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Tripod vs. Shutter speed + kit question
I've already decided on a camera, lens etc.... and am looking at a couple kits to purchase with the camera (looking to purchase from Willoughbys). Between the advanced and deluxe kit (I know I'm a bit beyond myself here but I'm trying to keep costs down for the near future), there's a difference between a 2GB and 4GB card, tripod vs. no tripod, and a pack of filters, screen protector and a spare battery. The spare battery I know will come in handy (I ALWAYS carry spare batteries for my compact when I go out) but the rest, I'm not quite sure about. So to keep things simple :.

1) Will UV, flourescent and polarizer filters come in handy on a first DSLR?.

2) The tripod - since the kit with the battery doesn't inclue a tripod, is there a way I can around the absence of a tripod using a higher shutter speed in low light or action shots?.

3) 2GB vs. 4GB. Does this mean that I can shoot higher quality shots (larger for prints) or is there really a difference here that would push me to get the 4GB? (my budget ends at $1,700).

Sorry for the long post, but none of the reviews I've seen addressed the shutter speed issue and I want to make sure I'm not spending extra money on stuff I won't need (I would like to shoot some waterscapes). Thanks!..

Comments (6)

Grzesc wrote:.

I've already decided on a camera, lens etc.... and am looking at acouple kits to purchase with the camera (looking to purchase fromWilloughbys). Between the advanced and deluxe kit (I know I'm a bitbeyond myself here but I'm trying to keep costs down for the nearfuture), there's a difference between a 2GB and 4GB card, tripod vs.no tripod, and a pack of filters, screen protector and a sparebattery. The spare battery I know will come in handy (I ALWAYS carryspare batteries for my compact when I go out) but the rest, I'm notquite sure about. So to keep things simple :.

1) Will UV, flourescent and polarizer filters come in handy on afirst DSLR?.

UV and CP - yes, fluorescent no. UV for protection (your choice) and CP is very useful for outdoors. You can read up on when/why to use each. I don't see how a fluorescent filter will benefit you any more than a UV filter..

2) The tripod - since the kit with the battery doesn't inclue atripod, is there a way I can around the absence of a tripod using ahigher shutter speed in low light or action shots?.

You won't need a tripod for any action shots, unless you're camera/lense combo costs more than $4,000 (because of weight). For action shots, you're shutter speeds should be high - which negates the need for a tripod..

3) 2GB vs. 4GB. Does this mean that I can shoot higher quality shots(larger for prints) or is there really a difference here that wouldpush me to get the 4GB? (my budget ends at $1,700).

A 4GB card will hold twice as many photos as a 2GB card..

Sorry for the long post, but none of the reviews I've seen addressedthe shutter speed issue and I want to make sure I'm not spendingextra money on stuff I won't need (I would like to shoot somewaterscapes). Thanks!.

In all honesty, you'll actually save money if you don't buy the kit with the camera. The kit is where the company makes their money - they bundle inexpensive products and sell them for more than they are worth. You can just as easily go out and buy separate filters, a tripod, and a media card including shipping, for less than your kit will cost. (likely).

Post what camera and lense you have and I'll recommend a UV and CP filter as well as a media card..

Tim'Be the change you wish to see in the world.' -Mahatma Gandhihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/timskis6/..

Comment #1

I've already decided on a camera, lens etc.... and am looking at acouple kits to purchase with the camera (looking to purchase fromWilloughbys). Between the advanced and deluxe kit (I know I'm a bitbeyond myself here but I'm trying to keep costs down for the nearfuture), there's a difference between a 2GB and 4GB card, tripod vs.no tripod, and a pack of filters, screen protector and a sparebattery. The spare battery I know will come in handy (I ALWAYS carryspare batteries for my compact when I go out) but the rest, I'm notquite sure about. So to keep things simple :.

1) Will UV, flourescent and polarizer filters come in handy on afirst DSLR?2) The tripod - since the kit with the battery doesn't inclue atripod, is there a way I can around the absence of a tripod using ahigher shutter speed in low light or action shots?3) 2GB vs. 4GB. Does this mean that I can shoot higher quality shots(larger for prints) or is there really a difference here that wouldpush me to get the 4GB? (my budget ends at $1,700).

Sorry for the long post, but none of the reviews I've seen addressedthe shutter speed issue and I want to make sure I'm not spendingextra money on stuff I won't need (I would like to shoot somewaterscapes). Thanks!.

I'll second the previous poster's comment. Shops often will have a low headline price for the common cameras, but then charge too much for mundane accessories to make up for it. So just get what you know you need..

A circular polarizer is great for landscapes on sunny days, giving rich blue skies and saturated colours - easy to over do it but a nice look once in a while. It also doubles as a two-stop neutral density filter if you simply want to cut out some light (e.g. to allow use of a slow shutter speed to give a nice blur to the surface of flowing water, for example)..

