snubbr.com

what is the first filter I need?
I just picked up my Nikon D80 today and want to buy a filter ASAP. What is the first filter(s) I should get for mostly outdoor pet photos?..

Comments (9)

None. Maybe a polarizer later. Enjoy your new camera. Don't stick unneeded glass in front of those nice new lenses you just bought. Use your lens hoods that came with them to improve contrast and keep out flare. A circular polarizer will reduce your incoming light by at least a stop and a half leaving you with a very dark image in the view finder.

Reflections aren't always unwanted. Your kit lenses are very sharp but they are slow. Don't slow them down more unless for a very good reason. You should know the reason. If you don't, then don't get a filter just to have them..

Every time you put a filter on, you're possibly reducing light and increasing the possibility of flare and loss of contrast. If you need one for a specific purpose, go ahead, but know that purpose and understand the compromise..

Filters 101: http://www.bythom.com/filters.htmCheers, Craig..

Comment #1

I appreciate the advice, thank you. What I was more concerned about was protecting my glass. The guy behind the counter that sold me the camera was pretty hard sell on trying to get me to purchase filters for that purpose. Of course I realize he was trying to increase his sale also but he went as far as to tell me to not even take any pictures until I had a filter in place to protect the lens from dust. Hogwash?..

Comment #2

Bayberry wrote:.

I appreciate the advice, thank you. What I was more concerned aboutwas protecting my glass. The guy behind the counter that sold me thecamera was pretty hard sell on trying to get me to purchase filtersfor that purpose. Of course I realize he was trying to increase hissale also but he went as far as to tell me to not even take anypictures until I had a filter in place to protect the lens from dust.Hogwash?.

Yes, total hogwash. It's a great way to raise his commission with high profit items. This is often argued here and elsewhere. Many photographers have been brainwashed over the years to believe that a paper thin piece of glass will somehow protect a hard, thick front element. Some even will show you a broken filter and claim that it actually protected something. Your lens hood does a good job unless your kid throws a diamond studded missile that sneaks through the hood.

LOL.

Very expensive filters that are multi coated may not effect image quality as much as cheaper filters, but, IMO, should only be used when you're in areas like the beach where wind blown salt air might effect something. Maybe a sand storm. I don't even then. Wind, sand and salt spray can enter lots more places than the front element of a lens, if you aren't careful and the beach as more sun and reflections to cause flare. If you are going to want a filter at the beach or in the middle of a sand storm, a polarizer will probably do more anyway..

The down side is that filters increase the possibility of flare and internal reflections which rob contrast. Sometimes people complain about their images and after a while remove the filter and are excited on the quality their lenses perform. Read that article I send by Thom Hogan..

Every time you put a filter on, you're possibly reducing light and increasing the possibility of flare and loss of contrast. If you need one for a specific purpose, go ahead, but know that purpose and understand the compromise..

You're going to hear from people like that salesman who insist that protective filters should go on all lenses. If you go that way, after some time, take them off and see your photography improve..

Just keep a lens cleaning micro cloth and lens fluid in your bag and clean them every so often.Cheers, Craig..

Comment #3

Bayberry wrote:.

I appreciate the advice, thank you. What I was more concerned aboutwas protecting my glass. The guy behind the counter that sold me thecamera was pretty hard sell on trying to get me to purchase filtersfor that purpose. Of course I realize he was trying to increase hissale also but he went as far as to tell me to not even take anypictures until I had a filter in place to protect the lens from dust.Hogwash?.

Yes, complete hogwash, and the salesman either knows it (in which case he is trying to con you) or sincerely believes it (in which case he is too ignorant to be selling cameras to people). The prices of cameras are now so competitive that he probably makes more commission on selling the filter than the camera. For general protection of the front lens element form occasional knocks, a lens hood, which you should use as a matter of course, works fine. A clear filter for protection would be worthwhile if you are in dusty conditions, or with a lot of water spray about, otherwise it's unnecessary..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #4

I did get myself Hoya Pro1 Clear Protector for my lenses. Not sure if it's worth it. But I just think that if I were to go to the beach or other places with harsh conditions, it's better to protect my lens. Other than that, I'd still try to shoot without filters.....

Comment #5

If this is your first expensive camera and you are clumsy / adventurous or not always lucky, get a reasonable brand (e.g. Hoya), minimal cost UV filter. Put it on mostly, when you know you want to take a really good shot, take it off. After you have got dust, smog, rain etc.... on it, you learn how to clean it - once you have done that a few times, and you're sure that you've graduated take it off permanently..

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/http://olympuse510.wikispaces.com/http://picasaweb.google.com/AnandaSim/http://www.flickr.com/photos/32554587@N00/..

Comment #6

AnandaSim wrote:.

If this is your first expensive camera and you are clumsy /adventurous or not always lucky, get a reasonable brand (e.g. Hoya),minimal cost UV filter. Put it on mostly, when you know you want totake a really good shot, take it off. After you have got dust, smog,rain etc.... on it, you learn how to clean it - once you have donethat a few times, and you're sure that you've graduated take it offpermanently..

I can't agree with deliberately putting something on a lens that you will take off whenever you want a "really good" shot. I want all my shots "really good"..

I use no filters for protection. I use polarizers and neutral density filters for deliberate effects, but I don't want to degrade my lenses in any way - ever..

Nothing is enough for the man to whom nothing is enough...

Comment #7

If you are trying to protect kit lens, don't buy too expensive filter - lens quality is not worth it..

If you want to have any gain from having first filter, buy polarizing filter. Use it outdoors during sunny days. Rotate front element to have blue skies. It will help control reflections and reduce glare from leaves for example..

Remove filter when shoting indoors since it reducing light amount by 1/2 stop at least..

Inexpensive Sunpack or Quantaray polarizing filter purchased in BestBuy or RitzCamera will work well enough..

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #8

Aletheia wrote:.

AnandaSim wrote:.

If this is your first expensive camera and you are clumsy /adventurous or not always lucky, get a reasonable brand (e.g. Hoya),minimal cost UV filter. Put it on mostly, when you know you want totake a really good shot, take it off. After you have got dust, smog,rain etc.... on it, you learn how to clean it - once you have donethat a few times, and you're sure that you've graduated take it offpermanently..

I can't agree with deliberately putting something on a lens that youwill take off whenever you want a "really good" shot. I want all myshots "really good"..

So do I. An inexpensive UV filter isn't necessarily like putting the bottom of a Coke bottle on you lens. I grapple more with light, time of day, location to the sun, weather, dust and moisture in the air and just plain finger grease decreasing IQ then a thin, optically flat filter..

I use no filters for protection. I use polarizers and neutraldensity filters for deliberate effects, but I don't want to degrademy lenses in any way - ever..

I envy you.I am moderately clumsyI am moderately unluckyI am not adventurous but I do get myself into situations where it rains.

I'm pragmatic enough to know that I have scratched five UV filters since 1976 and have not scratched the lenses that were behind them.

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/http://olympuse510.wikispaces.com/http://picasaweb.google.com/AnandaSim/http://www.flickr.com/photos/32554587@N00/..

Comment #9

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.