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Which Nikon lens to get as my second lens?
Hi,I am new to photography (just a week olds) and have purchased the following :.

Nikon D300Nikon 18-200 VRNikon SB800 Flash.

I want to purchase my next lens, am not too sure what to go for exactly. I dont think I would need a telephoto lens for now. Maybe a fish eye (but thats not used a lot) or a wide angle lens, or a potrait lens..

I do think I would be snapping more potraits for fun, than any other thing..

In particular I have been going over the :.

AF DC-NIKKOR 105mm f/2D, lens in particular. Would you recommend this as my next purchase? I am not a photographer by profession, so I have to be careful into what to invest in next. My limit is $1000, maybe give an extra 100 more..

Other lenses I was looking at are :.

AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G EDAF-S VR NIKKOR 200mm f/2G IF-ED.

Again, both outof my budget for sure, but they just caught my attention more. Wouldnt mind saving up for them later on..

If you recommend a telephoto lens, I am open to suggestions..

ALso what sort of filters would you recommend?.

I know I need to add the following filters to my kit :.

UVPolarizingHigh Contrast.

Which brand would you suggest, if it's going to be a one time purchase. Nikon filters I can get my hands on readily, anything else I would need to order from abroad (I reside in Pakistan btw)..

Thanks,Raza..

Comments (21)

Honestly, what I recommend is that you stop spending money. You've got almost $3000 worth of equipment, but say that you're only a few weeks into photography..

Slow down!.

Seriously, the type of lens you purchase next should be driven by the type of pictures you want to take. Macros, landscapes, portraits? IT all depends..

The 18-200 is a good all-around lens and should serve your needs for everything but macro work..

Take out what you have, and learn from your own experience what you need next. Get into photography, not cameras and lenses..

If there was one lens, I would recommend you get a 50mm 1.8 lens and leave it on the camera. It's a good cheap lens, and a good place to learn how to see through the camera..

Everything I write is a personal opinion. Even when I quote facts, they are the facts I personally choose to accept.http://www.pbase.com/mariog..

Comment #1

Wow....a week into it and you've got some pretty nice equipment there. The D300 is a nice camera with a heck of a lot of functions..

I'm new to the DSLR world as well but not new to SLR photography. I had a chance to test out a few cameras before I settled on my D200 (lot more customizations of settings, good weight, feels great, good auto focus system and also recognizes older lenses). And yes even considered the D300 but I wouldn't be using half the functions of the D300 so it wasn't worth stepping up a little higher for me..

I took into consideration of what lenses to use before making my camera purchase. But before I was able to do that I had to figure out what I like to take pictures of..

If you had an old point and shoot, take a look through your photos and see what types of pics they are. If they are mainly portraits and some scenic shot, then the 18-200mm will do you fine. I personally don't have that lens but I have shot with it. I highly suggest, as the previous poster has suggested as well, get to know your camera before you go and buy new lenses. You really do need to familiarize yourself with what all the different settings do on the camera. As suggested, if you must get a lens, the 50mm F1.8 is a great lens to get..

Go out and shoot in a variety of different lighting situations to get a feel of your camera and it's settings. Having expensive, nice lenses will not make you a good photographer if you don't know how to use them. Starting with the 50mm F1.8 would be a good way to learn about correct focusing, exposure, shutter speed, use of flash, F-stops in relation to depth of field, etc...

Comment #2

Note taken..

I will be collecting the AF-S Nikon 50mm F/1.8 tomorrow, I saw the lends today, looked kinda small and compact. The first noticable thing about it was it's aperture .

Any other comments are still entertained..

I want a bag for all this too, am looking at the PELICAN 1600...

Comment #3

I was about to say 50 1.8 hands down. Good to see that it's been covered. Once you learn the camera and begin to understand the IQ and light gathering benefits of the 50 1.8, I suspect you will be considering a faster zoom either at the low end or telephoto depending on what you shoot most. When you do I would suggest the 80-200 2.8 ED or a Tamron 17-50 2.8. Both excellent optics for the $. Exotic lenses like the 200 f2 IMHO are overkill for anyone other than a pro shooting basketball or something. 14-24 2.8 is admittedly an AWESOME piece of glass, but for a beginner with a D300 the excellent Tokina 12-24 f4 would probably be a much more practical choice and serve you well...

