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What is your opinion on also using film?
Hi all!.

Now I know some might think I am taking a step back, but I am considering trying film photography as part of my hobby..

I will mainly be using digital, because in my line of work (where I intend using it) it is more convenient and way more economical..

But I have this sentimentality about film. My dad of course only had the chance to use film, wouldn't be able to afford digital cameras anyway. But it just feels more real to me, more honest..

Where I live film is still widely available and film cameras are becoming incredibly cheap..

The course I am starting deals with film just as much as digital, it will actually teach me how to develop it myself..

Would you recommend me trying film also, and if yes, which film camera was or is your favourite...

Comments (11)

The only decisive thing tilting balance in favour of digital is: It helps preserve original image quality AS IT IS conveniently and cost/time effectively. All other factors (image preview, ease of editing etc..) are incidental.Another major factor is ease of changing ISO.So if one can afford a digicam, no need to look back..

Christine Manley wrote:.

Hi all!.

Now I know some might think I am taking a step back, but I amconsidering trying film photography as part of my hobby..

I will mainly be using digital, because in my line of work (where Iintend using it) it is more convenient and way more economical..

But I have this sentimentality about film. My dad of course only hadthe chance to use film, wouldn't be able to afford digital camerasanyway. But it just feels more real to me, more honest..

Where I live film is still widely available and film cameras arebecoming incredibly cheap..

The course I am starting deals with film just as much as digital, itwill actually teach me how to develop it myself..

Would you recommend me trying film also, and if yes, which filmcamera was or is your favourite..

Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #1

Christine Manley wrote:.

Hi all!.

Now I know some might think I am taking a step back, but I amconsidering trying film photography as part of my hobby..

I will mainly be using digital, because in my line of work (where Iintend using it) it is more convenient and way more economical..

But I have this sentimentality about film. My dad of course only hadthe chance to use film, wouldn't be able to afford digital camerasanyway. But it just feels more real to me, more honest..

Where I live film is still widely available and film cameras arebecoming incredibly cheap..

The course I am starting deals with film just as much as digital, itwill actually teach me how to develop it myself..

Would you recommend me trying film also, and if yes, which filmcamera was or is your favourite..

Sure play with film .... I did for 40 years..

Are you intending B&W or Color ??? And you are going to actually "develop" it yourself ???.

Film wise B&W is easy to develop .... color is more complicated but still possible; (temperature is critical)..

Printing B&W is also very easy, and you can use a "safelight" so you are not actually in the dark. Print processing is done in an open-tray and is FUN to watch as it "appears" magically before your eyes. (but remember, no safelight for film processing).

Color printing can also be done in a TRAY .... (but with NO SAFELIGHT). Color printing used to require "drums" and was very complicated, but the newer (RA4) chemistry can be done just as fast as B&W. The chemistry MUST BE "HEATED" but not as hot, nor as critical, as it once was..

You will of course need an "enlarger" for printing. B&W enlargers just had a "white" light, and there are special (colored) filters to change the "contrast" grade on special papers..

Color enlargers have special heads where the color of the light source can be changed. There are adjustments for Cyan, Yellow, Magenta. There are two types of color-heads .... most are "Subractive" .... some are "Additive". TRY TO FIND A "ADDITIVE" HEAD.

(albeit 99% are substractive).

Color enlargers can also be used for B&W, and there are "charts" where the normal "color" adjustments can be used INSTEAD OF THE FILTERS for the variable-contrast papers I mentioned earlier..

NOW ... back to PHOTOGRAPHY .....

If you are going to shoot B&W .... it is almost essential that you carry a RED or YELLOW filter. (and even GREEN, ORANGE or BLUE may be useful in different situations).

It is unimaginable how much a B&W photo can be changed with COLORED filters; (yeah, I know it does not make sense, but trust me on this)..

Imagine a minute you have two squares in front of you ... One is RED ... the other is GREEN. Red and Green appear very different to the eye. BUT ... if you think for a moment ...

A subjects "reflectivity"..

