snubbr.com

Which set up to begin with?
Hi There,.

I am new to photography and I am just about to purchase my first Digital SLR and lens/lenses. I was wondering if someone could point me in the right direction with regards to equipment I should buy. I have spoken to a keen photographer who seems to think either the Nikon D60 or D80 would be a good place to start although I am not sure whether to buy a mid range camera then upgrade in a while or buy a semi-pro DSLR then learn to use it. Any advice would be very much appreciated. With regards to budget I don't have a limit as such but I wouldn't want to spend thousands just yet. Maybe about 1500 or there abouts. I like taking photo's of people and animals like pet's or the animals at the zoo so something that might be good for this purpose...

Comments (14)

If you don't have a specific need that a semi-pro model would fill than I think you should get an entry level dslr which are incredible cameras. You would be better off by far spending more money on better lenses. For example, If you get a D60 then get the 60mm prime in addition to the kit...

Comment #1

That's a nice budget. I'd get probably a nice entry level cam and spend the remaining money on a good lens, a tripod, a bag and a good flash unit!Sony DSC-H50 P&SOlympus E-510 w/ dual kit lenses (28-84mm/80-300mm equiv. 35mm)Canon XTi 400D w/ dual lenses (28-88mm/120-480mm equiv. 35mm)..

Comment #2

Do you think the Nikon D60 or D80 would be a better bet than say the Canon 450 XSI. I really want to stick to either Canon or Nikon. Which lenses should be considered as good choices/must haves for portrait's and animal shots(dog show's etc)? I have also noticed that the Canon D40 is now quite close to the 450 XSI so might that be a better bet? Thanks for the swift replies by the way...

Comment #3

Of the three you mentioned, I would get the D80. But don't limit yourself to CaNikon unless you already have lenses. Olympus for example makes outstanding lenses and the dual lens kit is probably the best there is. And Oly gives you image stabilization in the body, so it works with all lenses. I'd not get the D40 because of the lack of lens motor in the body. The D80 has it and your not limited to those specific lenses with it.

I have the 400D (XTi) and my Olympus eats the camera for lunch as far as kit lenses go..

The D80 is one fine (albeit a little old) camera though!!!.

Sony DSC-H50 P&SOlympus E-510 w/ dual kit lenses (28-84mm/80-300mm equiv. 35mm)Canon XTi 400D w/ dual lenses (28-88mm/120-480mm equiv. 35mm)..

Comment #4

Hi Dennis,.

I am starting a college course in August/September and I am not sure whether to wait till I start the course or get a bit of practise in before I start the course. Head's bursting looking through reviews for every camera ever made I think. I hadn't even gave Olympus a though because I was under the impression that Canon and Nikon were the two main companies. I might have a look at Olympus camera's for the rest of today and see what they've got. Do Olympus have enough good camera's though that should I get better at photography and want to move up a level then there would be a Semi-Pro DSLR that I could use my lenses on?..

Comment #5

Yeah, they do. the E-510/520 is their entry level dSRL (the E-410/420 is even smaller than that but mostly identical) and the E-3 is the semi-pro setup. The review of the E-3 is here at dpreview. The Oly kit lens reviews are up as well on this site and dpreview was impressed.Sony DSC-H50 P&SOlympus E-510 w/ dual kit lenses (28-84mm/80-300mm equiv. 35mm)Canon XTi 400D w/ dual lenses (28-88mm/120-480mm equiv. 35mm)..

Comment #6

Ok, don't get me wrong though: The Nikon D80 is one fine camera and from a technical standpoint a little above the E-510/520 and a little below the E-3 but nonetheless, a mighty fine piece of equipment! But you always pay for lenses with image stabilization if you want that feature whereas you don't with Olympus since it's in the body!.

Sony DSC-H50 P&SOlympus E-510 w/ dual kit lenses (28-84mm/80-300mm equiv. 35mm)Canon XTi 400D w/ dual lenses (28-88mm/120-480mm equiv. 35mm)..

Comment #7

Scottduffyuk wrote:.

