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What is a crop sensor camera- full frame?
Hi all,.

Real newbie here....

I keep reading people talk about a crop sensor camera as opposed to a full frame camera in regards to lenses..

Please tell me the difference and which cameras are either, especially the 40D..

As always, thank you all in advance,.

Steve..

Comments (28)

40D camera has 1.6x field of view crop.

Thats mean lenses will have 1.6 times limited angle coverage compare same lens on Full Frame(FF) camera body (Canon 5D for example.) or 35mm film camera body..

Basically speaking 50mm lens will provide same angle of view as 80mm lens on FF..

This could be beneficial while shoting wildlife since telephoto lenses will be 1.6 more powerful:400mm X 1.6 = 640.

Bad when shooting landscapes because wide angle lenses will not be so wide anymore....

17mm lens X 1.6 ~ 27mm.

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #1

Stan_P wrote:.

This could be beneficial while shoting wildlife since telephotolenses will be 1.6 more powerful:400mm X 1.6 = 640.

Carefull - that is a very misleading statement. The lens does not become more powerful. On a 1.6 sensor with the same pixel density as a full frame sensor a 400mm lens will caputre the exact same amount of detail on either sensor - the 1.6 crop sensor, however, will merely give a field of view equivalent to what you would see with a 640mm lens on a full frame sensor...

Comment #2

The sensor is the digital equilivant of the film surface in an slr. Full frame is the same as the 35mm film area the lens projects the image on in the camera. A 1.5 or 1.6 crop sensor is smaller than a full frame. In this pic the lens is projecting the full frame on the film plain and the sensor is smaller and records a smaller amount of the projected image..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

If you are using a 100mm lens you would get everything shown in the pic above with a full frame on a given print size. On the same print size with a 1.5 crop sensor you would get just the area shown in the center above. Remember both are on the same size print so the 1.5 crop is the equilivant of a 150mm lense on full frame. 100mm x 1.5 = 150mm.

Use the buying guide here to find out what cameras have what size sensor....

...Dennis..

Comment #3

5D DjD wrote:.

The sensor is the digital equilivant of the film surface in an slr.Full frame is the same as the 35mm film area the lens projects theimage on in the camera. A 1.5 or 1.6 crop sensor is smaller than afull frame. In this pic the lens is projecting the full frame on thefilm plain and the sensor is smaller and records a smaller amount ofthe projected image..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

If you are using a 100mm lens you would get everything shown in thepic above with a full frame on a given print size. On the same printsize with a 1.5 crop sensor you would get just the area shown in thecenter above. Remember both are on the same size print so the 1.5crop is the equilivant of a 150mm lense on full frame. 100mm x 1.5 =150mm.

Use the buying guide here to find out what cameras have what sizesensor....

...Dennis.

Thank you so much for the great explanation!!!.

So, given everything you said, is there a way to compensate for this "crop"...Either by having it in your head when you frame or by using a different lens....

Please explain. Thanks!.

Steve..

Comment #4

Once you start putting in deliberately confusing things like pixel density, all that is happening is some showing off by the hoilier than thous, completely missing the point of the original poster, but sqaying "boy, am I ever smart.".

This is a beginners forum, after all..

Want to fill the frame with your cow in the field? Use a 400mm lens on an F4 Nikon (which is a 35mm film model) or a 300mm lens on a D40x, and you'll be pretty close to filling the frame on whichever camera you have..

BAK..

Comment #5

Steve, try this one..

In the fairly recent old days, 35mm cameras were the most common cameras with interchangable lenses..

They used film that provined a negative or a slide that was 24 x 36 mm in size..

Over the years, photographers who used these cameras got a good idea of how much subject they could get into their pictures using different focal length lenses..

For instance, standing on the other side of the street, they got their whole house, and half the neighbor's house, with a 35mm lens..

With a 50mm lens, they got just their house..

With a 105 mm lens, they got the entranceway and part of the porch..

So, with practice, they knew what lens to take out of the bag depending on how much they wanted in the picture, and where they wanted to stand..

NOTE: a 35mm lens is a focal length and a 35mm camera refers to a film size..

When digital cameras came out, the sensor inside, which is the electroonic "film" was smaller than the 24 x 36mm area of 35mm film..

So, in order for experienced 35mm film photographers to have a clue about where to stand and how much they would get into the shot, the camera and lens makers started telling us the "35mm equivilant.".

