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What MODE do you guys usually use?
I know different modes exist for different environment. I am curious to see what mode do you prefer for certain environment. For example, if you were out in a sunny day with your GF and you are just taking snap shots of her, what mode do you use? I use Aperture Priority mode since it's easy to control whether the background comes out clearly or in a blur. But how about in darker places? At night? For landscape?..

Comments (28)

1DM2 W/550EX flash indoors, camera is manual, setting are determined by availible light and clients needs. (Very common to shoot in a big dak room so I drag the shutter at 1/20 or slower to bring in some background light. The flash will freeze the forground subject for you, if you are careful and/or using IS).

Flash is manual if the light in the room is consistant, or ETTL -1/3 to -2 stops if the targets are more dynamic and varied..

Landscapes are always manual, using the historgram as a meter. (RAW mode).

Wildlife is AV with+2/3 or the 550 ash with a better beamer flash extender to throw flash much farther. (RAW).

ASA for landscapes and wildlife are kept as low as possible to allow proper shutter speeds..

Indoor work is 400 to 1600ASA. Depends on what I'm shooting..

Studio stuff is always 50 or 100ASA..

Jim Bianchihttp://www.thephotoop.comDigital guru in the making...

Comment #1

Lazism wrote:.

I know different modes exist for different environment. I am curiousto see what mode do you prefer for certain environment. For example,if you were out in a sunny day with your GF and you are just takingsnap shots of her, what mode do you use? I use Aperture Priority modesince it's easy to control whether the background comes out clearlyor in a blur. But how about in darker places? At night? For landscape?.

There is really only "two" modes .... Aperture or Shutter priority..

You are correct in that Aperture priority is better when you want to control DOF..

BUT ... with aperture priority, the big danger is a longer shutter speed that results in a blurry photo. I submit that there is no DOF if you have a blurry image, since nothing is "sharp" any more. So setting F/22 in an attempt to keep "everything" sharp can very often be self-defeating..

I most often use Shutter priority because I ALWAYS want to know what my shutter speed is. It is most important if I am using a long focal length, but I also like the creative effects I can get with long shutter speeds; (but it is still most important exactly "what" that long shutter speed is)..

In other words, I do like "movement" in my photos, (of moving objects), but it must be a very controlled and repeatable amount of movement..

I said there was only "two" modes ... (Aperture and Shutter priority) ... I do not consider "Program" a mode. It does nothing but convert your very-expensive professional-level DSLR into a cheap P&S. (Albeit you can spend an entire lifetime studying the various combinations of varieties of "program" modes.).

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #2

Thanks for your replies guys..

Let's say you are shooting on a tripod and guaranteed steady shot. Also, let's assume that DOF does not matter. Which would create a sharper/clearer image?.

Larger Aperture with Faster Shutter Speed? or Smaller Aperture with Slower Shutter Speed? If they both get the same exposure, which would result in better image quality?..

Comment #3

Lazism wrote:.

I know different modes exist for different environment. I am curiousto see what mode do you prefer for certain environment. For example,if you were out in a sunny day with your GF and you are just takingsnap shots of her, what mode do you use? I use Aperture Priority modesince it's easy to control whether the background comes out clearlyor in a blur. But how about in darker places? At night? For landscape?.

I used to shoot A mode most of the time and yes I can shoot almost any situation using the A mode. Then I realized that using the 'right' mode can make it easier. Just stick to what each mode is intended to. When DOF is the most important thing, I use A mode. When shutter speed is the one I want to control, I use the S mode. When I want to control both Aperture and Shutter speed, M mode is my choice.



For example, when shooting in low light, I want to control the minimum shutter speed to avoid camera shake and motion blur. I can do this in A mode, choose the aperture and adjust the ISO to get an acceptable shutter speed. But I can achieve the same results easier by using S mode, the mode for shots when shutter speed is your priority. As I know that I won't get the optimal exposure at the lowest ISO, I use the auto ISO. When I want to also control the aperture, stopping down for more dof for example, I dial to M mode, set the shutter speed and aperture, and let the camera chooses the ISO..

Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00.

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Comment #4

Lazism wrote:.