So the result is that both squares may indeed photograph in the exact same shade-of-gray, and actually be indistinguishable from each other..

BUT ... if you mount a RED filter ... and take that same photo .... the result is that the Red panel will now photograph as "white" while the green panel will be "black". (conversely, the green filter will produce the exact opposite result).

SO ... you can use a GREEN filter, and make green-TREES appear "white" in the photo..

The most common use of filters is SKY, (with clouds). We look at a "blue" sky and seen pretty clouds .... BUT ... the fact is that both the blue sky and the clouds also are about the SAME BRIGHTNESS OF LIGHT ... So the result is that clouds simply do not appear in most B&W photos. If you mount a RED or DEEP YELLOW filter ....

(the darker-Red is the most effective cause a "blue" sky is actually "cyan" which is the exact opposite of red).

Have FUN.

Ask if you have any more specific questions. Maybe I can help ....

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #2

Christine Manley wrote:.

Hi all!.

Now I know some might think I am taking a step back, but I amconsidering trying film photography as part of my hobby..

I will mainly be using digital, because in my line of work (where Iintend using it) it is more convenient and way more economical..

But I have this sentimentality about film. My dad of course only hadthe chance to use film, wouldn't be able to afford digital camerasanyway. But it just feels more real to me, more honest..

Where I live film is still widely available and film cameras arebecoming incredibly cheap..

The course I am starting deals with film just as much as digital, itwill actually teach me how to develop it myself..

Would you recommend me trying film also, and if yes, which filmcamera was or is your favourite..

Hi Christine,.

I think you've been fortunate in your DSLR choice, isn't there some degree of back and forth usability of lenses between the GX10 and Pentax's film SLRs?.

While the classic student's camera used to be the Pentax K1000, I was a child of my times and always hungered after the tiny MX. Today you might want to consider something a bit more modern, with 'better' features like AF and autoexposure..

On the other hand, would you perhaps get more experience, and more differentiation from your digital output, with a 6x6 twin-lens reflex like the old Yashicamat G or a Rollei? The larger 120 film size would be more costly per shot (and might prove a problem for printing), but it's easier to scan and work on digitally than 35mm. Just depends on what you want to achieve ....

Take a look here for shots taken with many old film cameras, comments on their use today and loads of general inspiration! http://westfordcomp.com/holga/index.html.

Do have a go - and why not involve your father, and learn from his experience? Maybe you could even start by borrowing his camera - certainly better than laying out too much money before you're convinced..

Have fun!Peter.

Peter - on the green island of Ischiahttp://www.pbase.com/isolaverde..

Comment #3

Unfortunately, my dad passed away about 10 years ago, so no help there.I do know that he first used Pentax before moving on to Nikon..

Apparently in his opinion, Nikon made the best cameras. It is now a very different ball game though, with digital entering the playing field, and also Canon and others have made wonderful advances since his days..

I do think I am fortunate in already having a camera wich uses all pentax lenses..

It is just so hard finding Pentax film cameras here, although Canon SLR film cameras are still fairly easy to find...

Comment #4

On the other hand, would you perhaps get more experience, and moredifferentiation from your digital output, with a 6x6 twin-lens reflexlike the old Yashicamat G or a Rollei? The larger 120 film size wouldbe more costly per shot (and might prove a problem for printing), butit's easier to scan and work on digitally than 35mm. Just depends onwhat you want to achieve ....

Parden my stupidity, but could you please explain -"with a 6x6 twin-lens reflex like the old Yashicamat G or a Rollei?"...

Comment #5

IMO, your first choice film camera should be a Leica M series rangefinder with a good Leica lens, but that is an expensive option even second hand. Drop dead gorgeous and uber-cool, however. Second choice would be a Zeiss Ikon rangefinder (new about 1/4 the cost of the Leica but not cheap). My reason for this choice is that the film SLR option, although much cheaper, does not really offer you anything extra compared to a dSLR, while the Leica and the Zeiss do - a sense that it is just you and the light...