Do you think the Nikon D60 or D80 would be a better bet than say theCanon 450 XSI. I really want to stick to either Canon or Nikon. Whichlenses should be considered as good choices/must haves for portrait'sand animal shots(dog show's etc)?.

If you were to go with Nikon, then I'd get the d80, 18-135 kit and the 85mm 1.8 as your portrait lens...

Comment #8

Try not to stress over the decision. Keep in mind the quandry in deciding is really a matter of so many great choices. If the set up includes some one or more really good lenses you will be very happy with your decision...

Comment #9

Thanks Mary,.

It's not so much stressing as just annoying me. I have thought once or twice that I knew what I wanted then read one of the many review sites and changed my mind again. I will certainly take on board the lenses you put forward though. According to one site I read the Nikon 28-200 lens should have a big S on the front as it's the greatest lens of all time then other sites are calling it a jack of all trades and master of none. My heads spinning reading them all...

Comment #10

One thing to consider is not only the technical specs but more so how the camera feels in your hand. I was, when I shopped for my first dSLR all set to buy the Canon 40D. I went to the store, handled the cam and while it's a great performing camera, it just didn't "feel" right. I ended up with the Olympus instead..

As for lenses, zoom lenses are generally not as sharp as fixed focal lenses. That's maybe why some people call the 28-200 a great lens (and it is for a zoom lens) and some call it jack of all trades because a dedicated 200mm fixed lens is simply better. But it can't zoom..

Honestly, if you have the capability, go to a store with as many models as possible. Handle them all. Take pictures in the store. See how the camera feels in your hands. Go through the menus. THEN make your decision.

ALL of them are capable. The technical differences between the entry level cams are somewhat mundane and should actually not influence your buying decision too much, unless it's a feature you REALLY REALLY want as image stabilization for example (very strong factor for me with my shaking hands)..

It's much more important to have the right feel and the right choice of lenses available in the future than having a cam that can probably shoot 0.3 frames per second faster than the other or has ISO 6400 instead of "only" ISO 3200..

Scottduffyuk wrote:.

Thanks Mary,.

It's not so much stressing as just annoying me. I have thought onceor twice that I knew what I wanted then read one of the many reviewsites and changed my mind again. I will certainly take on board thelenses you put forward though. According to one site I read the Nikon28-200 lens should have a big S on the front as it's the greatestlens of all time then other sites are calling it a jack of all tradesand master of none. My heads spinning reading them all..

Sony DSC-H50 P&SOlympus E-510 w/ dual kit lenses (28-84mm/80-300mm equiv. 35mm)Canon XTi 400D w/ dual lenses (28-88mm/120-480mm equiv. 35mm)..

Comment #11

Scottduffyuk wrote:.

Thanks Mary,.

According to one site I read the Nikon28-200 lens should have a big S on the front as it's the greatestlens of all time then other sites are calling it a jack of all tradesand master of none. My heads spinning reading them all..

I think you mean the Nikon 18-200 VR. The 28-200 is an older discontinued lens...

Comment #12

MaryGierth wrote:.

Scottduffyuk wrote:.

Thanks Mary,.

According to one site I read the Nikon28-200 lens should have a big S on the front as it's the greatestlens of all time then other sites are calling it a jack of all tradesand master of none. My heads spinning reading them all..

I think you mean the Nikon 18-200 VR. The 28-200 is an olderdiscontinued lens..

I just want to clarify one thing - I did not mean to suggest that the 18-200 VR is the best lens of all time but it is a versatile lens that many people are very pleased with...

Comment #13

Some thoughts-.

- any entry level dslr in the hands of a knowledgable user can make very good to excellant pics. thes can be from any maker. be nikon canon olympus sony or pentax..

-donot stick with nikon or canon thinking the other 3 makers cannot match them in image quality at the entry level. they sure can..

-just checked: the canon 450 is about $8-900. the nikon d60 and pentax k200d are both $600+. the olympus 420 is $500+. the sony a300 is about $500+...

Comment #14

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.