snubbr.com

Sharpening and RAW
When you PP a raw image, how do you know how much (if any) sharpening to apply?.

How do you know if it's too much or too less? Or is it always in the eye of the beholder what's sharp and what's soft? Or is there one setting that is optimal?..

Comments (8)

Linslus wrote:.

When you PP a raw image, how do you know how much (if any) sharpeningto apply?How do you know if it's too much or too less? Or is it always in theeye of the beholder what's sharp and what's soft? Or is there onesetting that is optimal?.

Sharpening is like adjusting the focus on binoculars or a telescope. You want to clarify the finest detail. If you go too far you'll start to see what's called halos, which are fine white lines around edges in high contrast areas..

That said, there's no law saying you have to achieve maximal sharpness; if you have an aesthetic preference for softness, that's fine...

Comment #1

Would a good rule be to sharpen and stop just before those while lines and halos begin to appear?..

Comment #2

Linslus wrote:.

Would a good rule be to sharpen and stop just before those whilelines and halos begin to appear?.

More or less. Google 'unsharp mask tutorial' for all you ever needed to know..

I usually start with amount 100 - 200%, radius about 0.5 pixels, threshold 0 - 2 and (which does a good job on most pics) and take it from there..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #3

Depends on what you plan on doing with the photo, print size or web display, makes a difference to how much sharpening you can get away with..

Larger images can handle more sharpening..

Sharpening should be done after all other adjustments in PP.View at 100% and adjust the percentage slider, if you see halo's back it off..

You can squeeze a little more sharpening if you copy the background layer before you sharpen and sharpen the new layer. Where you see halos you can go around with the eraser brush and erase them leaving the background layer visible..

I like to start with between 80-150%, 1 radius, and 0 threshold and work from there...

Comment #4

BA baracus wrote:.

Depends on what you plan on doing with the photo, print size or webdisplay, makes a difference to how much sharpening you can get awaywith..

Larger images can handle more sharpening..

I mean larger image as in 10mp camera's image vs 6mp, and it really depends..

Sharpening should be done after all other adjustments in PP.View at 100% and adjust the percentage slider, if you see halo's backit off..

You can squeeze a little more sharpening if you copy the backgroundlayer before you sharpen and sharpen the new layer. Where you seehalos you can go around with the eraser brush and erase them leavingthe background layer visible..

I like to start with between 80-150%, 1 radius, and 0 threshold andwork from there..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

These are some of those questions that don't really have an exact answer, but I'll try to address them as I can..

Linslus wrote:.

When you PP a raw image, how do you know how much (if any) sharpeningto apply?.

I have Lightroom set to apply a little base sharpening on import. This cleans up some softness due to the anti-aliasing filter over the sensor. Most cameras will need a little. How much will depend on the camera and possibly the ISO used. (You'll probably want less at higher ISO, but again, YMMV.).

For most shots, that's all they ever see. Ones I reduce for web may or may not get any further sharpening. It really depends on how it will be used and how it looks after reduction. (Oddly enough, stuff I export from LR doesn't need it as much as images I edit in PS then reduce.).

Print files rarely get any more sharpening since the lab I use does a great job without it and it is very easy to overdo it on smaller prints. Larger prints I might apply a little, but not much..

How do you know if it's too much or too less? Or is it always in theeye of the beholder what's sharp and what's soft? Or is there onesetting that is optimal?.

Pretty much the middle one. Too much is when it starts to show haloes or artifacts, too little is when it is still soft. With experince will come the knowledge of when to back off or push forward..

Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #6

To sharpen, you could try unsharp on the blue channel only and then combine back to full colour..

Also try out Focus Magic. For slightly soft images, this is great..

Jamesza..

Comment #7

Sharpening comes in two flavors: image optimization and output sharpening..

Sharpening for optimization is %100 about making the image look it's best prior to outputting to print or web. I use Adobe Camera Raw/Lightroom for this task; it has a very powerful set of sharpening tools designed for optimization..

If you're using the same program view your image at full resolution (1:1) and adjust the sharpening sliders to taste. I've made 4 presets (wide edge, medium edge, narrow edge and superfine edge) which I've found generally appropriate for my Fuji S5s. I can easily refine these presents to taste when needed..

Other programs can do similar but many are clumsy and inefficient at the task, especially Photoshop..

Sharpening for output is a totally different beast and may require a different workflow. For output sharpening Pixel Genius PhotoKit Sharpener is outstanding..

Eric..

Comment #8

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.