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What is a good worklfow
Hi all, wondering what sort of PP workflow others use as I am wondering if I am being as efficient as I can be. Photos are purely amateur..

I have a 40D and have been doing the following....

1. Acquire the images through CameraWindow2. Weed out the trash in ZoomBrowser3. Process the keeper CR2's to JPG's using DPP4. Work on the special keepers in Elements and save to JPG again.5. I then take the JPG's, import to iPhoto, backup to ZenFolio.

6. At the end of each month I burn a DVD of all the RAW files for offsite storage..

Am I over complicating things here?.

Thoughts are appreciated..

Thanks,Shane.http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comments (17)

Mez wrote:.

Am I over complicating things here?.

Thoughts are appreciated..

I don't think that's overcomplicated at all. Fact is, if you want any sort of order rather than chaos, you need to be pretty organised - more so with digital than it was with film, really..

The details of how you work will vary depending on your personal needs and style, available equipment etc. Just about the only universal truths are- BACKUP - Keep your originals / don't overedit and re-save JPGs.

For what it's worth, here's an overview of my workflow:.

Day to day processing:.

1. Copy from card to computer (laptop) into "Photos to be filed" folder..

- I don't bother using software for file transfer, just slot the card into the laptop card reader and drag/drop/organise using standard Windows functions..

2. Rename to my standard naming convention using Bulk Rename Utility..

3. View in Windows and cull the absolute failures..

4. Import to Photoshop Elements and catalogue / assign tags..

5. Cull again in Elements, tagging the discards as "Discard" rather than delete them straight way (because I'm cautious!).

6. Move (using Photoshop) the files from "Photos to be filed" folder to their permanent home(s) in my folder structure..

6. Full backup of the Photoshop Catalogue to external hard disk- Maintaining several generations of this backup.(I don't like incremental backups).

- Or, if time is short, just copy the current folder (e.g. "2007") to the external HDD..

7. Select and print 6x4s with miminal post processing (just crop and Levels, usually).

- These go into the family album and/or provide proofs for considering what pp might be needed for the "keepers"..

- Up to this point it's really about capturing and sotring/cataloguing the photos as quickly as possible, then getting down to:.

8. At a more leisurely pace, review and edit each "keeper" with a view to producing "one for the wall". I keep these prints in portfolios and periodically mount / frame / rotate them to and from display..

Periodic Processing / Cleanup (in no particular order):.

1. Review Discards category and delete the images..

2. Full backup of Photoshop Catalogue to DVD..

- I maintain multiple generations of rewritable DVDs plus the occasional archive to write-only DVD..

3. Move older files from laptop drive to external HDD.

(So I can play with the latest files wherever I am, but keep the majority of the storage volume off the laptop).

4. Move selected images offline to DVD (and make multiple copies of that DVD).

- to keep the volume of online storage manageable - ie that the full backup of the Photoshop catalogue can be done on a reasonable number of DVDs..

For what it's worth .

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Comment #1

This might be of some use to someone:.

-1, Think about it carefully before squeezing the trigger..

0, Squeeze trigger.

1, Download to folder for each camera. Repeat for another folder called (in my version)"2007" or whatever. The 2007 folder has all the pictures from all the cameras (mine and my wife's) and is sorted in date and time order. NB When going out with three cameras between two of you get the date and times synchronised..

1a, Leave the original RAW's in the camera folder and use the jpg's or whatever for the folder "2007"..

2, Re-number to suit as the makers' numbering can add to the confusion..

3, Look at them and weed out duplicates (usually caused by maker's numbering). I make a point of downloading the last one of the previous session just to be certain the previous session was completely downloaded. The duplicate search will double check it..

4, Check the numbers carefully. Or are there 100 pictures between number 1 and number 100? And a thousand between 001 and 1000?.

5, Duplicate to external drive for a bit of a back up but don't ever rely on one back-up..

6, Make slight adjustments to ones being printed ie crop to fit paper (most of the time) and save in folder called "Printed". Otherwise you'll have to do it again and again. It might mean a copy duplicated as (say) Pic 007 (A4).jpg and Pic 007 (4x6).jpg but so what..

Also, it means you still have the original untouched in the cameras' folder and the original still in the "2007" folder. You cannot have too many back-ups..