On a D40X, for instance, standing across the street and wanting to get just the porch area that would require a 105mm lens on a 35mm film camera, you'd use a 70mm lens (or zoom a lens to the 70-mm position) on your digital camera..

SINCE YOU ARE NEW... you have no reason in the world to use 35mm equivalents..

You have no experience understanding what subjects you get from where with lenses on 35mm cameras..

ALL YOU NEED TO DO is learn what focal length lenses on your new camera get however much subject, from however much distance..

To you, that entranceway shot is a 70mm shot, not the reason to start doing math and multiplication and division..

The house, plus the nighbor's house? That's a 20mm shot for you, and forget all the math that converts this to and from some film camera marking..

BAK..

Comment #6

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

5D DjD wrote:.

The sensor is the digital equilivant of the film surface in an slr.Full frame is the same as the 35mm film area the lens projects theimage on in the camera. A 1.5 or 1.6 crop sensor is smaller than afull frame. In this pic the lens is projecting the full frame on thefilm plain and the sensor is smaller and records a smaller amount ofthe projected image..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

If you are using a 100mm lens you would get everything shown in thepic above with a full frame on a given print size. On the same printsize with a 1.5 crop sensor you would get just the area shown in thecenter above. Remember both are on the same size print so the 1.5crop is the equilivant of a 150mm lense on full frame. 100mm x 1.5 =150mm.

Use the buying guide here to find out what cameras have what sizesensor....

...Dennis.

Thank you so much for the great explanation!!!.

So, given everything you said, is there a way to compensate for this"crop"...Either by having it in your head when you frame or by usinga different lens....

Please explain. Thanks!.

Steve.

Just be aware when shooting. If you go over the math ahead of time so that when you are shooting with a 50mm you know it's a 75mm equilivant with a 1.5 and 80mm with a 1.6 you won't go wrong. It really isn't even a problem unless you are coming from 35mm film into digital and are use to getting true 50mm from a 50mm lens....Dennis..

Comment #7

Steve,.

Viewfinder view of 40D you will be same in image captured into file after shutter button click..

Using same lens with Canon 5D or film camera - view will be wider and file will capture this wider view..

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #8

That is good explanation and advice.Being photographer myself more then tech expert, still learning every day.http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #9

Stan_P wrote:.

Steve,Viewfinder view of 40D you will be same in image captured into fileafter shutter button click..

Using same lens with Canon 5D or film camera - view will be wider andfile will capture this wider view..

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com.

So, I guess this is what I was really looking for as an explanation....

That, what I see through the viewfinder of my Canon 40D is what will show up after I download and look at it on a monitor (or print without doing any cropping)..

That, there is actually no need for any compensation in my head, my lens, my framing or anything else for that matter (considering I am NOT coming from the 35mm world)..

Please correct me if I am wrong..

Thanks to all (again),.

Steve..

Comment #10

Yes. Exactly right. Same final image as you will see in viewfinder..

Read BUK's last comment that is most clear explanation in my opinion....

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #11

Try looking at it the other way round. Full frame means what it says, the full frame is used. So with a 35 mm film camera you have a 24 x 36 mm frame and the lens covers it with an image about 43mm in diametre. Use the same lens on a digital camera with a smaller CCD or frame and you've cropped it (and you can ignore the expense of designing better & more appropriate lens for digital and go on using old designs). Some people say that the 35 mm film camera is the standard we all know and so quote lenses in terms of a 35 mm one and give a conversion factor for it. As you've seen in previous posts..

Old gits like me think in terms of what they see through the viewfinder and know that most 35 mm film cameras had 42, 45 or 50 mm lenses as normal, and 6 x 6 cameras had 75 or 80mm as normal (usually f/28 btw) and 5"x 4" had 135 mm and so on. In short we think in terms of the format and don't bother with mental arithmetic..

BTW, some of us have seen 35 mm cameras that are/were 24 mm by 32 mm or 4:3 aspect ratio. And there's 58 mm by 24 mm on 35 mm film and so on. How does half frame compare with half plate for instance? And what about 8 mm x 11 m as a film size? The more you look the more complicated it gets..

Nowadays a lot of people do the same with CCD sizes but it doesn't hurt to know that the 2/3" CCD format should be multiplied by 4 for 35 mm film sizes and the "FourThirds" standard lenses need to be multiplied by 2 and so on..

Regards, David..

Comment #12

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

Stan_P wrote:.