Fluorescent filter - no. UV filter - pointless, except possibly to protect the lens (DSLR sensors aren't sensitive to UV light in the way film is, so there is no need to cut out the UV). If you really want to protect the front of the lens from occasional knocks, a lens hood is just as good and won't degrade the image like cheap filters can. (You can be sure that the UV filter in a bundle will not be the highest quality one in the store)..

[small tip: if you have more than one lens and want a filter, get the one that fits the biggest-diameter lens, then use a simple step-down adapter ring to fit it to the smaller lens. That way one filter can be used on all your lenses.].

Similarly, don't go for the cheap tripod that will be thrown in with a bundle. If you decide you don't want a tripod you've wasted the money; if you do decide you one, pay more and get a good one. Of course for action shots you will use as fast a shutter speed as possible and a tripod may well not be necessary. For other styles of photgraphy (e.g. landscapes in low light) it would be essential. Wait until you know what you need..

A 4GB card won't let you shoot higher resolution shots than a 2GB card; it will just hold more. There is absolutely no reason to shoot at anything other than the highest resolution, unless your card is nearly full and you don't have a spare. I have a 2GB card in my 6MP camera and it allows me over 600 JPEGs at the highest quality setting. Conversely, if you have a 10MP camera and shoot RAW, the files will be about 16MB each and you would get about 130 on a 2GB card, which may be too few. Cards are cheap. I'd rather have two 2GB cards than one 4GB one - occasionaly they can fail and that way you will lose fewer shots..

Screen protectors - pointless gimmicks which just make it harder to see the back LCD screen..

So... in the first instance get the camera / lens, memory card(s), spare battery, possibly a CP filter, and leave it at that. (Except - get a small bag / backpack to both protect it and to keep it out of sight when you are not using it)..

I hope that helpsbest wishesMike..

Comment #2

Thanks for the tips! I'm getting a Nikon D80 (preferably with a 18-135mm variable f stop or similar) and I do some shoots in the city (usually always take my cam with me), looking for shots with crisp lights/readable signs...

Comment #3

They seldom do more than pump up appearances and prices. Even quality stores sometimes take advantage of beginners by offering what seem to be reasonable kits..

Compare prices, including shipping and handling, against B&H in New York. A brick and mortar store may well not be able to match legitimate internet pricing but might be close. If the camera and maybe lens prices is good, watch for inflated accessory prices. B&H is not the only quality source, there are more but if the prices seem too much better, there is usually a problem ahead. "They" will get their money, sometimes in higher shipping fees, overpriced accessories or just they'll attempt to bait and switch. Not saying Willoughby's does this, just it's something to be wary of until you've established the reputation of the seller..

The card? Agree, 2 gigs is likely enough, local sources like CostCo are usually pretty competitive, NewEgg on the net as well if you decide you want more. A 4 gig card should be priced pretty much at 2x the 2 gig card (haven't looked to see where the sweet spot is recently) so you may find 4 gig a bit cheaper or a bit more expensive. The reliability is generally good with quality cards. I'm still using a couple of 2 gig cards and carry a few older 1 gig cards to use as needed. Starting today? I might get the 4 gig but wouldn't argue the wisdom of 2 cards either..

Tripods are a huge subject, short of arguing camera brands with religious fervor, few topics get brought as often as trying to find "the right tripod.".

There is probably no accessory which could add as much quality to your images as a good tripod. Even a bad tripod, before it breaks or is exposed to too much wind, can serve to steady a cameraa for some uses. Since increasing ISO and/or shutter speed can only take you so far, those aren't substitutes for use of a tripod. Some shots just need solid support and longer exposures and a tripod provides that..

I'd also agree that a "kit" tripod probably won't serve well or long. I'd suggest that you will likely want to spend at least $100 and generally more, closer to $150-$300 for a good, solid, capable tripod and head that will go a long way to meeting most people's needs for quite a while. Sub $70 tripods can well be "disposables....

Comment #4

Thanks, I'm going to check out more brick and mortar stores before purchasing online. So basically, buying the body alone and lens/accessories seperately is usually cheaper and a better idea than the kit?..

Comment #5

Grzesc wrote:.

Thanks, I'm going to check out more brick and mortar stores beforepurchasing online. So basically, buying the body alone andlens/accessories seperately is usually cheaper and a better idea thanthe kit?.

Body + lens kit, generally kits put together by the manufacturer, are often a good deal..

It's all the overpriced cheapo accessories (tripod, filters, spare batteries, etc) that the store "throws in" that are a bad deal..

Seen in a fortune cookie:Fear is the darkroom where negatives are developed..

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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