7, Burn on to CD at short intervals from the camera folders. Burn on to DVD at longer intervals. (Called not putting all your eggs in one basket, when my mother was a little girl.).

8, Thin out rubbish a year down the line (because you never know what is or isn't rubbish when too near the event and your wife will think otherwise anyway)..

9, Thin out the thinned out and burn again on to CD's to make a set you grab when the house catches fire or to store in the fire-proof safe. NB a DVD would do but look how many you lose if a DVD fails....

10, Feel rather smug when the hard drive fails (again) and try not to think about how long it will take to copy them from the DVD's or CD's on to the new HDD..

Regards, David.

PS Yes, I know there's nothing about editing is there? But this old git tries hard not to take duds by thinking and walking about for a better viewpoint, framing, checking exposure etc, before taking the picture. And when they sort out the muddle over aspect ratios of paper, CCD's etc, I shall have even less work to do...

Comment #2

Thanks guys, doesn't look like I am too far off the track but some very useful tips!.

Regards,Shane.http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #3

Mez wrote:.

Hi all, wondering what sort of PP workflow others use as I amwondering if I am being as efficient as I can be. Photos are purelyamateur..

I have a 40D and have been doing the following....

1. Acquire the images through CameraWindow2. Weed out the trash in ZoomBrowser3. Process the keeper CR2's to JPG's using DPP4. Work on the special keepers in Elements and save to JPG again..

Well, if I get it right, you save as jpg, edit, than save again. Not a good ideea to use jpg for files you will further save. You loose _some_ quality. Might be significant or not, depending to your application..

/d/n..

Comment #4

Hmmm I see what you mean, but what is the alternative? You can't work on a RAW file in elements can you?.

Thanks again,Shane.http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #5

Use TIFF. They take up a lot of space, but are lossless and pretty universally supported...

Comment #6

Mez wrote:.

Hmmm I see what you mean, but what is the alternative? You can'twork on a RAW file in elements can you?.

Yes you can. You may need to download the latest version of Adobe Camera Raw from the Adobe website. It's free. They release new versions periodically, to cater for new cameras / raw formats as they appear..

Or, as another poster has noted, when you convert from raw, save the result as a TIFF or some other non-lossy format..

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Comment #7

Hmmm, OK. I'm at work so I can't check this but I thought when I opened the RAW file in elements (made WB adjustments etc) that when it opened into elements proper it was a JPG file ... i.e. by using Canon's DPP I was just replacing one RAW converter with another and that both produced JPG's..

Sorry for all htis confusion I am creating!http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #8

Shane, when you are working with DPP are you going through each photograph and doing adjustments to the RAW or are you batch processing them either with 'use camera settings' or adjust 1 and copy/paste recipe to the others?.

I will either take the pictures using RAW+jpg, or RAW and batch convert to jpg using DPP or Zoombrowser. I use the jpg's for viewing, small prints etc..

For the pictures I like I will adjust RAW in DPP, then transfer to Photoshop for further adjustments. You might have to save as TIFF then open in Elements..

I try and limit adjustments to ones I will print at 8x10 or larger..

Tony..

Comment #9

Mez wrote:.

Hmmm, OK. I'm at work so I can't check this but I thought when Iopened the RAW file in elements (made WB adjustments etc) that whenit opened into elements proper it was a JPG file ... i.e. by usingCanon's DPP I was just replacing one RAW converter with another andthat both produced JPG's..

Well I'm a bit of a newbie in this area myself, and I'm working from memory - but in general I think this is the story:.

When you're in Elements (Organiser) and you open (Edit) a raw file, the Adobe Camera Raw plugin opens automatically. You can then make adjustments and save the image in a variety of formats. This includes JPG but can also include Adobe DNG or TIFF. Then you can open the output file in the Elements Editor proper (or, when you save the file and close ACR, you drop in to the Elements Editor automatically, I can't remember which..

Anyway, bottom line is, you should be able to choose which format you save from the ACR plugin, and then transfer into the Elements Editor. It doesn't have to be JPG..

No need to apologise for confusion  we all can learn from this sort of discussion by either listening to others or trying to explain ourselves. Cheers..

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Comment #10

Hey thanks, appreciate all the feedback. I can see in DPP that I can choose a number of outputs ... two are....

Exif-TIFF 8bitTIFF 16bit.

I assume I would use the 8bit version?.

Http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #11

Mez wrote:.