Steve,Viewfinder view of 40D you will be same in image captured into fileafter shutter button click..

Using same lens with Canon 5D or film camera - view will be wider andfile will capture this wider view..

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com.

So, I guess this is what I was really looking for as an explanation....

That, what I see through the viewfinder of my Canon 40D is what willshow up after I download and look at it on a monitor (or printwithout doing any cropping)..

That, there is actually no need for any compensation in my head, mylens, my framing or anything else for that matter (considering I amNOT coming from the 35mm world)..

Please correct me if I am wrong..

Thanks to all (again),.

Steve.

Tossing out all that's been said about crop and full frame, I see slightly less in my viewfinder than what I get captured to digital image. You may see this too, I don't think it has to do with the sensor and lens. The viewfinder image is a seperate path through the camera body. If your camera does this just recognize that when you frame a shot you will get just a bit more than what you see on all sides....Dennis..

Comment #13

Dennis,.

Same with me. While trying to avoid distarctions in viewfinder I was ending with them still in the image at very edge of image(file). Now, I know that to avoid it, I need to look into viewfinder from slight angle to make sure distracting element is not visible.http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #14

A 300mm lens on a sensor with a 1.5 crop will give the same field of view as a 400mm lens on a full frame sensor. In that sense, a 1.5 crop sensor does indeed make a lens "more powerful" in the telephoto range..

And that may be all the OP needs to know to start with, let's not bang on about pixel density etc..

There is one qualification to the above that IMHO are more relevant than pixel density at this stage:.

The depth of field and perspective created by the lens does not change when you put it on a different camera (sensor)..

These are physical, optical qualities of the lens..

In the example I have given above, the image from the 300mm lens will look different from the 400mm lens, even if the subject is framed in the same way. This is because longer lenses create more foreshortening (the main subject looks closer to objects in the background) and because depth of field is a function of the focal length of the lens and this does not change when the image is cropped by using a smaller sensor..

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Comment #15

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

That, what I see through the viewfinder of my Canon 40D is what willshow up after I download and look at it on a monitor (or printwithout doing any cropping)..

That, there is actually no need for any compensation in my head, mylens, my framing or anything else for that matter (considering I amNOT coming from the 35mm world)..

You are correct - but to be pedantic - even if you are coming from the 35mm world there is no need for compensation. The only issue for experienced 35mm users is that they may need to learn a new paradigm for lens selection before they start looking through the viewfinder. Where once you may have pulled out the 75 or 80mm lens for a given situation, now you pull out the 50mm. And so on..

And on the viewfinder, as discussed below - again, there's no difference from film here, either. Most 35mm film cameras (and full frame DSLRs) will show less than the full image in the viewfinder. Some people try to compensate for this, some people just accept it and crop afterwards if necessary..

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Comment #16

Arrowman wrote:.

A 300mm lens on a sensor with a 1.5 crop will give the same field ofview as a 400mm lens on a full frame sensor..

Can you provide some math to support this? Or was the 400mm a typo? Thanks......Dennis..

Comment #17

BAK wrote:.

SINCE YOU ARE NEW... you have no reason in the world to use 35mmequivalents....ALL YOU NEED TO DO is learn what focal length lenses on your newcamera get however much subject, from however much distance..

True when using your own equipment - just use it..

Not true when comparing with other systems. And the most likely time for doing that is while choosing equipment, perhaps as a beginner to DSLRs. "I've tried a 40D with a 17-85 mm lens. What lens would I need to do the same job on an Olympus DSLR?" or "My Panasonic FZ-whatnot has a 28-500 lens, what do I need to buy to get the same zoom on my new D40?" And so on and so forth..

Once you have the equipment you can pretty much forget about focal length equivalents - until the day someone asks you for the same advice... ..

Comment #18

Arrowman wrote:.

A 300mm lens on a sensor with a 1.5 crop will give the same field ofview as a 400mm lens on a full frame sensor. In that sense, a 1.5crop sensor does indeed make a lens "more powerful" in the telephotorange..

And that may be all the OP needs to know to start with, let's notbang on about pixel density etc..

300 x 1.5 = 450 but let's assume that is just a typo. The main thing is that you are right (IMHO) to say that the smaller sensor gives more 'reach'. However I would always seek to qualify that by saying that it gives more reach but at the cost of lower quality, compared to the longer lens on a full frame camera. I agree with keeping it simple but I don't think that's a difficult thing to take on board, even for a beginner..

