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UV Filter for, well, UV?
I've read about the debate over using a UV filter for lens protection vs a lens hood. I've also read about the IQ issue (or lack of) when using a UV filter. So my question is: are DSLR's benefitted by an UV filter when UV is present?.

I live at 5000ft, so there is presumable quite a bit of UV around me. Will a UV filter help my DSLR take "cleaner" pictures? Is there a filter on the sensor that takes care of this (I've heard there is a lowpass filter somewhere in there)?..

Comments (8)

The sensors in DSLRs are not sensitive to UV light: so, there is no benefit at all to be gained from using a UV filter from that point of view. The UV filter dates from film days when some camera films were sensitive to UV light which could would therefore cause over-exposure..

As you will have seen the issue of whether or not to use clear filters as lens protectors comes up a lot. I prefer to use the lens hood to protect the front element from chance knocks... but if I had a 1000 lens and wanted to take pictures in dusty conditions, for example, I would probably think differently. The advice always is that if you do decide to use a filter, get a good one..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #1

Thanks for the response. I have a couple of Hoya S-HMC UV filters, and was trying to decide if I needed one for another lens. As long as UV won't cause any harm to the internals of the camera, I guess I'll just stick with a hood for this lens...

Comment #2

I live over 5000' too and sometimes go up to 14,000. I find the higher I go the better quality of light. At 14,000 feet I can get polarizer blue skies without a polarizer. The visual difference is even dramatic from sea level to 5000 feet..

Vmax911 wrote:.

Thanks for the response. I have a couple of Hoya S-HMC UV filters,and was trying to decide if I needed one for another lens. As long asUV won't cause any harm to the internals of the camera, I guess I'lljust stick with a hood for this lens..

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #3

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

I live over 5000' too and sometimes go up to 14,000. I find thehigher I go the better quality of light. At 14,000 feet I can getpolarizer blue skies without a polarizer. The visual difference iseven dramatic from sea level to 5000 feet..

So, as a fellow high-altituder, do you use UV filters on your lenses?..

Comment #4

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

I live over 5000' too and sometimes go up to 14,000. I find thehigher I go the better quality of light. At 14,000 feet I can getpolarizer blue skies without a polarizer. The visual difference iseven dramatic from sea level to 5000 feet..

Vmax911 wrote:.

Thanks for the response. I have a couple of Hoya S-HMC UV filters,and was trying to decide if I needed one for another lens. As long asUV won't cause any harm to the internals of the camera, I guess I'lljust stick with a hood for this lens..

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word..

Living at 7ft above sea level and then visiting the Grand Canyon which is ~5000ft above sea level, the pictures just looked different, I couldn't put my finger on it until now..

The sky is so much better looking then here.Lenses I'm waiting for:AF-S 80-400mm f/4-5.6G VRIIAF-S 27-300mm f/3.5-5.6G VRIIAF-S 16-135mm f/3.5-4.5G VRIIAF-S 12-36mm f/4G.

We Can All Wish Can't We?.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

Vmax911 wrote:.

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

I live over 5000' too and sometimes go up to 14,000. I find thehigher I go the better quality of light. At 14,000 feet I can getpolarizer blue skies without a polarizer. The visual difference iseven dramatic from sea level to 5000 feet..

So, as a fellow high-altituder, do you use UV filters on your lenses?.

Absolutely not. The only filters I use are polarizer, graduated neutral density, and neutral density (usually only for waterfalls), and I only use them when needed...

Comment #6

What's the difference?.

Absolutely not. The only filters I use are polarizer, graduatedneutral density, and neutral density (usually only for waterfalls),and I only use them when needed..

Jeremy..

Comment #7

Non-graduated filters are have a constant light reducing effect over the whole filter. The specific use referred to here is to reduce the total available light to enable a very slow shutter speed to be used when photographing a waterfall..

Graduated filters have are darkest at the top and lightest at the bottom. They are typically used to reduce the dynamic range of a scene by darkening the sky.Chris R..

Comment #8

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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