Thanks for your replies guys.Let's say you are shooting on a tripod and guaranteed steady shot.Also, let's assume that DOF does not matter. Which would create asharper/clearer image?Larger Aperture with Faster Shutter Speed? or Smaller Aperture withSlower Shutter Speed? If they both get the same exposure, which wouldresult in better image quality?.

NEITHER would give you the best image quality; (assuming you are using the lens at either the max opening or smallest opening..

1. Lenses have a "sweetspot" which is usually about in the middle range. (I have seen 3 stops down from wide-open ... and 2 stops more open from the smallest aperture. Specific lenses may vary.).

Very few lenses are very sharp wide-open, some are very noticeably "soft"..

Likewise, when at the smallest opening, you are only using a tiny portion of the center of the lens, not usually the sharpest result either..

2. Another common phenominal is called "defraction" if you are using a very "small" sensor .... it means that the image can be very soft if you use too "small" an opening..

Up to f/64 was usable with 4x5 film cameras;but only about f/32 with MF (120 film - 2.25" x 2.25");while f16 or f/22 was the normal usable limit with 35mm FF (full-frame)..

On todays P&S cameras, (with sensors smaller than FF 35mm) ... it is common to only see a f/8 allowable..

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #5

Rafy S. has it figured out. If you're using only one mode primarily, you're still not using your DSLR to it's maximum possible potential. Using one mode only (Aperture, shutter, manual) might take a little more thought than Auto or Program, but you're still in a P&S mentality...

Comment #6

Not much more to add, but when you are ready to move beyond full auto, take the time to learn photography so you'll understand what all that stuff means..

Don't worry! If you are smart enough to get to this forum and post a question, you are smart enough to learn how to operate a camera. I think you'll find after 2 or 3 or 4 learning sessions, it's just as fast and accurate as full auto, and after 10, it makes for better photos.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington..

Comment #7

I can't claim to be expert enough to comment, but there's an interesting article by Philip Dunn on using Manual mode at:.

Http://philipdunn.blogspot.com/.../2008/01/how-to-use-manual-mode-part-1.html.

Stevehttp://www.pictureoriginals.co.uk..

Comment #8

Thanks for the Dunn link, Steve. Of all the things I've read, somehow the relationship between ISO/appearature/speed came clearest in that short piece. I recommend it to all novices...Brian..

Comment #9

To your original question... my camera lives on P for Program, and chages to M fr Manual when I have a specific need for extra control..

P allows easy changes to any aperture or shutter speed I want, if the camera-selected combo isn't to my liking; for instance, I might turn the control wheel to open the aperture to reduce depth of field..

I used manual today to shoot television screens because I wanted to keep the shutter speed at 1/30, and I wanted the overall exposure to remain the same from shot to shot..

For your second question about tripods and sharpness....

The combination of shutter speed and aperture depends on overall light levels, of course, but also on the subject. You might having moving subjects, so need to have either a fast shutter speed, or a slow one to blur some parts of the shot on purpose. Someone waing, for instance, might mean a sharp body and a blurry arm..

Or pick a small aperture to get all three rows of people sharp..

Ain't no rules except"it depends.".

BAK..

Comment #10

Mine stays in P most of the time for general shooting...I use Av, and Tv mode when I want the semi-auto controlI use M with studio stuff.

I have a tripod, but don't have a need for it. Maybe for a family portrait I guess.Peter .

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Enjoy your photography images, even if your wife doesn't ! ;-(http://laurence-photography.com/http://www.pbase.com/peterarbib/Cameras in profile...

Comment #11

Lazism wrote:.

Thanks for your replies guys.Let's say you are shooting on a tripod and guaranteed steady shot.Also, let's assume that DOF does not matter. Which would create asharper/clearer image?Larger Aperture with Faster Shutter Speed? or Smaller Aperture withSlower Shutter Speed? If they both get the same exposure, which wouldresult in better image quality?.

This is an example of what you can get using 3s shutter speed..

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Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #12

Others have pointed out that different exposure modes are geared toward making certain exposure parameters easier or faster to control, and that the mode chosen depends more on which parameter is most important for you to control to get the desired result rather than the environment you're in..

