wide screen. Of course, the people automatically put on about 50 pounds; the picture is not normal. Well, that's what I'm seeing with my photos using my laptop..

Somehow I'm missing something, because I know what I see on the laptop and the photos are stretched in the 1024 x 768 and 800 x 600 settings, but on my almost 4:3 desktop they appear normal. Based on that, I use the desktop to edit my photos, but it would be nice to be able to take my laotop on the road to use it to present slideshows. Of course, my friends might be are happy if I don't. The almost 4:3 desktop comment is based on a desktop monitor that is 14.125 x 11.250 which is not a true 4:3 aspect ratio, but it's closer than my laptop's 13 x 8.125..

After I edit my photos, I then make DVD slideshow of the photos with titles and sound. When I view them on a 4:3 TV the photos fill the screen except for the one taken in potrait mode. When I view my DVD on my wide-screen TV I get the vertical line on each side..

So, where has my thinking gone in the wrong direction about my laptop?.

Thanks,Wes.

'It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into'..

Jonathan Swift..

Comment #8

Wrahn wrote:snip....

After I edit my photos, I then make DVD slideshow of the photos withtitles and sound. When I view them on a 4:3 TV the photos fill thescreen except for the one taken in potrait mode. When I view my DVDon my wide-screen TV I get the vertical line on each side..

So, where has my thinking gone in the wrong direction about my laptop?.

Your monitor is presently set to the wrong resolution. It needs to be set to it's NATIVE **widescreen**resolution (whatever that is)..

Check your documentation to see which (two) figures to use. Presently your greater figure is NOT high enough by comparison with the lesser. (see below).

We know it cannot be either 1024 x 768 or 800 x 600, because they are both 4:3 ratios... so naturally they are wrong when used on a WIDE-screen monitor. The horizontal pixels are too few, so, the few that there are, HAVE to be s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d sideways in order to fill the screen....

...and that is why you have a problem!! .

In between times, forget about the shape and pixel count of your actual pictures. This is of no concern at any stage, and is just serving to confuse you at this point. Your pictures will automatically be displayed in their correct proportions WHEN the Operating System is supplying an adequate number of pixels to fill the FULL width of the wider screen, and does so without stretching/distorting them..

Is this clear?Regards,Baz..

Comment #9

Wrahn wrote:.

To change direction slightly and talk about TV monitor ratios, I havetwo TVs that are HD and of course wide screen. If I view a HD widescreen show, the picture fills the screen, but when I view a normalshow (non-wide screen) I get the black vertical bars on the side.This is because the aspect ratio is different for the wide screen andthe normal broadcast..

You need to do the same with the laptop, you should have black vertical bars each side when viewing the 4:3 pictures. (Or whatever colour you set for the background)..

The measurements you quoted confirm that the laptop screen has an aspect ratio of 16:10, which is what I suggested previously. So all you need to do is set the laptop screen resolution to a setting that is also 16:10 (for example 1280 x 800).Regards,Peter..

Comment #10

Especially this bit:.

Barrie Davis wrote:.

...In between times, forget about the shape and pixel count of youractual pictures. This is of no concern at any stage, and is justserving to confuse you at this point. Your pictures willautomatically be displayed in their correct proportions WHEN theOperating System is supplying an adequate number of pixels to fillthe FULL width of the wider screen, and does so withoutstretching/distorting them..

You need to take this one step at a time. Forget about TVs and DVDs etc - we'll tackle them separately (I know from personal experience how tricky that can be!)..

The first thing is - as Barrie has said - you do not set the resolution or aspect ratio of your monitor to match the image files, or a TV, or a DVD. You set the monitor to it's NATIVE resolution. That way your editing and viewing software will give the right results..

Your monitor settings have nothing to do with how the image is presented on a TV (well, almost nothing but let's leave that until later) and nothing to do with the format of a DVD you might produce. That's a separate issue..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #11

Thanks! Thanks! Thanks!.

My problem is fixed changing to 1280 x 800 did the trick. I don't understand the logic of it all, and I never did determine what the native resolution of the HP laptop was, so I just followed the advice I received from all you good folks..

It now works the way it should using the different programs..

Thanks to all,Wes.

'It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into'..

Jonathan Swift..

Comment #12

Wrahn wrote:.

Thanks! Thanks! Thanks!.

My problem is fixed changing to 1280 x 800 did the trick. I don'tunderstand the logic of it all, and I never did determine what thenative resolution of the HP laptop was, so I just followed the adviceI received from all you good folks..

It now works the way it should using the different programs..

Good! Glad you got it sorted. Neither should you need to do anything new to continue using your other software and display devices (TV etc.) as before..

Note: To CHECK that the operating resolution is now set exactly right for your screen width and height, it might be worth running up Adobe Photoshop, and drawing a "test" circle with an automatic tool..

If you want to do this, [just to make sure] here's how......

1) Run up Photoshop, and create a 'New' document from the 'File' menu. Just for the hell of it, you could make it a 1280 x 800 one, eh? Your new doc would then have the same widescreen style aspect ratio as your laptop screen itself. .

2) Then click on the 'Shape' tool (next to the 'Pen' tool) and select 'Ellipse' mode from the pop-out menu..

3) With 'Shift' held down, drag an ellipse into your new document. (Shift constrains the tool to produce a "numerically" accurate circle of equal pixels in width and height.).

4) If the circle is NOT perfectly circular as it appears on screen, but looks "squashed" or elliptical.....

...... then get back here and we'll see what we can do about it ... okay?.

Here's hoping further adjustment is not necessary. Regards,Baz..

Comment #13

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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