snubbr.com

Sports Photography - Camera/Lens Help
As part of a new hobby/weekend business, I would like to be able to take respectable/quality sports photos to drive people to my website as a way of promoting it. I am currently taking a night class on sports photography, but am using a borrowed Canon Rebel (pre-XT version). Most people in the class are novice SLR users and have taken some really nice pics that I would be proud of. Is it the user or the equipment or a little of both? I would like to purchase an SLR of my own, but am unsure of what I can get on my current budget..

I need a camera/lens with a shutter speed that will create crisp frozen shots, allow zooming enough to shoot most scholastic/children's sporting events, and as wide an aperture as my budget will allow..

With a combination of these factors, what suggestions do you have to produce respectable (not airtight professional) photos on a $1,200 budget? Do I even have options?.

Any feedback is greatly appreciated!..

Comments (14)

If you buy the 400D and stretch a budget a bit, you can get the 70-200 f2.8L..

A cheaper alternative is the same camera and the 85mm 1.8, or the 200mm f2.8 if you don't need zoom. Just add the kit lens for everyday shots. Johnnyhttp://tuxbailey.zenfolio.com..

Comment #1

1. Not all sports are the same from a photography perspective.2. You have a LOT to learn.3. This subject has been discussed thousands of times.4. Search is working...I got 4,190 hits on "Sports Photography"..

Sandlot29 wrote:.

As part of a new hobby/weekend business, I would like to be able totake respectable/quality sports photos to drive people to my websiteas a way of promoting it. I am currently taking a night class onsports photography, but am using a borrowed Canon Rebel (pre-XTversion). Most people in the class are novice SLR users and havetaken some really nice pics that I would be proud of. Is it the useror the equipment or a little of both? I would like to purchase anSLR of my own, but am unsure of what I can get on my current budget..

I need a camera/lens with a shutter speed that will create crispfrozen shots, allow zooming enough to shoot mostscholastic/children's sporting events, and as wide an aperture as mybudget will allow..

With a combination of these factors, what suggestions do you have toproduce respectable (not airtight professional) photos on a $1,200budget? Do I even have options?.

Any feedback is greatly appreciated!.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #2

Yes, I do have a LOT to learn. That is why I am posting my question on the Beginner's section. I am looking for some specifics and guidance, not jabs about the obvious...

Comment #3

He's not really jabbing at you. It's just that you didn't give much in the way of specifics..

The question you asked has been asked several hundred times in the last 12 months. His suggestion was that if you did a search, you could maybe glean considerably more than asking that question again. The reason is that there are only a few people on at one time. Maybe during the search you'll find hundreds of better answers..

Personally, I don't mind answering the same question over and over. Heck, my opinion is just mine and I like to answer. I think he was suggesting it as a tip...

Comment #4

Sandlot29 wrote:.

Yes, I do have a LOT to learn. That is why I am posting my questionon the Beginner's section. I am looking for some specifics andguidance, not jabs about the obvious..

Sandlot29:.

What specific types of sports will you be shooting, and will they be outdoor in daylight, or under artifical lighting indoors?.

Outdoor daytime sports are the easiest to shoot, and indoor the most difficult. It's also important to know where you'll be shooting from. If you're able to get close to the action, you might not need a monster lense. But if you're shooting from the cheap seats, a long lense is needed..

I shoot almost exclusively with a Sigma 50-500mm zoom lense. It's not the best for indoor artificial light, but it works great for daytime outdoors work. The 50-500 costs about $1,200 new, but you might be able to find one used..

I wouldn't advise going with anything less than a 300mm lense, and if you have a choice of saving money on the lense or on the camera, don't scrimp on the lense. There are a lot of good deals on used equipment at EBay and at the bigger camera stores, like B&H Photo..

Once you have a few cameras in mind, go to PBase.com and look in their "Camera database" galleries for those specific cameras, and lenses. There are thousands of examples to look through and to compare, all shot by "real people" rather than pros hired by the camera manufacturer..

Feel free to email me if you have more questions..

..

Comment #5

Sandlot29 wrote:.

Yes, I do have a LOT to learn. That is why I am posting my questionon the Beginner's section. I am looking for some specifics andguidance, not jabs about the obvious..

As the others have suggested, we need to know EXACTLY what type sports venues you intend to shoot. Beginners who show that they are trying to help themselves always get better responses..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #6

ElanToXT wrote:.

If you buy the 400D and stretch a budget a bit, you can get the70-200 f2.8L..

A cheaper alternative is the same camera and the 85mm 1.8, or the200mm f2.8 if you don't need zoom. Just add the kit lens foreveryday shots. Johnnyhttp://tuxbailey.zenfolio.com.

Without knowing the specifics of your intended sports the above advice would really cover alot of territory for you and I'll second that recommendation as to the camera and lenses..

Canon is supposed to have the edge over Nikon when it comes to long telephotos.

And therefore is more often used by pros when shooting sports and wildlife. If you go to a sporting event check out how many gray lens are being used as compared to black and you can gage for yourself how many photographers are using Canon. (I use a Nikon d50 and 85 1.8 to shoot high school basketball.).

You mentioned you're taking a sports photography class. Check with your teacher and see what he/she recommends. I'll bet it will be the same as what is mentioned by Johnny..

Good luck...

Comment #7

Having been a photojournalist/freelancer for more than two decades, I've shot literally thousands of sporting events..