For me, another aspect of mode choice is how the different modes are implemented by the camera. You have the very nice Canon 40D, with which I am unfamiliar. I use the budget-minded Samsung GX-1S. On my camera, changing from one mode to another changes what the control wheel and certain buttons do, even to the point that turning the control wheel to the right increases exposure in one mode while reducing it in another..

It's important to me that I be able to operate my camera's controls quickly and predictably, without fumbling or spending extra thought on what my fingers have to do to make the desired settings. For that reason, I prefer to use just one mode (I use "manual" with this camera). This desire to have the camera work the same every time extends to other features as well; e.g., I always use just the center auto-focus point, assign focus to the OK button rather than the shutter release, and leave the metering pattern set to spot..

A different camera might operate more consistently from one mode to another, and I'm sure other users are simply more adaptable than I am, but using the camera the way I've described works best for me...

Comment #13

Which mode do you use?.

Answer- it depends on the scene, the situation, and what the photographer wants to accomplish(his intent for the finished image). there is no "right" answer that is the one mode to use all the time. it depends on scene situation and photos intent...

Comment #14

JoePhoto wrote:.

There is really only "two" modes .... Aperture or Shutter priority..

I said there was only "two" modes ... (Aperture and Shutter priority)... I do not consider "Program" a mode. It does nothing but convertyour very-expensive professional-level DSLR into a cheap P&S..

There really are only two modes: "Manual", and everything else (resulting in "automatic exposure")..

"Everything else" can be contained in (dealt with) by "Programme Shift" (ie, the camera is in "P mode", but turning the wheel rotates you through the different equivalent aperture/shutter combinations for the scene. (Av and Tv "modes" are only really a "variation" of P)..

That is to say: there's Manual and Auto (although Auto has some sub-categories with varying degrees of "sophistication").

Hence "Aperture" and "Shutter priority" are not so much "modes" as "sub-modes" of "Automatic Exposure Mode"..

Comment #15

....but I usually want to know what my aperture is so I use aperture priorty the most. Just a habit I got into, and as I get more skilled my shots are getting better. However, I do agree with Joe that the risk of a blurry shot in certain circumstances (moving subject, or camera shake at a long focal length) militates a switch to shutter priority. But I find of late I am doing a lot of casual indoor stuff with my an SB600, and adjusting aperture to control exposure is what I like to do..

I have another personal reason for preferring aperture priority where possible. I recently scratched the sensor filter in my D40, and the blemish tends to be a barely noticeable shadow at wide apertures that can be easily blended imperceptibly into a blurry background in software (I find the Spot & Patch feature of Aperture pretty good here, and others say the Dust Off feature of Capture NX is even better). On the other hand, at smaller apertures the image of the scratch is more clearly demarcated and in some cases can be easier to remove in post processing provided I can grab a nearby sample of pixels that give me a good texture and colour match, though at first it looks bloody awful and obvious in an unedited pic. As the D40 is my "fun" camera and I tend to prefer it for casual situations where I want to capture the moment with a quality a bit beyond a P&S, but I don't want to tote around the heavier and more valuable D80. (Actually, the compactness, big bright LCD, and fun to use interface made me fall in love with the D40, though I still believe my D70 still takes slightly better 6.1 Mpixel pics.) But if I find myself wanting to take special photographs where small apertures may come into playsuch as panoramic outdoor scenesand I really don't want to fuss with post-processing out a scratch mark, I need to plan ahead and take the D80 (whose sensor filter has only a little dust which will be tolerated gratefully by me after my fiasco with the D40!) Trying to minimize the visibility of sensor dust and blemishes shouldn't be a major factor in choice of aperture in DSLRs, but it is worth thinking about, and in my case I would rather try to work around the issue as much as possible than risk bunging up another sensor filter in obsessive efforts to eliminate every speck..

Like Joe I tend to shy away from the preprogrammed modes. I actually find for me they complicate thingsjust look at the D40 or D70 or D80 manual at the tables that list endlessly the defaults for the various modes. And think of all of entries in the menu item descriptions that mention that a particular feature is disabled, enabled, or behaves in a different way depending on the preprogrammed mode. Boggling!.

And I tend not to bother with the mysterious P setting either. As I understand it, it measures the EV for the scene, chooses an aperture and shutter speed for you, and you can scroll through alternative combinations that give the equivalent EV by turning the command dial. Better, I say, to take charge of one or the other upfrontJoe prefers shutter speed, I prefer aperture. You say tomayto, I say tomotto..