Comment #4

Like the others said, stop spending, start learning to use what you have..

Figure out what you like to shoot, wide angle or tele? low light? etc etc. Let thatdrive your decision..

A hard case like the Pelican is not useful for actually having the camera w/ you and using it. Consider any number of Lowepro, Kata, ThinkTank, Tamrac, Crumpler bags...

Comment #5

Like you, I suffer from "acquisition disorder". Before my babies were born, I got D80 + 18-200 + SB600..

Other things I got were wireless remote, rocket dust cleaner, circular polarizer and angled viewfinder (to make it easy to take low clearance shots of babies and pets)..

After I read "understanding exposure" and learned about DOF and such, I got 50 1.8 for portraits..

After I read Kelby's photoshop book and learned more about white balance and such, I got a gray card..

After I seeing some portrait work by others, I got tripod, autopoles, paper backgrounds and a couple of umbrellas for my SB600..

Now, since you clearly have a lot of income to dispose of and choose to ignore excellent advise about saving money, I guess you could get 50 1.4 instead of 1.8 and another SB800. Read Kelby's books "Digital photography" both, 1 and 2. Plenty of useful advices there to feed your acquisition disorder. Studio lights, soft boxes, you name it. If you decide you're into sports photography - you're into 30k+ territory...

Comment #6

I also like to aquire, but I've done it over almost 50 years, over 35 years using Nikons..

I would suggest you take that money that is burning a hole in your pocket and invest in a good workshop or some classes at the local community college. Have fun with what you own..

Now, that said, if you really want to buy a new lens, I wouldn't choose the 50 everyone is suggesting. Don't get me wrong, it's a good lense but doesn't really add much, IMO..

I would purchase the wonderful 60 mm f2.8 Micro Nikkor. It's fairly inexpensive and will open a new world for you. Not only will you get macro, but it makes a superb portrait lens. Moreover, it's a stellar performer optically, one of the sharpest lenses out there. I own one as well as several other macro lenses, but the 60 will always be a keeper. I think you'll use it way more than a 50 f1.8..

I bought my first one in the late 60s when I moved from Pentax to Nikon. I still have it. It's a 55 f3.5 Micro Nikkor and is lengendary for it's optical perfomance..

Don't forget a good tripod, whatever you get...

Comment #7

I would also say the same two things. Get the 50 f1.8 and attend a nikonains school on the D300. maybe a Nikon school also. They will help your photography a lot more than lenses will. Only buy a lens that you know you need after you have found you like that kind of shooting.Chris, Broussard, LA..

Comment #8

It sounds like yoou don't have a strong need for another lens qt the moment. You might want to wait and see where you wind up going with photography. Your interests are likely to change as you mature as a photographer.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington..

Comment #9

Hi Mario,.

Thanks for your advise. Yes, your right I am getting a bit too excited about it all, and jumping to buy a whole bunch of things when I wont even know the 101 of photography..

I've ordered the 50mm lens, will def get it and stop there till I can learn some more...

Comment #10

When I read your question and the lens you already have, the comment below was exactly the lense I would also recommend. You already have covered all the focal length you will need for a walk around lens. So for other uses that will give the best quality images, a top quality prime lens would be a good choice. The 60mm micro is not that expensive but quality wise, it is tops. - Will.

I would purchase the wonderful 60 mm f2.8 Micro Nikkor. It's fairlyinexpensive and will open a new world for you. Not only will you getmacro, but it makes a superb portrait lens. Moreover, it's a stellarperformer optically, one of the sharpest lenses out there.Don't forget a good tripod, whatever you get...

Comment #11

I think other people have mentioned this before, but I'll throw in my two cents..

