snubbr.com

why does this happen?
I am not sure why this happens when I try to take a picture without flash. I get the reflection of the candles. I would appreciate it if sumone can tell me what I am doing wrong and how to avoid this. Thank you.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comments (11)

Funkymunky wrote:.

I am not sure why this happens when I try to take a picture withoutflash. I get the reflection of the candles. I would appreciate it ifsumone can tell me what I am doing wrong and how to avoid this. Thankyou.

You, the candles and the subject are in a straight line. Move to one side or the other. In addition, the subject may have some reflective make-up on..

It is much like shooting flash through a window. If you shoot head on into the glass you will get the refelction of the flash. Move to one side (45 degree angle) and you will not..

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #1

Take the "protective" UV filter (or whatever) off the lens..

You can minimize this, if you need the filter, by using a filter with high-end coatings...

Comment #2

Funkymunky wrote:.

I am not sure why this happens when I try to take a picture withoutflash. I get the reflection of the candles. I would appreciate it ifsumone can tell me what I am doing wrong and how to avoid this. Thankyou.

What happens is that the light from the candles reflects on the sensor, reflects again on SOMETHING, than returns to the sensor, where is captured. Because on that spot it's the dark woman's face, the reflected candle light is visible. The phenomenon is known as ghosting..

Now, how to avoid it. The most common _something_ that reflects back the light is a filter. Remove it. 98% of the problem should dissapear..

Second measure. Add some light to the woman's face. Think flash. The ghosted lights will be less visible.

Third measure. Move the candles or the woman. Ghosting is always symmetrical to the center of the lens.Fourth measure. Ghosting is a bit reduced if you close the aperture..

Looking at the seriousness of the ghosting, I'd bet there is a cheapish protective UV filter on the lens, am I right? Get rid of it, you don't need it and it will only cause you problems..

/d/n..

Comment #3

Thank you guys! .

The filter which on this lens is not an expensive one, just a normal UV filter. It may be like what you guys say the filter is causing the reflection. What filter would one recommend? Perhaps the multicoated kind, tell me.......

Comment #4

Any multi coated filter from any of the following:.

B&WHeliopanHoyaTiffenCokinNikon.

Am I missing some here .... you do have choices. Don't use some cheap stuff and don't buy the bottom line. Your lens is as good as the filter on it ... or something like that...

Comment #5

Funkymunky wrote:.

What filter would one recommend?.

How about NONE.There are two camps#1 buys a new lens, then immediately puts a filter on it#2 buys a new lens, and always uses the lens hood, and is otherwise careful..

I prefer not to have any extra glass or air-gaps between the image and my sensor.I'm a grown-up, and am willing to take the risk of no UV filter.

Warm regards,DOF..

Comment #6

Funkymunky wrote:.

Thank you guys! .

The filter which on this lens is not an expensive one, just a normalUV filter. It may be like what you guys say the filter is causing thereflection. What filter would one recommend? Perhaps the multicoatedkind, tell me......

I took a look at the exif info. I believe you are shooting with the 50mm f1.8, right? That's a 75$ lens..

Good news. A good B+W 52mm UV filter is 120$..

Now, ask yourself a question. Why do you want an UV filter on the lens? It WILL degrade your image, no matter how expensive it is. The 50mm is nicely designed, with the front element hidden deep in the barrel. Slap a piece of glass on the front of the barrel and you increase the flare/glare chance tenfold..

The UV filter does NOTHING good to your image, and it does preciously little to protect the lens. Simply don't use it unless you really need it. Good examples of "really need it" would be when shooting in spray, to easier clean the lens. When it snows or it's very cold to clean easily the ice or melted snow. And so on..

In those situations you can use any UV filter you want, because the problems the filter induces will count little against the environment problems. However, remember to protect the rest of the camera ..

Comment #7

"Good news. A good B+W 52mm UV filter is 120$. ".

I think you are guessing. Unfortunately incorrectly..

A Heliopan slim SH-PMC multicoated UV filter in 52mm has a manufacturer's suggested list price in the USA of $90.00 and most stores sell it for $54.00. A B+W one is less. So at your guess you could get a Heliopan SH-PMC Slim UV filter and a Heliopan slim circular polarizer in 52mm..

Non-grey market B+W filters would be about the same price as the Heliopan..

Maybe try making your point again?..

Comment #8

Bob Sal wrote:.

"Good news. A good B+W 52mm UV filter is 120$. ".

I think you are guessing. Unfortunately incorrectly..

Nope, I just wasn't paying enough attention..

Go B&H. Search for 52mm UV filter. Sort by price. First is 120$ B+W..

What I missed is that it is UV and IR blocking, but what the heck .

Maybe try making your point again?.

I feel that the essence of my point was that UV filters are usually unnecessary. Prices only underline that point..

I am not sure what your point is, however...

Comment #9

Bob Sal wrote:.

Maybe try making your point again?.

The point is.... Why spend that much money trying to "protect" a lens that is that cheap. Not to mention that the front element of that lens is pretty well protected. Better to go bare, and not degrade the image..

Comment #10

If you use the Heliopan Digital filter that blocks UV and IR you will improve the color separation, color saturation, get improved reds and greens as well as better blacks with any digital camera. This is the filter that totally eliminates the M8 bug..

However it works on cheap as well as expensive lenses. The idea is not to simply to protect with this filter. It also improves the image..

But it might cost more then this user's lens..

But the improved colors might just be important to some people...

Comment #11

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.