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I am thinking about getting the canon 400d. One of the things I would like to be able to do is auto bracketing for HDR photos. Is the 400D a good choice for that or are the some other cameras that are better that are sub 500? Thanks..

Comments (11)

Tey112 wrote:.

I am thinking about getting the canon 400d. One of the things I wouldlike to be able to do is auto bracketing for HDR photos. Is the 400Da good choice for that.

The 400D will take three exposure-bracketed shots with up to two stops between them (i.e. four stops total between the highest and lowest). If you shoot RAW you can add another stop at either end when you process the RAW files. That should be more than enough...

Comment #1

When shooting hdr you have to barcket via chnages in shutter speed only. unless you absoluitely know that your dslr is using shutter speeds to bracket the better solution is to switch to manual mode. in manual you can change the shutter speed to your heart's content. and make as many bracketed shots as you wish, you are not limited to whatever the autobracket gives you..

This brings up another point. obviously with a 3shot autobracket you have a limited amount of dynamic range that you are going to get. it is more than the single shot. BUT, what happens when it does not cover the dynamic range of the scene? are you the photgrapher going to be satisfied with getting a partial capture of the scene and the partial DR that goes with it? if you have a 15stop scene, but your 3shot autobracket captures 11, now what? this gives you a hdri, but it will not be the scene you took the shots of. if you want the scene in it's entirety then you have to find out what the DR of the subject is. and bracket for that amount of DR.

But it will be the scene..

The next reply is a how to I wrote a while back, it may be of interest...

Comment #2

HDR=High Dynamic Range photographyto do hdr-.

If you put camera into full auto matrix metering, take first shot note fstop and shutter speed. put camera into full manual, see if camera still has the matrix fstop and shutter speed. if yes, then using shutter speed go up 2-4 shutter speeds 1 fstop worth of shutter speed at a time. the back to matrix shutter speed and go down same number of shutter speeds..

Christian bloch in his hdri handbook did a test of 1 fstop bracketing vs 2fstop bracketing. there was an obvious image quality falloff using the 2fstop bracketing.this is on a tripod with cable release..

No, you should not use 1 raw shot and convert 1 stop up and down, because their is not enough dynamic range in the 1 raw shot. dynamic range is why we are doing this, hdr is trying to get all it can..

The group of shots can be raw or jpeg. if jpeg they can be used as is. if raw remember that you HAVE to batch process all 5-9(?) shots. this is because the pp has to be all the same on every pic. you cannot, for example make any attempt to get the shadow details of the group of raw pics, because that would require different amounts of pp, and you cannot do that with hdr. the pp for all shots has to be identical..

For me I just shoot them in jpeg and use them from the camera, that way they are all identical because the camera jpeg settings are the same for every shot. I also put my hand streched in front of the lens and take a check shot and when done take a ending shot with hand. this tells me where the hdr group is on my memory card when I transfer to the pc..

The only important item is to bracket using shutter speeds only. if fstops are used it changes dof between shots. and shoot enough shots, 5-9(?) is the optimum. the only other thought is to shoot a scene that deserves the the hdr technique, too many people are shooting hdr because it is new or different or whatever. many people are using hdr software on scenes that do not have enough dynamic range; they end up with images that have been enhanced by hdr software, they are not hdr images. the dynamic range was not in the scene to begin with.

This can be checked with a spotmeter on different areas. NOTE: use of auto bracketing on a camera may not work unless you know the bracketing is using the shutter speeds to bracket. in any event, you really need 5-9(?) shots for hdr; this is more than the auto bracket fcn on almost all cameras. and the bracketing has to be both sides of the middle shot. make you use enough brackets to cover the previously checked dynamic range.

And the scene should have no movement, if so the item will blur in the hdr image..

Do not adjust the focus. set the focus on infinity or use a hyperfocalsetup for focus..

Do not adjust the white balance for individual shots. go with awb or 1 setting and do not change it..

Remember, hdr was created and meant for scene that have a dynamic range that exceeds the dynamic range of the camera sensor, about 5-6stops. hdr with the required software allows the user to capture a scene that has very high dynamic range..

