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sunny 16 rule
Does this rule applies to all camera? and what aperture to use indoor?..

Comments (14)

New_type wrote:.

Does this rule applies to all camera? and what aperture to use indoor?.

It's a rough estimate to get you in the ball park with all camera's, digital and film..

It tells you nothing about indoors. Nor does it tell you much about tricky outdoor conditions..

On boxes of film they used to print rough exposure guidelines. For outdoor the sunny 16 rule of thumb was printed. For indoors it was around 1/30 sec shutter at f/1.4 for iso 400. Of course negative film has more exposure latitude (forgiveness) than digital and a lab tech printing your photo's would make adjustments..

With digital it's more of do it yourself. Experience will teach you how to get the most appropriate exposure. The better the exposure the less post processing you'll need to do and the better the results...

Comment #1

The reason the Sunny 16 rule is as reliable as it is.....

[which is actually VERY reliable].

...... is because OUTDOOR light levels are surprisingly stable, and altered by relatively few factors, principle among which are the weather conditions.... (cloudy bright, cloudy dull etc.) These different conditions are not too hard to gauge pretty accurately by eye..

Light levels indoors are much more variable, and this makes a rule, or a table extending from a rule, a much more complicated thing to frame.... and also rather more difficult to estimate parameters in use..

Notwithstanding the above, Kodak used to publish an Exposure Guide specifically for Kodak films and for particular types of SUBJECTS, as distinct from evaluating likely light levels from a rule of thumb and working from there. So it was that a recommended shutter speed and aperture combination was provide for use inside Museums, at the Circus, outdoor Stadia at night, shooting fireworks, etc. etc..

Like a lot of information gained by genuine experience, Kodak's guide was surprisingly accurate in use..

Unfortunately I have not been able to find it reproduced on the net.... Perhaps an extended search will reveal it... [?]Regards,Baz..

Comment #2

Do pros use this rule? I am a newbie and I don't know what setting to use, so I will have to keep trying and memorise it?.

Do pro use auto mode at all?..

Comment #3

I use AV mode for outdoors and landscapes....TV mode for sports actionand manual mode for flash indoors....sometimes P mode for flashGenerally use F8 to 11 aperture and iso 200 outdoors in AV mode.

Bill,Jr'I kind of like the Earth, it's where I keep all my Stuff.'Website; http://www.pbase.com/wboth125 Lake Wylie, SC..

Comment #4

From Kodak's website - general guidelines for a variety of film types and conditions.

Http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consumer/products/techInfo/ac61/#50714.

Best regards,Doughttp://pbase.com/dougj.

Http://thescambaiter.comFighting scammers WW for fun & justice..

Comment #5

Most pros don't need to think about that rule. Most shooting is done in manual. The camera indicates a basic exposure and it is adjusted to meet the requirements of the lighting. After an initial exposure the histogram is checked (digital) and then the exposure is dialed in if needed. If you had no built in light meter memorizing rules might be more necessary...

Comment #6

Doug J wrote:.

From Kodak's website - general guidelines for a variety of film typesand conditions.

Http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consumer/products/techInfo/ac61/#50714.

Yes. It was good of you to run it to earth. Well done!.

It looks like the "successor" document to the version I used to carry with me many years ago. Mine was printed on high quality card with a wipe-clean surface... and showed predecessor film types, naturally... but otherwise it is the same..

I can also vouch for it's accuracy as a guide to exposure.....

Although I didn't use it much as a prime source, I did back reference the exposures I got from successful metering under available light conditions, and they matched with that guide pretty well. Regards,Baz..

Comment #7

New_type wrote:.

Do pros use this rule? I am a newbie and I don't know what setting touse, so I will have to keep trying and memorise it?.

Do pro use auto mode at all?.

Pros use the various Auto modes all the time... except for the times when they don't, that is!! .

Myself, I have used the Sunny 16 rule [in earnest and because I had to] for just one day in my pro career, when I found the exposure meter lurking under the seat of my vehicle only AFTER I had concluded the day's shooting!!Regards,Baz..

Comment #8

The rule even works if you are photographing the moon, because the lit up part is in full sun.Joel Orlinsky.

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Comment #9

Assuming you are using a digital camera, you can automatically check what the correct exposure is at different shutterspeeds or apertures for indoor lighting situations on the camera. I would say for indoor lighting, the ISO should be 400 or 800 or filmspeed to get a fast enough shutterspeed at F/3.3 or 4 in a not really bright room.Will..

Comment #10

Both these photos were shot at 400 ISO. The indoor shot was fairly bright for a family gathering and the outdoor shot is in the afternoon on a sunny day. - Will.

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Shutterspeed: 1/20F/ 2.4ISO 400Fuji S328mm.

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Shutterspeed: 1/250F/9.5ISO 400Fuji S360mm..

Comment #11

Hi,.

It might be a good idea to point out that cameras have been around for, say, 165 years or so and exposure meters have only been around since the 1930's and very few could afford them in those days. So we used experience and tables like the BSI "Photographic Exposure Tables" or the bit of paper that came in the film box or (later on) was printed on the inside of the box. And every photographic book up to the 60's had pages about it..

I'm sure all us old ones have met elderly photographs when we were younger who set the exposure by looking at the sky and subject and who didn't use range-finders either because they could estimate the distance as well as the exposure accurately enough. And, I ought to add that film can be + or - 2 or 3 stops out and still work OK. Apart from reversal....

Funny thing but look up most _pro- films on the makers' websites and they'll still have a data sheet with exposure tables in them..

And here's an interesting site:.

Http://website.lineone.net/...don/Exp.Calculators/Exposure%20Calculators.html.

Have fun..

Regards, David..

Comment #12

I have a Lumix L1, and I set it on automatic, most of the time. I have found the camera's computer is more accurate than I ever could be..

I never used the sunny 16 rule. If I used a manual camera, I brought along an incident meter...

Comment #13

David Hughes wrote:.

Hi,.

It might be a good idea to point out that cameras have been aroundfor, say, 165 years or so and exposure meters have only been aroundsince the 1930's and very few could afford them in those days. So weused experience and tables like the BSI "Photographic ExposureTables" or the bit of paper that came in the film box or (later on)was printed on the inside of the box. And every photographic book upto the 60's had pages about it..

I'm sure all us old ones have met elderly photographs when we wereyounger who set the exposure by looking at the sky and subject andwho didn't use range-finders either because they could estimate thedistance as well as the exposure accurately enough. And, I ought toadd that film can be + or - 2 or 3 stops out and still work OK. Apartfrom reversal....

Funny thing but look up most _pro- films on the makers' websites andthey'll still have a data sheet with exposure tables in them..

And here's an interesting site:.

Http://website.lineone.net/...don/Exp.Calculators/Exposure%20Calculators.html.

Have fun..

Regards, David..

Comment #14

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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