But keeping things simple is one thing; incorrect advice is another....

There is one qualification to the above that IMHO are more relevantthan pixel density at this stage:.

The depth of field and perspective created by the lens does notchange when you put it on a different camera (sensor)..

These are physical, optical qualities of the lens..

Depth of field *does* change with sensor size. It may not be very important to the OP right now, but we still shouldn't give out false advice..

And perspective is *not* a physical, optical quality of the lens. It is a consequence of the subject distance..

In the example I have given above, the image from the 300mm lens willlook different from the 400mm lens, even if the subject is framed inthe same way. This is because longer lenses create moreforeshortening (the main subject looks closer to objects in thebackground) and because depth of field is a function of the focallength of the lens and this does not change when the image is croppedby using a smaller sensor..

Also wrong. A 300 mm lens on a 1.5x crop DSLR and a 450 mm (correcting for the typo) lens on a full frame camera, used to take the same shot (i.e. same composition from the same viewpoint) give *exactly the same* foreshortening...

Comment #19

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

300 x 1.5 = 450 but let's assume that is just a typo..

Yes, typo..

...it gives more reach but at the cost of lower quality, comparedto the longer lens on a full frame camera. I agree with keeping itsimple but I don't think that's a difficult thing to take on board,even for a beginner..

No it's not difficult, I agree. Just taking it one step at a time and trying to separate out the subjects..

Depth of field *does* change with sensor size. It may not be veryimportant to the OP right now, but we still shouldn't give out falseadvice..

Either I'm wrong (which I am prepared to accept) or there is a misunderstanding..

Is it not true that the DOF is a function of the lens and not of the sensor size? And therefore.

1. If we take a photo with a full frame camera and a 450mm lens, the DOF will be different from a photo taken with a 1.5 crop sensor and a 300mm lens?.

2. Or alternatively, that if we take a photo with a 450mm lens on a full frame camera, and another (and closer, to achieve the same framing) photo with a 300mm lens on the same camera, the DOF will be different because of the different lenses?.

And perspective is *not* a physical, optical quality of the lens. Itis a consequence of the subject distance..

Sorry, I misused the term. Scratch that part of my post..

...Also wrong. A 300 mm lens on a 1.5x crop DSLR and a 450 mm(correcting for the typo) lens on a full frame camera, used to takethe same shot (i.e. same composition from the same viewpoint) give*exactly the same* foreshortening..

Thank you for that correction of my misunderstanding. I should have quit while I was ahead..

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Comment #20

Arrowman wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

300 x 1.5 = 450 but let's assume that is just a typo..

Yes, typo..

...it gives more reach but at the cost of lower quality, comparedto the longer lens on a full frame camera. I agree with keeping itsimple but I don't think that's a difficult thing to take on board,even for a beginner..

No it's not difficult, I agree. Just taking it one step at a timeand trying to separate out the subjects..

- which is a good approach, I would agree. But "dumbing down" information, to use a more emotive but appropriate term, is not always easy to do without misrepresenting the very thing you are trying to simplify..

Depth of field *does* change with sensor size. It may not be veryimportant to the OP right now, but we still shouldn't give out falseadvice..

Either I'm wrong (which I am prepared to accept) or there is amisunderstanding..

Is it not true that the DOF is a function of the lens and not of thesensor size? And therefore.

No, it's not true. The part of the process that you have left out is that if you make a same-size enlargement from a smaller sensor and a larger one (e.g. you view both on a 12x8 print for example), you enlarge the small-sensor original - and therefore it's blur - by a larger amount..

This is why depth of field calculators such as http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html need to know the sensor size..

1. If we take a photo with a full frame camera and a 450mm lens, theDOF will be different from a photo taken with a 1.5 crop sensor and a300mm lens?.

Different, yes..

2. Or alternatively, that if we take a photo with a 450mm lens on afull frame camera, and another (and closer, to achieve the sameframing) photo with a 300mm lens on the same camera, the DOF will bedifferent because of the different lenses?.

Different, but differently different! I'm a bit short of time now, have to go out, but I'll write a bit more about that later - unless somebody else would like to do that? (be my guest!)..

I should havequit while I was ahead..

LOL!..

Comment #21

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Depth of field *does* change with sensor size. It may not be veryimportant to the OP right now, but we still shouldn't give out falseadvice..

And Arrowman said:.

