snubbr.com

shutter speed
Hi,.

I am a beginner and I have a basic question about the shutter speed..

I have noticed that the faster the shutter speed is, the larger the time between pressing the shutter bottom and capturing the image is..

It has caused me to miss pictures of moving objets, because when the camera actually takes the picture, the object has already moved from it's previous position and is out of frame..

Could someone explain what happens when using higher shutter speeds?.

Thanks a lot,jc..

Comments (14)

Jctgf wrote:.

Hi,.

I am a beginner and I have a basic question about the shutter speed..

I have noticed that the faster the shutter speed is, the larger thetime between pressing the shutter bottom and capturing the image is..

It has caused me to miss pictures of moving objects, because when thecamera actually takes the picture, the object has already moved fromits previous position and is out of frame..

Could someone explain what happens when using higher shutter speeds?.

Thanks a lot,jc.

OK,.

The NUMBER is a fraction, not a whole number...so250 = 1/250s125 = 1/125s50 = 1/50s.

See how the fraction shows you that higher numbers are really "Shorter" times.....

1/125s is 2x as fast as 1/60s....or in other words....it takes 2 1/60s to equal 1 1/125s (I know it is 1/005s off...not enough to haggle over for a beginner question).

So if you want to stop action...use 1/320s or above for most cases for standard zoom of 18-55 or 18-85..If you have a zoom tele that goes past 200mm on a crop camera..Use 450 or above..

The guide line for the lowest speed for any given focal length (FL) is to make the FL you are using a fraction under 1.......using a FL of 85mm, use 1/85s or faster....using a FL of 250mm, use 1/250s or faster....With a Crop camera, use the next higher speed. But this guide is for camera shake and lens FL...The higher your FL. the more YOUR camera movement is magnified.....So you have to use a faster speed to effectively stop action AND Camera Shake..

To stop action (like kids ball games), a 1/320s to 1/1000s will work well. The subject movement will determine this...A kid swinging a bat at a ball..1/320s will work out...A kid sliding in home plate...1/500s or 1/1000s will be better..

Hope this helps.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Peter .

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Enjoy your photography images, even if your wife doesn't ! ;-(http://laurence-photography.com/http://www.pbase.com/peterarbib/Cameras in profile...

Comment #1

I assume, you didnot state otherwise, that you are using a p&s. there is always a delay in the shutter firing between the ti me you push it and it actually fires. the camera has to meter , set the fstop and shutter speed, and fire the shutter after you push the button. this a builtin problem with all p&s cameras. if you check the cheaper p&s against the more expensive you will find that the situation is even worse with the cheaper units..

This is one of the more important reasons why people buy dslrs. the delay is almost zero with a dslr. you can aim and fire at a moving object with a dslr and expect to have the image caught on the sensor...

Comment #2

Jctgf wrote:.

Hi,.

I am a beginner and I have a basic question about the shutter speed..

I have noticed that the faster the shutter speed is, the larger thetime between pressing the shutter bottom and capturing the image is..

The lag between shutter press and capture is affected by many things..

If the object or person is moving toward or away from you the auto focus may take longer to determine accurate focus, thus delaying the taking of the picture..

It has caused me to miss pictures of moving objets, because when thecamera actually takes the picture, the object has already moved fromits previous position and is out of frame..

This is why you should learn to pan with the moving object. Smoothly follow the action and press the shutter, but continue to follow the object untill after the picture is taken..

Could someone explain what happens when using higher shutter speeds?.

Thanks a lot,jc.

Answered above by udaman (Peter).

A member of the rabble in good standing...

Comment #3

Hello,.

My camera is a canon 710is..

Could the delay I am experiencing be caused by limitations of this model?.

Thanks,jc.

Ps.: I am trying to use the tv mode. I set the sutter speed and let the camera determine the aperture...

Comment #4

Hello,.

Thank you very much for your answer..

My doubt is if this delay I am experiencing is caused by the high sutter speed I am trying to use or is it because of a limitation of my camera (canon 710is)..

Thanks again!.

Jc..

Comment #5

Setting a higher shutter speed does not make the camera itself operate faster. Its the nature of the animal. You need to pre focus if you can on the area that the action is going to happen in and then try and capture at that perfect moment..

It is going to be tough with a PS..

Good luck!.

Thanks,.

Digitalshooter!.

'Your current gear is always all you need, until the new stuff comes out!'..

Comment #6

Your 710is is a canon p&s. all point and shoots have a delay after you push the shutter. it the nature of the a p&s. the possible way to do better is anticipate where the action you are trying to capture will be when the shutter fires and be aiming there. not where you inially pushn the shutter button..

There only way around the problem, and eliminate it altogether, is to get a dslr. these cameras, do not have any real shutter delay, and what you shoot and aim at is what you get...

Comment #7

You have run into the limit of your camera's capabilities..S.**My XT IS Full Frame APS-C/FF of course!*****So is my 5D 35mm/FF**..