I also tend to avoid the ISO auto setting like the plague. In the early days with my D70, before I fully appreciated digital noise, I botched many an otherwise good pic because I chose or I let the camera choose an ISO that was higher than really necessary. I have my D40 set to ISO 200 and the D80 set to ISO 100 as baselines and increase that only as necessaryand I like to go about 800 only with a darn good reason, and I like to control when..

It is fun I think to learn a little about the math of exposure, too. The brightness of a picture is a factor of the sensitivity of the sensor and how much light for how long falls on it. So lets say my camera tells me that to get good exposure of subject I need f/4 aperture and 1/200 sec shutter speed at ISO 400. Lets say I close my aperture what photographers call one full stop (equivalent to a change of -1 EV). One full stop means reducing the diameter of the aperture by a factor of roughly the square root of two so the area of the aperture is halvedremember from high school math that the area of a circle is proportional to the square of it's diameter, so when we divide the diameter by the square root of two we divide the area by 2. The square root of two is roughly 1.4, so one full stop smaller is f/(4x1.4) = f/5.6.

Thus one full stop with respect to shutter speed means halving or doubling the duration. Alternatively, one can make the sensor twice as sensitive, in this case increasing the ISO to 800. Doubling or halving ISO sensitivity is equivalent to one full stop, or 1 EV unit, of exposure change. Of course, the D40 and D80 refine this to gradations of roughly 1/3 a stop, and the D80 even permits adjusting the defaults so you can change ISO, shutter speed, and aperture in gradations of 1/2 a stop. But the basic underlying principle is pretty neat and pretty nifty..

The digital SLRs permit us to take charge of two of these three determinants of exposure and let the camera select the third. Knowing how they interplay has really helped me take more pleasing pictures. I will never make a career of photography, and my photos won't win awards, but the sense of creative control is gratifying. I have a perfectly fine Sony Cybershot, but despite it's small size and convenience I never use it. This is more fun. And as consumer DSLRs like the D40 get better and cheaper, I think more people who want to take the best pictures they can afford rather than just conveniently capturing moments will discover this is the way to go..

Happy snapping!.

Les..

Comment #16

I normally shoot aperature priority. Part of the reason is historical, I always used Pentax film cameras which were aperature priority and since depth of field is normally what I want to control, it made sense to continue in that mode. When I'm shooting indoor events however, where the light is uneven and I want to maintain good controil over the exposure of the faces, I shoot in manual after figuring out the appropriate settings.Duncan Bristowhttp://www.pbase.com/duncanbristow..

Comment #17

Mikelis wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

There is really only "two" modes .... Aperture or Shutter priority..

I said there was only "two" modes ... (Aperture and Shutter priority)... I do not consider "Program" a mode. It does nothing but convertyour very-expensive professional-level DSLR into a cheap P&S..

There really are only two modes: "Manual", and everything else(resulting in "automatic exposure")..

"Everything else" can be contained in (dealt with) by "ProgrammeShift" (ie, the camera is in "P mode", but turning the wheel rotatesyou through the different equivalent aperture/shutter combinationsfor the scene. (Av and Tv "modes" are only really a "variation" of P)..

That is to say: there's Manual and Auto (although Auto has somesub-categories with varying degrees of "sophistication").

Hence "Aperture" and "Shutter priority" are not so much "modes" as"sub-modes" of "Automatic Exposure Mode".

I was probably wrong to not mention Manual mode..

I suggest you are correct that the actual two modes are indeed Manual and Auto.(With A, S, and the various P modes being "sub" modes of Auto.).

I was ASS-U-ME-ing he was only meaning the Auto (non-thinking) modes..

But I still insist that basic "P" mode still returns your camera to a simple P&S ... UNLESS you indeed use the manual over-ride knobs ... but then I suggest you are going back to a more MANUAL mode since you are forcing your specific shutter-speed/aperture anyway..

In that case the original OP question changes from what (auto) mode do you use to which shutter-speed and aperture is used for specific applications..

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #18

Manual mode..