Either I'm wrong (which I am prepared to accept) or there is amisunderstanding..

Is it not true that the DOF is a function of the lens and not of thesensor size?.

And then Steve said:.

No, it's not true. The part of the process that you have left out isthat if you make a same-size enlargement from a smaller sensor and alarger one (e.g. you view both on a 12x8 print for example), youenlarge the small-sensor original - and therefore it's blur - by alarger amount..

This is why depth of field calculators such ashttp://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html need to know the sensor size..

1. If we take a photo with a full frame camera and a 450mm lens, theDOF will be different from a photo taken with a 1.5 crop sensor and a300mm lens?.

Different, yes..

2. Or alternatively, that if we take a photo with a 450mm lens on afull frame camera, and another (and closer, to achieve the sameframing) photo with a 300mm lens on the same camera, the DOF will bedifferent because of the different lenses?.

Different, but differently different! I'm a bit short of time now,have to go out, but I'll write a bit more about that later - unlesssomebody else would like to do that? (be my guest!)..

I don't think I'm disagreeing with what you have written above. But I've done a little more reading, and thinking, since this post and I'd like to try and clarify. As much for my own benefit as that of the OP .

My primary reference is here:http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/.../tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htmand in particular this bit:.

As sensor size increases, the depth of field will decrease for a given aperture (when > filling the frame with a subject of the same size and distance). This is because.

Larger sensors require one to get closer to their subject, or to use a longer focal.

Length in order to fill the frame with that subject. This means that one has to use.

Progressively smaller aperture sizes in order to maintain the same depth of field on > larger sensors. The following calculator predicts the required aperture and focal.

Length in order to achieve the same depth of field (while maintaining perspective)..

This passage (along with a re-read of your post, above), I think, highlights the difference between the way we are expressing things. May I suggest that:.

1. You are right to say that DOF varies with sensor size, IF we assume that the objective is to fill the frame with the subject of the same size and distance, because you need to use a different focal length lens (on the different sized sensor) - and DOF varies with focal length. Therefore there is a reasonable perception that DOF varies with sensor size..

But.

2. It is still true that - technically, anyway - DOF is a function only of focal length. As soon as you start compensating for sensor size by changing focal length, you are - well, changing the focal length..

But of course.

3. For practical purposes, it is valid to say that there is a relationship between DOF and sensor size, because most of the time people will be considering similar subject and framing as the objective. They have no real interest in comparing depth of field between two photos that are completely differently framed. But it remains the fact that - at a technical level - DOF is a function only of focal length..

I know that is probably exactly what you meant to say, but Id like to confirm my understanding..

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Comment #22

Sorry, I've not had time to come back on this. I want to write a proper summary of depth of field comparisons but I've been otherwise occupied and unfortunately I'm now tied up with work again. I'll try to do something this evening.....

Comment #23

Arrowman wrote:.

My primary reference is here:http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/.../tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htmand in particular this bit:.

Sean McHugh's tutorials are very good, but I prefer to approach it a different way, which I'll do below..

[snip].

May I suggest that:.

1. You are right to say that DOF varies with sensor size, IF weassume that the objective is to fill the frame with the subject ofthe same size and distance, because you need to use a different focallength lens (on the different sized sensor) - and DOF varies withfocal length. Therefore there is a reasonable perception that DOFvaries with sensor size..

Yes but it is not only because of the focal length change - sensor size also affects DoF..

But.

2. It is still true that - technically, anyway - DOF is a functiononly of focal length. As soon as you start compensating for sensorsize by changing focal length, you are - well, changing the focallength..

But of course.

3. For practical purposes, it is valid to say that there is arelationship between DOF and sensor size, because most of the timepeople will be considering similar subject and framing as theobjective. They have no real interest in comparing depth of fieldbetween two photos that are completely differently framed. But itremains the fact that - at a technical level - DOF is a function onlyof focal length..

I know that is probably exactly what you meant to say, but Id liketo confirm my understanding..

No, it isn't. Depth of field is not *only* a function of focal length. It is also a function of sensor size - and *not* as you assert in all three paragraphs above, merely because you are changing the focal length..

There are several valid and useful ways to compare depth of field:.

1) 'Same composition' on cameras with different sensor sizes. To achieve the same composition you must maintain the perspective which means you must maintain the same subject distance. Therefore you must change the focal length in proportion to the sensor size. For example:.

