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setting for DSLR /SLR?
From old photo book guide line setting for SLR ..Sunny Day F11/250, Cloudy F8/125, Flash F5/60 ..does those apply to DSLR? or any guide line for DSLR setting?Also in photo editing what different between "Cut" and "Crop"?..

Comments (6)

There is nothing inherent about digital that affects the rule. Just remember that some cameras have native ISO of 200..

I don't see much point in remembering these settings. It depends greatly on the seasons, where you live, the conditions of the moment and the content of your frame. I use Aperture Priority mode when I just want a specific aperture, and Shutter Priority mode when I just want a specific shutter speed, and Manual mode when I know what I want for both. For the most part, the camera's metering system works fine..

Cropping is cutting..

Exhker wrote:.

From old photo book guide line setting for SLR ..Sunny Day F11/250,Cloudy F8/125, Flash F5/60 ..does those apply to DSLR? or any guideline for DSLR setting?Also in photo editing what different between "Cut" and "Crop"?..

Comment #1

Martin Caie wrote:[snip].

Cropping is cutting..

In general Martin's statement is true, but in some circumstances "cropping" gets rid of everything outside the selected area and "cutting" gets rid of everything inside..

However, I cannot think of a situation where you would be given both options.Chris R..

Comment #2

From old photo book guide line setting for SLR ..Sunny Day F11/250,Cloudy F8/125, Flash F5/60 ..does those apply to DSLR? or any guideline for DSLR setting?.

These settings (certainly the first two) apply to an ISO setting of 100, which is what print film used to be quite often. It also assumes that the camera doesn't have a light meter so you had to guess the exposure yourself, and this sort of rule of thumb would have been in every photographer's mind. (Happy days...)..

All modern cameras have light meters in, and even if you are using manual mode, they will tell you if you are under or over exposing or getting it right. So there is really no need to worry about this too much..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #3

For general photography use a shutter speed of 1/125 or higher and a fstop of f5.6 or smaller. with this you will ok for most photos except for special uses(like macro, etc)..

Cut, as I have seen it usually refers to computer programs like word. when you cut you eliminate the typed words. for crop, you are talking about photgraphy and you want to eliminate some unwanted parts of your picture. to crop you draw a box around the part you want to keep and hit enter the rest is gone...

Comment #4

Mike703 wrote:.

All modern cameras have light meters in, and even if you are usingmanual mode, they will tell you if you are under or over exposing orgetting it right..

You also have the histogram, which will tell you how the scene was exposed overall. And image review with zoom, so you can zoom in on whatever feature you want exposed perfectly and see if it's right for you or not. It's perfectly OK to disagree with the meter, these tools will help you know when to agree or disagree..

Seen in a fortune cookie:Fear is the darkroom where negatives are developed..

Comment #5

"Cut" is used to delete type in a Photoshop or Photoshop Elements file..

If you write words to go over top of a photo, and then decide to remove a word, you highlight it, and then use "cut" to remove it..

"Crop" refers to shopping off part of the photograph. Say the original is designed for 8x12 reproduction and you only want 8x10, You set up a box in 8x10 proportions over top of the 8x12 image, and move the box around so that the important comtent is inside it, and the unimportant content is outside. Then click on "crop" and the two extra inches, whether all on one end, all on the other end, or divided somehow between the two ends, will disappear..

The aperrture and shutter speeds work fine with digital at ISO 100, depending of course on how cloudy it is. Kodak used to include similar info in fim packages, with various settings depending on how cloudy it was. "Cloudy-bright" was a Kodak term..

EXperienced photographers look at shadows. Really black, and that's the sunlight setting. Medium is cloiudy-bright, and no shadows is cloudy, and then it gets subdivided even more..

It's called the sunny 16 rule, with the shutter speed matching the ISO/ASA, and the aperture at f16..

So, ISO 200: 1/200 of a second at f16.

ISO 400: 1/400 at f16..

And your example of 1/250 at f11 lets in the same amount of light as 1/125 at f16, which is why it works for ISO 100..

BAK.

BAK..

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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