I like to think of it as Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority all-in-one. If there is enough lighting, I usually set my Aperture value first. If there isn't enough lighting, then I set my Shutter value first knowing that I need to select a shutter speed fast enough to keep the images sharp but slow enough to let enough light in. If there's still not enough light, then I adjust my EV compensation values until there's enough light. For just about every shot I take, I check with the histogram to see what kind of effect my settings have on the exposure. The histogram is one of the most useful tools to me in the field and in post-processing..

I think I shoot in manual mode more so than any other mode because I feel quite confident in my intuition for setting the camera to get the shot that I'm looking for. I generally shoot to depict a certain style for a given scene, or to obtain a certain artistic effect, not to slavishly get a "perfect exposure" according to what the metering system says each time..

Brandon..

Comment #19

Depends on which camera..

My Canon S70 P&S? Its on Full Automatic most of the time. Sometimes I'll put in in Shutter Priority mode if I've had to much coffee... (grin).

My Canon Xti? Its in Manual most of the time. I find that I want to control the DOF AND the shutter speed..

Technologist @ Large- Mark0..

Comment #20

Outdoors in bright sun I generally shoot in Av near middle aperture (sweet spot) to take advantage of the sharpest quality of the lens and let the camera select the shutter speed which normally is very fast..

Av even for sports/action but at the widest aperture of the lens so the camera will select the fastest shutter speed for the proper exposure..

Tv on those occasions when long shutter speeds are desirable for soft waterfalls, or night scenes.M when certain situations call for custom or unusual settings like moon shots..

Never use A but occasionally P when I need a fast shot, feel lazy or when I let someone else use the camera.Regards,Hank..

Comment #21

Like Joe I tend to shy away from the preprogrammed modes. I actuallyfind for me they complicate thingsjust look at the D40 or D70 orD80 manual at the tables that list endlessly the defaults for thevarious modes. And think of all of entries in the menu itemdescriptions that mention that a particular feature is disabled,enabled, or behaves in a different way depending on the preprogrammedmode. Boggling!.

I agree, I also find pre-program mode does not make it any easier to use..

And I tend not to bother with the mysterious P setting either. As Iunderstand it, it measures the EV for the scene, chooses an apertureand shutter speed for you, and you can scroll through alternativecombinations that give the equivalent EV by turning the command dial.Better, I say, to take charge of one or the other upfrontJoeprefers shutter speed, I prefer aperture. You say tomayto, I saytomotto..

I used to shoot A mode most of the time and yes I can shoot almost any situation using the A mode. But now, before taking pictures, I'd like to think which is the most important factor in the aperture triangle that I need to put more attention to and select the mode that gives me the easiest way to control it..

I also tend to avoid the ISO auto setting like the plague. In theearly days with my D70, before I fully appreciated digital noise, Ibotched many an otherwise good pic because I chose or I let thecamera choose an ISO that was higher than really necessary. I have myD40 set to ISO 200 and the D80 set to ISO 100 as baselines andincrease that only as necessaryand I like to go about 800 only witha darn good reason, and I like to control when..

I found that using auto ISO very useful and can let me use the lowest possible ISO if I know when and how to use it. As an example, in changing low light shooting, I can manually choose ISO 800, A mode at f/2.8 and get the pictures shot at shutter speed from 1/250s to 1/400s. Or in S mode at 1/250s and get the pictures shot at aperture from f/4 to f/2.8. All shots will be at manually set ISO 800. By using auto ISO, I dial to M mode, f/2.8 1/250s. I will get pictures with the ISO varies between ISO 400 to ISO 800, getting some shots with lower ISO.



The digital SLRs permit us to take charge of two of these threedeterminants of exposure and let the camera select the third. Knowinghow they interplay has really helped me take more pleasing pictures..

This is the way I shoot in auto/semi-auto mode, taking control two of the exposure triangle and let the camera select the third. The ISO is set manually, in A mode the camera selects the shutter speed, in S mode, the camera selects the aperture. In M mode with auto ISO, I let the camera selects the ISO, which is the minimum for optimum exposure at the selected aperture and shutter speed..

Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00..

Comment #22

Hc4n4 wrote:.