Bottom line - take some photography lessons. I'm sorry to seem harsh, but you just got yourself a professional-level camera with a very expensive consumer-level lens and flash. It looks like you're trying to run before you learn how to walk..

I *strongly* recommend you take a step back, and take some time to understand the fundamentals of photography, namely composition and lighting. You mentioned you're interested in portraiture. Lighting and composition are FAR MORE IMPORTANT than the lens you choose for portraiture. Look for any community classes that will teach you the fundamentals of exposure and how to properly light a subject. They should teach you on using natural light first, and then using studio lights. And most importantly, they should provide you with hands-on experience, either though homework assignments or labs.



With proper knowledge of lighting and composition, an impoverished photography student will take far better photographs with a digital compact than someone who just bought a pro-level camera and doesn't know how to use it. I've seen some stunning photos taken by 1st year photography students using a 2nd hand Canon compact and reflectors made with an old bedsheet. I've also seen some truly awful portraits taken with a Canon 1D..

If you're itching to buy a lens, then get a lens that fills a big gap in your setup - a fast prime, something like a 50mm/1.8 or 50mm/1.4. First, this lens will help you really understand the concept of aperture and depth of field because it has a much larger maximum aperture than your 18-200. Second, it will allow you to take photos in much lower lighting conditions than your 18-200, despite the fact it doesn't have VR. Thirdly, it's much sharper than your 18-200, even though it's much cheaper..

Again, I'm sorry if I seem harsh, but I've seen too many people who spend thousands of dollars on equipment without really using the full potential of what they have. I usually urge them to build up the fundamental skills with what they have, instead of buying even more equipment..

Hope this helps, and good luck!.

Razakhan wrote:.

Hi,I am new to photography (just a week olds) and have purchased thefollowing :.

Nikon D300Nikon 18-200 VRNikon SB800 Flash.

I want to purchase my next lens, am not too sure what to go forexactly. I dont think I would need a telephoto lens for now. Maybe afish eye (but thats not used a lot) or a wide angle lens, or apotrait lens..

I do think I would be snapping more potraits for fun, than any otherthing..

In particular I have been going over the :.

AF DC-NIKKOR 105mm f/2D, lens in particular. Would you recommend thisas my next purchase? I am not a photographer by profession, so I haveto be careful into what to invest in next. My limit is $1000, maybegive an extra 100 more..

Other lenses I was looking at are :.

AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G EDAF-S VR NIKKOR 200mm f/2G IF-ED.

Again, both outof my budget for sure, but they just caught myattention more. Wouldnt mind saving up for them later on..

If you recommend a telephoto lens, I am open to suggestions..

ALso what sort of filters would you recommend?.

I know I need to add the following filters to my kit :.

UVPolarizingHigh Contrast.

Which brand would you suggest, if it's going to be a one timepurchase. Nikon filters I can get my hands on readily, anything elseI would need to order from abroad (I reside in Pakistan btw)..

Thanks,Raza..

Comment #12

I agree with everyone who tells you to just sit back and shoot with what you have for awhile. You could spend a full year with that lens and just get used to it. Read the books that were recommended, they are excellent..

The 50/1.8 was a good choice..

If I could recommend something that the others haven't, it is the Canon D500 close-up filter. You can just screw it onto your 18-200 lens to take macros, and it costs little more than the 50mm lens..

Shoot a lot of pictures and relax..

Coolpix 950, 4500, P5000, D50, Canon 250D, 500D, 50mm/1.8, 105VR, 18-200VR, 70-300VR, Sigma 10-20.CATS member>^..^<#31WSSA member#40 ( Head Squirrel)PAS Charter member #5MAA memberhttp://www.pbase.com/thegaber.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #13

Hi,.

Thanks for the rocommendation, not harsh at all. I do understand what you are are trying to say. As for taking photography lessons, i'll try and see if they have something like that here in Karachi, Pakistan, or maybe some pro hobbiest can help me out. Incase I cant find any lessons, is there anything on the internet you would recommend I should read?.

