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UV Filter
Just bought the 55-200 and the guy asks me if I want a UV filter. I'm like no I don't guess then he goes to get my lens and there are not left, except for the display so I'm like sure if ya throw in that UV filter and he said how about buy one get on free on the UV filter so I said sure thinking I could use one of them on my 18-55. So I know from reading the packing that it helps block UV outdoors, but can I shoot with it indoors? I don't want to have to take this thing off every time I come from outdoors in. He kidda pushed it off as a lens protector more than a UV filter which is fine by me if it works indoors as well...

Comments (8)

Squawk wrote:.

Just bought the 55-200 and the guy asks me if I want a UV filter. I'mlike no I don't guess then he goes to get my lens and there are notleft, except for the display so I'm like sure if ya throw in that UVfilter and he said how about buy one get on free on the UV filter soI said sure thinking I could use one of them on my 18-55. So I knowfrom reading the packing that it helps block UV outdoors, but can Ishoot with it indoors? I don't want to have to take this thing offevery time I come from outdoors in. He kidda pushed it off as a lensprotector more than a UV filter which is fine by me if it worksindoors as well..

Just a salesman being a salesman..

Sensors on DSLR cameras are not sensitive to UV in the way film was so it will have zero effect on changing the appearance of a pic taken outdoors, except possibly a negative one: a cheap filter can degrade the image by causing more flare in some situations. If you want to use it as a protector you can leave it on indoors as well as outdoors..

For simple protection of the front lens element, a lens hood works fine. I'd stick a clear filter on the front for protection if shooting in wet / dusty situations but not otherwise..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #1

UV filters are not much use on a DSLR. Sensors are not as sensitive to UV as film..

Some people use them mostly for lens protection, some people ( like me ) prefer to use the hood because we argue a UV filter may cause a color cast. Neither side can agree..

Unless you shoot at altitude where UV is stronger I'd suggest saving the money..

The shop are trying to maneuver you into buying what they want to sell. That alone would make me walk away..

StephenG.

Fuji S3 ProPentax K100DFuji S9600Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #2

Squawk wrote:.

Just bought the 55-200 and the guy asks me if I want a UV filter. I'mlike no I don't guess then he goes to get my lens and there are notleft, except for the display so I'm like sure if ya throw in that UVfilter and he said how about buy one get on free on the UV filter soI said sure thinking I could use one of them on my 18-55. So I knowfrom reading the packing that it helps block UV outdoors, but can Ishoot with it indoors? I don't want to have to take this thing offevery time I come from outdoors in. He kidda pushed it off as a lensprotector more than a UV filter which is fine by me if it worksindoors as well..

Well, the thing about UV filters is that they don't have a function on DSLRs except to "protect" the front element of the lens. However, you need to spend money to get a good multicoated UV filter (probably 50-60% the cost of the 55-200 lens), otherwise you will have a filter that will degrade the image quality and be extremely susceptible to flare..

Personally, I would not use them, especially a lower grade one. It is also debatable how much "protection" they give, since they are fairly thin pieces of glass. You will see people showing pictures where their lens fell, and the UV filter "saved the lens" by absorbing the impact and was smashed while the lens was fine. To me, this does not prove anything, since the front element on most lenses are pretty thick while the UV filter is pretty fragile comparatively..

However, if you are OK with image quality the UV filter gives you outdoors, it should not make much of a difference indoors...

Comment #3

It's okay to use a UV filter for lens mounted on a digital body, but a clear protector would have been sufficient as the camera's sensor already blocks UV..

There are tons of posts arguing the pros and cons of lens filters. Many contend that unless the filters are of the highest quality, they degrade images (I agree) and should otherwise not be used. Others believe filters are necessary lens protection. Provided the filters you received are high-quality, thin-frame and multi-coated (unlikely considering the buy one/get one), you'll be fine..

Shooting indoors, again provided the filter is high-quality and multi-coated, should be fine unless there are light sources that could induce reflections...

Comment #4

I'm using B&W MCR filters on my lenses and I have yet to see any negative side effects. Protects my sensitive glass very well...

Comment #5

I've always used a UV filter as added protection for the lens - rather glad that I do as I fell over yesterday whilst shooting in London (looking upwards at the buildings for possible shots instead of looking where I was walking), anyway, lens cap took most of the impact but it chipped the UV filter in the process. I'm glad it was a 40 filter rather than a 250 lens that was damaged! You pay your money and make your choice..

Confused of Malvern'The greatest fool can ask more than the wisest man can answer'..

Comment #6

Thank you all for the advise turns out the one that he gave me doesn't even fit my lens so I'll be taking it back tomorrow and having him give me a fifty dolar protection lens cover instead of the buy one get one free UV filter. And wow did he rip me looked up on their web page and it's only 9 bucks not 20...

Comment #7

A good quality UV filter will protect your lens from dirt, water spots scratches ect..

I doubt if a $9 UV filter will be very good though. You dont need a $100 plus filter either. You can get a good one for $30 - $40. I have been using Hoya UV filters for close to 50 years and find them to be very good. Some people claim you lose IQ with a filter but I have never noticed a difference with or without the filter.Milt..

Comment #8

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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