snubbr.com

viewfinders - p&s vs DSLR
I currently own a Canon S3 and am looking at getting my first DSLR. One thing I've noticed is that on DSLR's you don't see the final picture until after the picture is snapped. This is a change for me as on my S3 I'm use to pressing the shutter button half way down and getting a view that is after the camera has may adjustments. This seems like a steep learning curve for new DSLR users; having to "visualize" how our camera settings effect the final picture. Am I making this sound worse then it is?..

Comments (6)

The learning curve is going to be a lot steeper than just that. It's probably every bit as bad as you make it out to be... until you start to learn: About exposure, depth of field, your equipment, about what to expect in what conditions, etc. If you want to control the full photographic experience a DSLR is the way to go. If you want the camera to do all the work, better off sticking with a point and shoot..

Ozarkham wrote:.

I currently own a Canon S3 and am looking at getting my first DSLR.One thing I've noticed is that on DSLR's you don't see the finalpicture until after the picture is snapped. This is a change for meas on my S3 I'm use to pressing the shutter button half way down andgetting a view that is after the camera has may adjustments. Thisseems like a steep learning curve for new DSLR users; having to"visualize" how our camera settings effect the final picture. Am Imaking this sound worse then it is?.

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #1

Ozarkham wrote:.

One thing I've noticed is that on DSLR's you don't see the finalpicture until after the picture is snapped..

Only if you mean image that the camera has processed, like added saturation or contrast or some color filter you apply. Never a problem for me, since I like the natural color the best, the only difference from the picture I snapped and the view I look through the viewfinder is the brightness..

This is a change for me as on my S3 I'm use to pressing the shutter button halfway down and getting a view that is after the camera has may adjustments..

Never used and S3, but then all camera autofocuses when you do that, and the only "preview" you have is the Depth of Field preview..

This seems like a steep learning curve for new DSLR users; having to"visualize" how our camera settings effect the final picture..

No. Modern entry level DSLR come with automatic mode. They are so much better than compact cameras that even if you do not know much about the settings they usually get it right for you..

Am I making this sound worse then it is?.

In my humble opinion, yes. Before you know it, you'll get used to it. Even if you have to "visualized" the outcome, it will only take a split of a second and you won't even notice it..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Tasik Biru - 'Blue Lake'..

Comment #2

...you can not see it through the viewfinder - you have to look at the LCD screen..

Most of entry level DSLRs (except Olympus) do not have live-preview or 'liveview' as it is commonly referred to. So, if you end up with a live-preview DSLR, you will probably alternate between the EVF and the LCD until you gain confidence with the camera..

The main advantage is where you must point the camera at an angle or close to the ground where it may be difficult to position your head near the viewfinder such as with macro-photography..

Here's the catch though - the live-preview feature, for me, is most useful in strong lighting (contrast) conditions where you want to balance highlights with your subject without losing detail in either but, if the light is too strong to see the LCD screen then where's the advantage?.

You will probably end up using the EVF and either adding some exposure compensation - which experience will teach you how much and in what situations - or exposure bracketing in a burst mode taking multiple exposures..

Cheers..

Comment #3

I've just made the jump from a canon G6 to a canon 400d, and whilst I was bit scared of the veiwfinder vs lcd issue to start with, in fact it's no problem. I'm also finding that even on auto I'm gettting better results, So don't worry that you have mountains to learn before you get nice results, get used to the camera then you can start that mountain climb!!..

Comment #4

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

The learning curve is going to be a lot steeper than just that. It'sprobably every bit as bad as you make it out to be... until you startto learn: About exposure, depth of field, your equipment, about whatto expect in what conditions, etc. If you want to control the fullphotographic experience a DSLR is the way to go. If you want thecamera to do all the work, better off sticking with a point and shoot..

Ozarkham wrote:.

I currently own a Canon S3 and am looking at getting my first DSLR.One thing I've noticed is that on DSLR's you don't see the finalpicture until after the picture is snapped. This is a change for meas on my S3 I'm use to pressing the shutter button half way down andgetting a view that is after the camera has may adjustments. Thisseems like a steep learning curve for new DSLR users; having to"visualize" how our camera settings effect the final picture. Am Imaking this sound worse then it is?.

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word..

And what full control of the photagraphic experience do you not get with high end p and s cameas that you do on a DSLR?- white balane adjust?- aperture and shutter speed adjust?- ISO adjust?- noise reduction sensativity adjust?- flash output adjust?- light metre histogram?- exposure + - adjust?- Choice of auto focus areas- manual focus?- chice of exposre area metering atreas?pluss all the ones ive forgotten..

Comment #5

And what full control of the photagraphic experience do you not getwith high end p and s cameas that you do on a DSLR?- white balane adjust?- aperture and shutter speed adjust?- ISO adjust?- noise reduction sensativity adjust?- flash output adjust?- light metre histogram?- exposure + - adjust?- Choice of auto focus areas- manual focus?- chice of exposre area metering atreas?pluss all the ones ive forgotten.

I don't know if this was sarcastic or you were sincerely asking. Anyways, actually you get a bunch of those on high-end P&S. My A620 from 2006 had white balance + custom WB, all creative modes, ISO adjustment, don't know about noise (I did that in computer with better tools), flash output adjustment as FEP (and even limited manual power settings), histograms with individual RGB channels, exposure compensation, custom auto-focus area by using Flexizone instead of AiAF, manual focus, metering options (Evaluative, CWA, Spot), and some other stuff too. There's actually an add-on that can add even MORE features, like a battery meter..

DSLRs are just better at these basics, so less noise at high-isos, more focus points, faster to operate, etc, but you also have options like more aperture control (only limited by lens), RAW, external flash and strobe support, actual image for preview through viewfinder, faster frame rate, size (can be a plus since you need something to counteract lens weight), and upgradability - with a P&S you're stuck with focal length range, aperture control, and IQ because the lens can't be removed, but with a DSLR, you could buy an entry level and equip it with a pro lens for great IQ or have a whole bunch of lenses for specialized purposes (landscapes, wildlife, portrait, etc)...

Comment #6

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.