I found that using auto ISO very useful and can let me use the lowestpossible ISO if I know when and how to use it. As an example, inchanging low light shooting, I can manually choose ISO 800, A mode atf/2.8 and get the pictures shot at shutter speed from 1/250s to1/400s. Or in S mode at 1/250s and get the pictures shot at aperturefrom f/4 to f/2.8. All shots will be at manually set ISO 800. Byusing auto ISO, I dial to M mode, f/2.8 1/250s. I will get pictureswith the ISO varies between ISO 400 to ISO 800, getting some shotswith lower ISO.



Are you talking about low light OUTDOOR shooting? If you are talking indoors then you are using some fast lens .

Inspired by your post I chased the cats around tonight in Manual Mode + auto ISO. The fastest lens I have is a 70mm f/2.8 Sigma macro. At f/2.8 and 1/60s the camera chose nothing slower than ISO 1600, and the pics were correspondingly grainy and often under exposed, meaning that my amount of light had hit the lower threshold of metering for my settings..

I take it that and f/2.8 aperture does not have the same absolute EV at all focal lengths. I would assume than a wide angle macro lens lets in more light at f/2.8 than my portrait lens does with it's 70mm. I think I need to do a little more research about the relationship between lens focal length and lens speed. Either that or turn more lights on around the house whilst snapping the cats .

Thanks for your insights. I will try them out..

Les..

Comment #23

Are you talking about low light OUTDOOR shooting? If you are talkingindoors then you are using some fast lens .

Inspired by your post I chased the cats around tonight in Manual Mode+ auto ISO. The fastest lens I have is a 70mm f/2.8 Sigma macro. Atf/2.8 and 1/60s the camera chose nothing slower than ISO 1600, andthe pics were correspondingly grainy and often under exposed, meaningthat my amount of light had hit the lower threshold of metering formy settings..

If it is too dark even for the highest ISO, auto ISO cannot do any magic. Home lighting is usually too dark for shooting with only available light, even with fast lens, unless you have the option for even much higher ISO setting like the D3 has..

My point is about the benefit of auto ISO feature. I found many people do not want to use the feature because they are afraid the camera selects unnecessarily high ISO while actually the auto ISO selects the lowest possible ISO for optimal exposure..

Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00..

Comment #24

I started a thread how I use manual mode and auto ISO for shooting a band performance. If you are interested, follow the link below..

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1034&message=25561501Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00..

Comment #25

I see what you meanyour idea of low light and home lighting are obvious too different things .

It looks to me that the hall where you shot the musicians was pretty brightly lit and open. I am really impressed you were able keep the ISO so low, but it does seem the lighting was on your side..

I will try a bit more a shooting with manual + auto ISO, preferably under better conditions. FWIW, I have discovered that both my D40 and D80 permit one to select a maximum ISO sensitivity, and in any case the maximum is 1600 (the crazy H0.3, H0.7, and H1 on the D80 are not available in auto ISO mode). Also, here is a pitch to D40 userswhen you select ISO manually, only full stops are available200, 400, 800, 1600. But it seems to me that if you set the camera to auto ISO, fractions of a stop for the ISO of shot start showing up in the metadata. So, on the D40, it seems that only auto ISO mode permits as smooth a change in ISO sensitivity as in aperture and shutter speed!.

Thanks again for the tip...

Comment #26

I just stepped out on the front porch and shot a few random picks of various thingstrees, a car, a fence. It is a cold overcast day so I set the D40 to 1/125s, f/5.6, and auto ISO. The resultant pics had a camera-selected ISO ranging from 320 to 1600. It is noteworthy that 320, 360, and 450 were selected for some shots. These ISOs are not accessible to the user in manual ISO mode on the D40.

Looks like you are on to something! D40 users take note. This will certainly change how I take pics, certainly ones in daylight!.

Many thanks again,.

Les..

Comment #27

This is the way I shoot in auto/semi-auto mode, taking control two ofthe exposure triangle and let the camera select the third. The ISOis set manually, in A mode the camera selects the shutter speed, in Smode, the camera selects the aperture. In M mode with auto ISO, Ilet the camera selects the ISO, which is the minimum for optimumexposure at the selected aperture and shutter speed..

Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00.

Thank you for your sharingCannot disagreed about using auto for 1 of 3 factors to shootOOPSOS..

Comment #28

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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