Comment #8

You can mimimise this annoying delay by pre-focussing; point the camera where you want to take the picture (e.g. a base, pitchers mound, goal mouth, whatever) and press the shutter button HALF way down. The camera focuses where you point it and sets the exposure; these will not change as long as you do not release the shutter button..

Then sit there iwth the camera to your eye and your finger aching... maintaining the pressure... and take the picture at the right moment. It will be instant because the focussing and expsure are already set..

Of course you can;t use this if you are trying to take a picture of a moving target, so try to plan where something interesting is likely to happen, prefocus on that spot, and wait....

Best wishesMike..

Comment #9

You got some good answers and some bad answers (which is normal)....

Jctgf wrote:.

Hi,.

I am a beginner and I have a basic question about the shutter speed..

I have noticed that the faster the shutter speed is, the larger thetime between pressing the shutter bottom and capturing the image is..

There is no correlation between the shutter speed and the time a camera STARTS to take an exposure. There ARE things that affect it, but the shutter speed is not one of them..

It has caused me to miss pictures of moving objets, because when thecamera actually takes the picture, the object has already moved fromits previous position and is out of frame..

Your camera, the Canon 710 IS is not designed to have extremely fast operation. But it WILL take the pictures you are wanting, IF you learn how to use it..

Could someone explain what happens when using higher shutter speeds?.

No, but I CAN explain what happens when you take a picture..

The shutter button has two positions. When you slowly and gently push the shutter button, you will feel the resistance (to being pushed) rise and suddenly fall, at which point the camera will perform Auto Focus (AF) and set the exposure. On your camera, this takes between 0.53 and 0.64 seconds according to Imaging-Resource. This is called "prefocusing". As long as you maintain the correct pressure, the camera will hold the settings indefinately. When you press the shutter button with more force, the resistance will AGAIN rise and fall, at which point the camera will capture the scene.

You can read these numbers here:.

Http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/A710/A710A.HTM.

As others have commented, you should ALWAYS prefocus by using a half-press..

DSLRs ARE generally faster when doing AF. This is because they do AF differently than your Canon 710 IS, which uses a contrast detection technique, which is very much like how humans focus...move the focus point until the high-contrast areas in a scene look sharp. In contrast, dSLRs use a phase AF technique, which involves observing the scene with a SECOND sensor that tells the camera two things: 1) in which direction to move the focus and 2) approximately how far to adjust it. This gives the dSLR a big advantage. However, it is an "open loop" control scheme. The contrast AF on your camera is a "closed loop" system.



In contrast, non-dSLRs are generally faster after focus lock (when the green light comes on). This is because on a dSLR, it has to flip the mirror up, out of the way before a picture can be taken. On the fastest dSLR this is about 0.05 second and most dSLRs take about 0.150 seconds to start taking the exposure. Thus your camera, which delays only 0.067 seconds, is faster than the average dSLR. If you can't learn how to capture a shot of a moving subject with your camera, you will be worse off with a dSLR..

A dSLR DOES AF faster. Where your camera takes about 0.6 seconds, a typical dSLR takes about 0.15 seconds...that's 4X faster! But, in general, cameras w/o a mirror have lower "shutter lag". Some mirror-less cameras have a shutter delay of as little as 0.005 seconds!.

I strongly suspect that your problem is simply a failure to pre-focus/half-press. Instead, you probably just "stab" the shutter button, blissfully unaware of what this causes..

If you "stab" the shutter button, your camera takes between 0.606 and 0.716 seconds to start taking the picture!.

There are other things you must understand too:.

1. Most contrast AF cameras only focus on vertical features.2. Contrast AF requires, er, "contrast"!.

3. If you try to focus on a low-contrast area of a scene, your camera will either fail to focus or take a L O N G time..

4. If the subject is moving quickly, the image of that subject will be moving on the sensor (unless you pan correctly) and this will make the camera slow to focus..

Put #1 and #4 together... if the subject is moving horizontally, as most moving things do, and you don't pan, vertical features are blurred more than horizontal features. This makes it doubly difficult for your camera to AF successfully..

Perhaps you instinctively raise the shutter speed when trying to photograph fast subjects and have incorrectly correlated the shutter speed as the cause of your slow AF speed? The shutter speed really has no direct effect. When you said, "...the object has already moved from it's previous position and is out of frame..." tells me that you are not panning AT ALL!.

Bottom Line:.

1. Learn to ALWAYS half-press.2. Learn to pan accurately when the subject is moving..

3. You have to do BOTH these at the same time, ie, pan and half-press...then full-press..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #10

Thank you very much!.

Thank you very much indeed!.

Regards,jc..

Comment #11

JC, Charlie Davis gave you the best explanation of it's kind I have ever seen on any Forum. He clearly knows what he is talking about and he knows how to present it accurately and lucidly. You should read that material over and over. Good Luck!Judy..

Comment #12

JC, it is generally very informative to read any of "chuxter's" posts. He's a "living treasure" on these forums!..

Comment #13

Judy and Mike, thanks for the very kind words....

I feel more like a "legend in my own mind" than I did this morning. .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #14

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.