Hey thanks, appreciate all the feedback. I can see in DPP that I canchoose a number of outputs ... two are....

Exif-TIFF 8bitTIFF 16bit.

I assume I would use the 8bit version?.

You have just exceeded the bounds of my expertise .

As a starting point I would say that in theory at least, the 16-bit version retains more information (in terms of the range of colours) than the 8 bit version. But.

(a) this may not be noticeable in the final result - it looks like a lot of difference "wow, twice as many bits!" but the effect is not as great as you might expect(b) it depends on whether Elements can read the 16 bit version. Don't know..

Beyond that, I'll have to leave it to others more knowledgeable than me..

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Comment #12

Yeah I was thinking Elements wouldn't read 16bit - will experiment tonight when I get home!http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #13

If batch processing, which I assume means applying the same adjustments to each raw file, then why bother?.

The point of raw, surely, is that you look at each picture and adjust everything individually to get perfection (or what you like and call "perfection"). Your camera can apply the same adjustments to each file and save it as a jpg. That's what it's all about and you can chose the adjustments from a reasonably wide range. In other words; your camera has built in batch processing. Experiment, if you're not sure..

As for saving as jpg's, look at the "Save" and "Save As" windows and you'll probably see "Options" and within that "JPG Compression". Go there and chose lowest compression and highest quality. That way the jpg's come out bigger than they went in and so I doubt if you lose much detail..

Trouble is, a few makers dislike jpg's and so offer you poor choices for the camera's compression. Get a camera with a reasonable range of choices for sharpness, contrast etc and a reasonable range of compressions for the jpg and you'll only need to use raw as a tool for dealing with tricky lighting situations. Assuming you get the WB, AF and exposure right in the first place but, as I see it, raw isn't there to make up for poor technique by repairing badly taken pictures..

Just my 2d worth..

Regards, David..

Comment #14

David Hughes wrote:.

If batch processing, which I assume means applying the sameadjustments to each raw file, then why bother?.

The point of raw, surely, is that you look at each picture and adjusteverything individually to get perfection (or what you like and call"perfection"). Your camera can apply the same adjustments to eachfile and save it as a jpg. That's what it's all about and you canchose the adjustments from a reasonably wide range. In other words;your camera has built in batch processing. Experiment, if you're notsure..

Sorry, I wasn't clear... - Canon's DPP has a thing called "Batch Process". Basically you can open a number of RAW files, adjust them (individually) and process them all at once to JPG or TIFF..

As for saving as jpg's, look at the "Save" and "Save As" windows andyou'll probably see "Options" and within that "JPG Compression". Gothere and chose lowest compression and highest quality. That way thejpg's come out bigger than they went in and so I doubt if you losemuch detail..

Yeah when I save in PSE I always go for maximum quality - Copressionwiseyou only get a choice of 'standard' or 'optimised'..

Trouble is, a few makers dislike jpg's and so offer you poor choicesfor the camera's compression. Get a camera with a reasonable range ofchoices for sharpness, contrast etc and a reasonable range ofcompressions for the jpg and you'll only need to use raw as a toolfor dealing with tricky lighting situations. Assuming you get the WB,AF and exposure right in the first place but, as I see it, raw isn'tthere to make up for poor technique by repairing badly taken pictures..

I have a 40D so have all the choices under the sun. As an pure amateur I prefer to leave the WB set to auto and concentrate on he effect I am trying to achieve through apperture and shutter-speed. I figure WB is easy to change if I like whereas DoF can really only be done in camera and I already have enough to concentarte on!!!.

Just my 2d worth..

Really appreciated!.

Regards, David.

Regards,Shanehttp://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #15

OMG! The TIFF files are humoungous!!!.

My 11.4Mb RAW file turned into a 29Mb TIFF file! Still, that's OK if I am going o pocess and then save as JPG - one less lossy save than I was doing before - thanks all for the advice..

Shane...http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke..

Comment #16

Try selecting TIFF with compression. LZW is lossless..

Mez wrote:.

OMG! The TIFF files are humoungous!!!.

My 11.4Mb RAW file turned into a 29Mb TIFF file! Still, that's OK ifI am going o pocess and then save as JPG - one less lossy save than Iwas doing before - thanks all for the advice..

Shane...http://web.mac.com/shane.metzke.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #17

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