I personally chose not to use a lens longer than 200mm for most sports..

Better to have room in the photo to crop a bit than to find yourself zoomed in too far most of the time..

I never used zoom lenses for sports.only primes..

And, what many people often forget is that the longer the telephoto lens you are using, you'll need a faster shutter speed to stop the action..

Indoors, you'll be lucky to ever get 1/250th of a second at 3200 ISO, which is basically the MINIMUM shutter speed you'll need to stop the action!.

Skip the Canon Rebel series or Nikon D40/40x/60.none of these go up to 3200 ISO..

You'll need to go with the Canon 30D/40D or Nikon D200/300 to get those higher ISO's and the frame rate to get action shots..

And, the most important thing to remember about sports action photography.if you can't see the ball or puck, the shot is not much good!.

J. D.Colorful Colorado.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Remember.always keep your receipt, the box, and everything that came in it!..

Comment #8

From an earlier post......

Sports shooting 40D.

Shot today with my 40D and 200 f/2.8L lens. We (Packers) lost 13-12. Used Av mode, ISO200, f/2.8, Ai Servo AF, center focus point, Daylight WB and CWA metering..

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=25023699.

Canon EOS 40D/30D/20D/10DSubject 40D, Packers vs. Bucs (Youth Flag Football Game)Posted by BryanP [CLICK FOR PROFILE]Date/Time 4:31:36 AM, Sunday, September 30, 2007 (GMT).

40D AF, really improved, incredibly fasthttp://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=25296331.

Bill,Jr'I kind of like the Earth, it's where I keep all my Stuff.'Website; http://www.pbase.com/wboth125 Lake Wylie, SC..

Comment #9

Just a few questions since I am interested in sports photography....

And trying to learn more about it. I try shooting my kids soccer games using the D80 and 55-200 vr (lack of funds). I have tried the 50mm 1.8 for indoor basketball also..

MusicDoctorDJ wrote:.

Having been a photojournalist/freelancer for more than two decades,I've shot literally thousands of sporting events..

I personally chose not to use a lens longer than 200mm for most sports..

Better to have room in the photo to crop a bit than to find yourselfzoomed in too far most of the time..

I never used zoom lenses for sports.only primes..

Why is this?It seems very restrictive, to a certain fixed distance from the action..

And, what many people often forget is that the longer the telephotolens you are using, you'll need a faster shutter speed to stop theaction..

Do you think vr lens help (or should be considered) at these speeds?.

Indoors, you'll be lucky to ever get 1/250th of a second at 3200 ISO,which is basically the MINIMUM shutter speed you'll need to stop theaction!.

Do you ever use flash?.

Skip the Canon Rebel series or Nikon D40/40x/60.none of thesego up to 3200 ISO..

You'll need to go with the Canon 30D/40D or Nikon D200/300 to getthose higher ISO's and the frame rate to get action shots..

Yea my D80 at 3 fps seems slow and the focus time is not great, and ISO3200 is not very good. I would love to try the D300!!! with high quality fast glass....

And, the most important thing to remember about sports actionphotography.if you can't see the ball or puck, the shot is notmuch good!.

Yea, but pp can work wonders!! Sometimes I cheat and add the ball where it looks good, or even great..

J. D.Colorful Colorado.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Remember.always keep your receipt, the box, and everything thatcame in it!..

Comment #10

Consider visitinghttp://www.sportsshooter.com.

'Nice pen, bet you write good stories with it.'..

Comment #11

Some general guidelines IMO....

1) Positioning is IMO the most important factor to consider to get a great looking sports shot. Get as low as possible as you want a lot of separation between the subject and the background. The sideline is great for getting photos of players' sides and back - so try behind the goals, or in the corner.

2) If you are shooting in enough light to get shutter speeds of more than 1/400, say, then turn off VR/IS. I find that it normally takes a split second to engage, and I want AF to lock on as quick as possible..

3) You don't need a f/2.8 lens or 5fps+ bodyto get great shots, but it makes it a hell of a lot easier...

Comment #12

Ed Grenzig wrote:.

I never used zoom lenses for sports.only primes..

Why is this?It seems very restrictive, to a certain fixed distance from the action..

I'm guessing that he chooses prime lenses for speed..

Prime lenses are often faster than even the fastest zooms. f/2.8 is rather slow for a prime lens (unless it's an extremely long telephoto), whereas f/2.8 is as good as it usually gets on zooms..

Do you think vr lens help (or should be considered) at these speeds?.

IS/VR won't help stop subject motion. It will only help with hand shake, if you're hand-holding the camera..

A faster shutter speed will help both with subject motion and with hand shake so the priority should be faster lenses and higher ISOs first (to get faster shutter speeds), IS/VR second (for any incremental improvement)...

Comment #13

Sandlot29 wrote:.

Is it the user or the equipment or a little of both?.

Both equipment does help getting your subject in focus, but if you are really familiar with your subject, you can prefocus on the spot where the action is most likely to happen. Exposure is the same. A great pro camera will get the exposure without much input. But a good photographer will know the exposure needed form the meter reading, chimping and experience..

With a combination of these factors, what suggestions do you have toproduce respectable (not airtight professional) photos on a $1,200budget? Do I even have options?.

Try getting a second generation pro camera body and used lens of decent quality. As for which one, what exactly you intend to shoot would decide that.Chris, Broussard, LA..

Comment #14

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.