I'll try to get hold of the mentioned books too..

Regards,Raza..

Comment #14

Mario,.

Thanks for the reply. I understand, I guess am just a lil too excited about my gear and thought I should have a few more lenses. I agree with with you say, I'll hold back and try to understand the camera and lens more..

Though I have ordered for a 50mm/1.8.

Regards,Raza..

Comment #15

Hi there,.

Thanks for your advise, like many have suggested, I have ordered for a 50mm/1.8. Can you recommend me any good book or preferably any good reading material if it's available online? tutorial?..

Comment #16

Hi,.

Thanks for the in-sight on other camera bags. Will definitely look into it, and indeed it makes sense having something more portable, like bagpacks / strap on pouches n belts..

Thanks..

Comment #17

Hi,.

Thanks for the recommending me the book, I'll try to look around for them maybe torrents too for an electronic format which I can download? Are there any online websites you would recommend?.

You said I should go for 1.4 rather than 1.8, could you elaborate on your recommendation?.

Much thanks,Raza..

Comment #18

Hi,.

Thanks for recommending me the Nikon Micro 60mm. Speaking of Micro, can you please look at my other thread on Nikon 105mm/2.8 Micro..

I have a problem with that lens, was almost on verge of getting it, but when I checked it diaphragm, it's not symmetrical to form a near circle. Rather, it opens up like a pear/tear drop shapped. Is that normal or abnormal? The 105 had 9 blades, and it seens only open up (9th overlapping) to farm a pear shaped asymmetrical aperture..

Can you please tell me if it's a problem or it's normal?.

Though I did read somewhere that the new thing now is teh asymetrical apertures as they provide for better field of depth/bokeh..

Much thanks,Raza..

Comment #19

Razakhan wrote:.

ALso what sort of filters would you recommend?.

I know I need to add the following filters to my kit :.

UVPolarizingHigh Contrast.

You've had some good advice regarding buying lenses but I see nobody has answered this part..

You don't need a UV filter, it does nothing useful. People buy UV filters to protect the front elements of their lenses because they used to be the nearest thing to a completely clear filter, but they can cause flare. Unless you are working in a difficult environment I would normally advise no filter at all. The best protection for your lens is:.

- Use the lens cap!- Take reasonable care.- Use a lens hood.

- Get yourself a blower and a 'lens pen' so you can clean the lens without damage..

But, if you are likely to be in situations where dust (therefore frequent cleaning), salt spray and the like are a problem, get a *good quality* clear filter. Or a UV filter is an acceptable substitute..

A polarising filter is a very useful item. Unfortunately the good ones are expensive, but cheap filters really are bad news..

High contrast filter? I don't you what you mean (which probably means you don't need one!).

Which brand would you suggest, if it's going to be a one timepurchase. Nikon filters I can get my hands on readily, anything elseI would need to order from abroad (I reside in Pakistan btw)..

Hoya/Kenko (same filters appearing under two different brand names) but only their top of the range multicoated filters. They also make cheap filters which are to be avoided. B+W filters are superb..

Here's a supplier that many of us use:http://www.hvstar.net..

Look for the Hoya/Kenko Pro1 Digital clear flters, and the B+W MRC ('multi-resistant coating') polarizers The B+W Kaesemann (KSM) polariser is best of all...

Comment #20

Razakhan wrote:.

Hi,Thanks for the recommending me the book, I'll try to look around forthem maybe torrents too for an electronic format which I candownload? Are there any online websites you would recommend?.

You said I should go for 1.4 rather than 1.8, could you elaborate onyour recommendation?.

Much thanks,Raza.

The 50mm f/1.8 is an inexpensive high speed lens that can be used indoors and to produce a narrow depth of field. The 50m f/1.4 costs more than twice as much but it's constructed better and, of course, can operate in even dimmer light and can produce an even narrower depth of field. Both lenses are quite sharp, so the f/1.4 can do anything the f/1.8 can and more..

Leonard Migliore..

Comment #21

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