I currently use Dynamic-Photo HDR and recommend it. Less than the price of photomatrix and it has 6 different looks, (the photomatrix look is included, and each of the 6 looks can be fine tuned. Get Dynamic-Photo hdr here-http://www.mediachance.com/hdri/index.html also included is a program that is part of DP hdr that can make a fake hdr look image from a jpeg...

Comment #3

You'll find several (but not all) DSLRs will bracket three exposures, and even some P&S cameras will (my Canon G7, for example). With three exposures, you'd like to have exposure bracketing at 2-stop intervals (my G7 will do that too; so will my Nikon D70 and D80)..

What would be better is a camera that offers you 5 exposure (or more) auto-bracketing. The only cameras I know about that do that are the Nikon D200, D300, and D3 (and maybe some of the D3's predecessors). However: (1) All these cameras cost $1,200 and up (some way up). (2) All three offer 9-exposure autobracketing, all at only 1-stop (or less) intervals. That gives you the same exposure range as 5 shots at 2-stop intervals, but with more acreage used up on your memory card. (I guess on a D3, you'd be pushing 180 MB of images with 9 RAW exposures! A person could fill up a card real fast that way.).

In my experience, 3 shots is often, but not always, enough. I find my G7 excellent in many circumstances taking HDR exposures since it has two custom configuration options, where you can preset everything but ISO. So I set one of those custom configs to shutter priority, with 3 shots at 2-stop intervals and the LCD screen playback at off so's to get the three images as quickly as the camera is capable of (which isn't all that quickly). Simple..

I do it hand-held, too, if the light level is reasonable and if I use Photomatix for processing, which does a fine job of registering images. But if the light level gets too low, I need to resort to a tripod and maybe manual exposure. (Remember, you always want to vary the shutter speed, not the aperture, for exposure bracketing.) One thing that makes a DSLR superior for HDR is that even low levels of noise usually get amplified in HDR processing, and noise levels will be considerably less with most any DSLR..

One further word: If you're looking at the Nikon line, you probably don't want the D40, D40X, or D60 since, I believe, none of them offer auto exposure bracketing at all.http://www.pbase.com/morepix..

Comment #4

Http://hdr-photography.com/aeb.html.

Seems like 4 EV is a decent EV range for an entry level camera.Is it enough for HDR? Sometimes..

Andrew..

Comment #5

GaryDeM wrote:.

If you put camera into full auto matrix metering, take first shotnote fstop and shutter speed. put camera into full manual, see ifcamera still has the matrix fstop and shutter speed. if yes, thenusing shutter speed go up 2-4 shutter speeds 1 fstop worth of shutterspeed at a time. the back to matrix shutter speed and go down samenumber of shutter speeds..

Why use auto? Use aperture priority and choose the aperture you want. With auto the camera will choose a wide open aperture which is useless for a landscape. Then take as many exposures as you need, one exposing to the left of the histogram, one exposing to the right and a bunch in between at varying shutter speeds. Take at least 6 and use what you need for the HDR..

Auto exposure, auto bracketing, why do so many people these days want a magic one button solution to lazily get photos that they will then put in all kinds of effort to post process?..

Comment #6

Why use auto mode? why not it is a simple way of getting a base shutter speed for the scene in question. it also gives a EV for the scene this can be adjusted at any time prior to using the settings in manual mode. as for auto giving only a wideopen aperture, my dslr never does that. the only way it would is in very dim light. the auto or P mode work off the menu and the program line curve selected. my dslr is in normal mode for the program line.



I was at the toledo zoo tuesday. it was a sunny day, at iso 800 with my bignma the camera in auto was selecting anywhere from f8.0 to f13.0 with a shutter speed of near 1/1000 of a second. this is a long way from wideopen. also the selected shutter speed was fine for the use of a big telephoto like the bigma. it plenty of motion and antishake steadying power. what is so bad about the use of auto? I ALWAYS glance at the shutter speed and fstop selected to make sure it will work for the subject and shooting conditions.

In auto also gives me time to compose and get the shiot of a animal without worrying about settings. because I knew by that time at the zoo the selected settings are going to be ok..

By the way I am in my 38yr of shooting with a slr/dslr. 32 yrs with film slides. yes I know my way around a camera...