Comment #6

Christine Manley wrote:.

On the other hand, would you perhaps get more experience, and moredifferentiation from your digital output, with a 6x6 twin-lens reflexlike the old Yashicamat G or a Rollei? The larger 120 film size wouldbe more costly per shot (and might prove a problem for printing), butit's easier to scan and work on digitally than 35mm. Just depends onwhat you want to achieve ....

Parden my stupidity, but could you please explain -"with a 6x6 twin-lens reflex like the old Yashicamat G or a Rollei?"..

My apologies, I misinterpreted your comment about your father..

Twin lens cameras use two lenses of identical focal length, mounted one above the other, in separate compartments - one is just for viewing and focusing the camera, the other (usually a better quality lens) actually forms the image on the film..

Most use 120 roll film rather than 35mm - which gives a larger negative (almost 6cm x 6cm, rather than 35mm's 3.6x2.4) that requires a lot less enlargement, rather like the difference between the fullframe and APSC sensors..

The Rolleiflex is the Rolls Royce of that sort of camera - and I say is because they're still making them! http://www.franke-heidecke.net/.

One user's pictures etchttp://westfordcomp.com/classics/rolleiflex/january2007/oldandnew.html.

However most users have something more humble, such as the Yashicamat 124G (got the name slightly wrong before):.

Http://www.photoethnography.com/...frameset.html?Yashicamat124.html~mainFrame.

Generally a lot slower to use than 35mm, but a completely different photographic experience which might complement your digital work rather than clash with it..

Hope that clear that up!.

Peter.

Peter - on the green island of Ischiahttp://www.pbase.com/isolaverde..

Comment #7

It does clear it up somewhat.Seems I have just as much (if not more) to learn about film than digital!Both are kinda confusing me right now..

First I need to focus on learning the digital camera I now have, then I can start indulging in film..

It is all so fascinating! But I can't go on a spending spree right this minute, so digital will do for now, that is after all where I will (hopefully) be making money in the long term. Film will just me my own little treat..

Thanx all for you help!..

Comment #8

Christine Manley wrote:.

It does clear it up somewhat.Seems I have just as much (if not more) to learn about film thandigital!Both are kinda confusing me right now..

First I need to focus on learning the digital camera I now have, thenI can start indulging in film..

It is all so fascinating! But I can't go on a spending spree rightthis minute, so digital will do for now, that is after all where Iwill (hopefully) be making money in the long term. Film will just memy own little treat..

Thanx all for you help!.

Best of luck!.

One last suggestion, a useful resource for seeing the kinds of results users get from varoius cameras and lenses.http://www.pbase.com/cameras.

Peter.

Peter - on the green island of Ischiahttp://www.pbase.com/isolaverde..

Comment #9

The trouble with using film... It DOES make you slow down, it DOES teach you more about the mechanics of photography than digital ever will, it DOES make you think before you press that little button - apart from that, there's nothing wrong with film. :~).

Don't let the nay-sayers stop you, film is still an extremely valid way of recording an image. You use the tool that will give you the results you want or need. Sometimes you need to learn how to use that tool effectively, but that's part of the challenge, as well as part of the fun. There are many working pros who still shoot film, and many more keen amateur enthusiasts as well. Film and digital, working together, can fill the gaps each has on their own..

Get a cheap, good SLR, a couple of good lenses, some good film (any of the Pro Grade stuff - you'll know it by the cost, but it's worth the extra), and go shoot..

Enjoy.Rob.

Everyone, everywhere, has to do everything for a first time. There is no shame in failure, only in failure to try...

Comment #10

Film is FUN! Give it a try..

I haven't been shooting nearly as long as some of the folks here, but I bought a Pentax MZ-M (a now discontinued manual focus model that replaced the K1000) going on 10 years ago..

Take a b&w class. They are very popular and offered by community colleges and local arts centers..

One thing that helped me learn was to take meticulous records of what you've done for every frame because you don't have the luxury of the camera recording it all for you...

Comment #11

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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