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SuperZOOM or DSLR
I am looking to step up to a camera with a large zoom. 10-12x should be fine.I m debating between a super zoom model and an DSLR.Here are my main requirements.....

- Single lense across the whole zoom range (wide angle to ~12x)- Decent flash performance for inside shooting.

- I will be taking a lot of pictures at kids performances in a gymnasium settings(This requires the larger zoom)- Good performance shooting outside shots of kids sports- Total automatic operation as an option- Autofocus- image stabilization- Fast indoors shot-to-shot time with the flash- Relatively compact size.

In the superzoom category I am considering these:Panasonic FZ-8 (Not sure if the wide angle is wide enough at 36mm).

Panasonic FZ-18 (I have read negative reviews of the camera's focus performance in low light conditions)Canon S5 IS (2 seconds between flash shots seems long)Finepix S8000fdOther good choices???.

I am considering a DSLR due to slow shot-to-shot times with the super zoom.Here are the dSLR's I am considering....

Olympus E-510Pentax K10DCanon Rebel XTiSony Alpha A100Nikon D40x.

I wouldn't mind going the dSLR route if I can find one that can operate in automatic mode much like a p & S and I can find a single lense that's around 28mm-400mm..

I have a Sony DSC90 video camera with 10x zoom. I like the zoom for taking pictures, but it does not scale down on the wide angle side enough for me..

Recommendations??.

Thanks,jmgil..

Comments (5)

Jmgil wrote:.

I wouldn't mind going the dSLR route if I can find one that canoperate in automatic mode much like a p & S and I can find a singlelense that's around 28mm-400mm..

You'll find an Auto position on the mode dial of virtually any modern DSLR model..

As for a lens with that much focal range from wide to long, look at the new Tamron 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3.

On an entry level Nikon, Pentax, or Sony DSLR, this lens would give you roughly the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-375mm lens on a 35mm camera (just multiply by 1.5 to see how a lens compares for models using a Sony APS-C size sensor). It would appear to be slightly longer on an entry level Canon (multiply by 1.6)..

Because the sensors in entry level DSLR models are smaller than film, you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification) for any given focal length compared to a 35mm camera. That's why most of the DSLR kit lenses start out at around 18mm (because they will appear to be longer)..

JimChttp://www.pbase.com/jcockfield..

Comment #1

I would go for a DSLR simply because of the better AF system, speed and flash options. The zoom range can be catered for with the following Tamron lens:.

Http://www.dpreview.com/news/0712/07120402tamron18250.asp.

Of course, this is a much more expensive option that a Superzoom and I am very happy with my Fuji S6500 but realise it's shortcomings as a 'sports' camera. It's low light image quality is good but the lack of IS and inferior (to DSLR) AF system make it difficult to use in these situation..

Cheers..

Comment #2

I suggest a DSLR for what you are listing as what you want to shoot. For sports no point and shoot will be anywhere near as fast as a DSLR. I use the E510 and have been very happy with it. With the 2 lens kit you get the equiv of a 28-300mm in 35mm world and that is very adaquate for most of you have discussed..

All DSLRs will have an Auto Mode some with have in camera IS and a couple will have dust protection systems. Few will have all 3..

Here are a couple of shots of mine for you to judge capabilities for yourself. Remember most DSLRs that you have listed will shoot at least 3 frames/sec. All these are taken with the kit lens. The tennis is at the US Open and were taken from the stands under the lights..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Olympus E-500, Olympus E-510..

Comment #3

One superzoom to look at is the Panasonic FZ50:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

It is the top of the line out of all of the superzooms!.

The 10MP FZ50 operates like a DSLR, but has a 35-420mm Leica lens built in!.

And the built-in pop up flash has a range of 24 feet!.

It's not a DSLR.but the next best thing!.

J. D.Colorful Colorado.

From my Olympus E-510:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Remember.always keep the box and everything that came in it!..

Comment #4

I think you should go for a DSLR with your requirements:.

Jmgil wrote:.

- Single lense across the whole zoom range (wide angle to ~12x).

The quality of the superzooms (10x, 12x, ...) is getting better, but I would consider to take a two lens combo for a DSLR. That should be lighter, cheaper and of better quality.

- Decent flash performance for inside shooting.

> external flash (DSLR or FZ-50 or S9x00).

- I will be taking a lot of pictures at kids performances in agymnasium settings.

> good AF and usable high ISO = DSLR.

(This requires the larger zoom).

Superzooms (like the Tamron 18-250) are having a quite small aparture at tele settings. I would really think about not taking one lens for everything. There are reasons why you can change lenses with a (D)SLR.

- Good performance shooting outside shots of kids sports.

> You need tele. In good lightning conditions this can be done with a Bridge, too, but for higher fps you'll have to go DSLR.

- Total automatic operation as an option.

> Every camera you might consider has an automatic mode.

- Autofocus.

> Every camera you might consider has an AF. Only D40(x) has some restrictions, but the lenses that might be interesting for you all can AF with D40.

- image stabilization.

> That's a nice-to-have, but only usefull in certain situations. E.g. for the tele shots it might help. But be aware, that it only helps against the movements of the camera, it can't stop an object moving, that you take a photo of!.

- Fast indoors shot-to-shot time with the flash.

> external flash (as I wrote above).

- Relatively compact size.

> this does not fit very much with your other requirements, you'll have to find a compromise..

In the superzoom category I am considering these:Panasonic FZ-8 (Not sure if the wide angle is wide enough at 36mm).

This depends on the images you shoot. 36mm would be far to narrow for me. There is a really huge difference to 28mm!!.

Panasonic FZ-18 (I have read negative reviews of the camera's focusperformance in low light conditions)Canon S5 IS (2 seconds between flash shots seems long)Finepix S8000fdOther good choices???.

Fuji S6x00 or S9x00, but they are big and don't have IS and "only" 28-300. There low-light-capability is a bit better than with other P&S (especially S6x00), but there's still a huge difference to a DSLR. This is due to the different sensor size (have a look here: http://www.dpreview.com/...learn/?/Glossary/Camera_System/sensor_sizes_01.htm ).

I am considering a DSLR due to slow shot-to-shot times with the superzoom.Here are the dSLR's I am considering....

Olympus E-510Pentax K10DCanon Rebel XTiSony Alpha A100Nikon D40x.

I wouldn't mind going the dSLR route if I can find one that canoperate in automatic mode much like a p & S and I can find a singlelense that's around 28mm-400mm..

You can take wonderful pictures with all those cameras. But: It's still the person behind the camera that takes the picture, the camera is only the instrument. You should invest in one (or more) good books about photography, that will improve the quality of your pictures much more than a 2000$ camera!.

The smallest of these cameras are the Nikon and the Olympus. The D40 is the most entry-level I think. Not in terms of image quality, but in terms of being easy to use for someone who does not have much (or no) experience with a (D)SLR..

If you really want to stick to the one-lens option, you could take D40 (Do you relly need the 'x'?) with the 18-200 VR (stabilized), that would be equal to 28-300mm on a fullframe. Or you could take the double-zoom-kit (18-55-200). If you want stabilization, make sure, that you buy the VR-version of the 55-200. The VR-version of the 18-55 should soon be available as a kit, too..

> Of course there are similar combinations from other manufacturers, too!.

One last thing: Go to a big shop and take the cameras you consider in your hand, take a few photos. You'll notice which camera(s) feel good in your hand. To give you an example: For me a D40 would be way too small. It just doesn't fit in my hands...

Comment #5

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