Comment #7

Tey112 wrote:.

I am thinking about getting the canon 400d. One of the things I wouldlike to be able to do is auto bracketing for HDR photos. Is the 400Da good choice for that or are the some other cameras that are betterthat are sub 500? Thanks.

While you can get great HDRs with software like Photomatix from only a few images, a lot of folks recommend 7-9 shots for optimal HDR with a scene that has an extreme tonal range. I've used as few as three and as many as 14, depending on what I was trying to achieve. The more smooth the graduations, the less artificial the look, so IMO, more is better. My camera (Nikon D2x) will autobracket 9 exposures, but I generally find myself bracketing manually anyway..

In your price range, you'll be hard-pressed to autobracket a large tonal range area, but spending on a good tripod and head that locks down well will take care of most of the issues with changing one exposure value anyway..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #8

Morepix wrote:.

You'll find several (but not all) DSLRs will bracket three exposures,and even some P&S cameras will (my Canon G7, for example). With threeexposures, you'd like to have exposure bracketing at 2-stop intervals(my G7 will do that too; so will my Nikon D70 and D80)..

What would be better is a camera that offers you 5 exposure (or more)auto-bracketing. The only cameras I know about that do that are theNikon D200, D300, and D3 (and maybe some of the D3's predecessors).However: (1) All these cameras cost $1,200 and up (some way up). (2)All three offer 9-exposure autobracketing, all at only 1-stop (orless) intervals. That gives you the same exposure range as 5 shots at2-stop intervals, but with more acreage used up on your memory card.(I guess on a D3, you'd be pushing 180 MB of images with 9 RAWexposures! A person could fill up a card real fast that way.).

You must use pretty small cards or are you shooting everything for HDR? I have yet to fill a 4GB card and I generally shoot RAW + JPEG. My D300 @ Raw +JPEG Fine shows roughly 140 shots Now granted I'm not shooting sporting events but I've never been close to filling the card..

In my experience, 3 shots is often, but not always, enough. I find myG7 excellent in many circumstances taking HDR exposures since it hastwo custom configuration options, where you can preset everything butISO. So I set one of those custom configs to shutter priority, with 3shots at 2-stop intervals and the LCD screen playback at off so's toget the three images as quickly as the camera is capable of (whichisn't all that quickly). Simple..

I do it hand-held, too, if the light level is reasonable and if I usePhotomatix for processing, which does a fine job of registeringimages. But if the light level gets too low, I need to resort to atripod and maybe manual exposure. (Remember, you always want to varythe shutter speed, not the aperture, for exposure bracketing.) Onething that makes a DSLR superior for HDR is that even low levels ofnoise usually get amplified in HDR processing, and noise levels willbe considerably less with most any DSLR..

One further word: If you're looking at the Nikon line, you probablydon't want the D40, D40X, or D60 since, I believe, none of them offerauto exposure bracketing at all.http://www.pbase.com/morepix..

Comment #9

No, I'm not shooting everything as HDR. My puny G7 doesn't even do RAW. All I'm saying is that if you do a fair amount of it, cards will fill up. 140 shots in a day doesn't seem a whole lot in my experience. When I get my D300 (soon!), I won't use RAW for HDR, and I'd want to have at least 2 4GB cards on hand to be sure I could get thru a productive day. That's all..

I'm off on a trip this summer with 45 shooting days. I like to provide for around 1 GB/day image storage, shooting mostly DSLR RAW. An 80 GB drive should do it. That just seems a lot, and add to it any reasonable amount of HDR with 3-5 images each, and you can use up a lot of acreage..

As Everett Dirksen once said about the Defense budget, a billion year, a billion there, pretty soon you're talking about real money. Same with HDR images..

Portlandscanner wrote:.

You must use pretty small cards or are you shooting everything forHDR? I have yet to fill a 4GB card and I generally shoot RAW + JPEG.My D300 @ Raw +JPEG Fine shows roughly 140 shots Now granted I'mnot shooting sporting events but I've never been close to filling thecard...

Comment #10

Use manual mode with fixed aperture and change only the shutter speed. Get +/- 5 stops for best HDR effect...

Comment #11

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