Subject distance 5 metres, and f/2.8 in each case.Full frame 35mm; 80 mm lens. DoF = 0.66 m.1.6x crop; 50 mm lens. DoF = 1.08 m.Compact with 1/2.5" (approx. 6x crop) sensor; 13.2 mm lens. DoF = 4.84 m..

So - smaller sensor, same composition -> greater depth of field..

2) Same camera, same subject distance, different focal length. This is simply zooming in/out..

Subject distance 5 metres, f/2.8 - i.e. same as above.Full frame 35 mm; 80 mm lens. DoF = 0.66 m - i.e. same as above.Full frame 35 mm; 50 mm lens. DoF = 1.73 m - notice this is *not* as above..

So - shorter focal length, all else equal -> greater depth of field..

3) Same lens on cameras with different sensor sizes..

Subject distance 5 metres, f/2.8 - i.e. same as above.Full frame 35 mm; 50 mm lens. DoF = 1.73 m - i.e. same as above.1.6x crop; 50 mm lens. DoF = 1.08 m. - i.e.



So - smaller sensor, same focal length -> less depth of field - contrast with (1).Some people find this result surprising..

4) Same camera, different lenses; same framing achieved by moving to/from subject. This is 'same magnification'. Note that this is the only example where the perspective changes..

Subject distance 5 metres, f/2.8 - i.e. same as above.Full frame 35 mm; 80 mm lens. DoF = 0.66 m - i.e. same as (1).Subject distance changed to 5x(50/80) = 3.125 metres.Full frame 35 mm; 50 mm lens. DoF = 0.66 m..

So - same sensor size, same magnification -> same depth of field..

You could no doubt contrive other comparisons, but those are the useful ones, changing as little as possible in each case to isolate the factor responsible for the depth of field..

(All calculations courtesy of http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html)..

Comment #24

..I'll have a closer read when time permits..

Clearly I agree with your points 1) and 2) - and 4) too, I think. 3) is the one where we differ / I need to understand and I will study this further..

Thanks for the info, and the very good explanation..

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Comment #25

OP, other posters have adequately, indeed if not in excruciating detail, described the difference between crop and FF..

I would add that the differences are less important today than they were a few years ago. When crop-sensor DLSR cameras were introduced, and even extending into when the first one became affordable (the Canon Digital Rebel), there was a sad dearth of lenses designed for the crop-sensor..

For telephoto users, this wasn't as big of a deal. But wide angle users really suffered as you had to buy very expensive ultra-wide lenses just to get moderate wide angle. And in both cases, the lenses were bigger and heavier than they needed to be for a crop sensor camera..

But over the past 2-3 years or so, we've seen numerous lenses designed for crop sensor DLSRs that are lighter, smaller, and cheaper than their FF brethren. Not only do Canon and Nikon make them for their crop sensor cameras, but Tamron and Sigma have made numerous lenses as well..

While it's true that the best glass (Canon L lenses, for example) are still designed for FF bodies, the crop sensor lenses ain't bad. And you can save a bundle buying a crop camera and the specifically designed lenses for them and still get excellent results..

Dpreview & pbase supporterhttp://www.pbase.com/digirob..

Comment #26

One key difference between crop and FF is that the least expensive FF body is the Canon 5D at $3000 with the typical lens. That's probably all the OP needs to know...

Comment #27

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

Hi all,Real newbie here...I keep reading people talk about a crop sensor camera as opposed to afull frame camera in regards to lenses..

SLR lenses were originally develped for 35mm film slr cameras. The size of image inside a flm slr is the same as the piece of film..

Digital slr cameras originally were made with sensors that were smaller than the piece of 35mm film. Thus they collected a less wide and less tall image than the 35mm piece of film could collect, from the same lenses..

This has an effect on how lenses appear to work. For example a 50mm lens on a film slr camera was described as a normal lens, i.e. one that showed about as much as the human eye saw. On a digital slr with a smaller sensor an image less wide and less high was produced thus the 50mm appeared to become slightly more of a telephoto than it was on a film 35mm slr camera..

If you have experience with 35mm film slr cameras you will find that all your lenses appear to be a bit more telephoto when used on a digital crop sensor slr than you recall them being on your film camera..

There are some DX lenses available now, these are optimised for the crop sensor in a digital slr, a downside of these is that you could not use them on a film 35mm slr or on a full frame digital slr because the image they project into the camera is too small for full frame..

Hope that is clear..

Mark_A..

Comment #28

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