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Replacement Filters for My Sony A200
Good day to all..

What replacement filters can you recommend other than the prescribed Sony filters? I have been looking at Amazon and found a few, there is a set that goes for only over $20.00 set of 3. I know the quality may not be as good as the original ones but has anyone tried other replacement brands?..

Comments (12)

Do you mean replacement filters or do you mean filters from an alternative source other than Sony? AFAIK the A200 isn't supplied with a filter set so I assume that you mean the latter..

Filters are not that important on DSLRs except for some specific situations. What type of filters do you think that you need? If you are not familiar with filter types, what problem do you hope to solve with filters?Chris R..

Comment #1

It'd help to post the types of filters you have in mind and the ultimate quality level you actually need (serious top quality filters tend to cost, whoever makes them)..

Its easier to give negative advice, avoid ultra cheap no name brands. As a starting point though, Hoya covers most bases pretty well.Shay son of Che.

Do androids photograph electronic sheep?..

Comment #2

Hi there Chris,.

Thank you so much for replying. I was hoping to get a polarizer for instances when I have to do outdoor shoots. I have read that it also helps in order to avoid glares when taking pictures of cars..

I was looking at Amazon and there was this one ad which provides the buyer with 3 kinds of filters; UV, Flourescent & Polarizer..

Thanks for your reply again Chris, appreciate it...

Comment #3

Thanks for the insight Shay..

Yes indeed, having to get a set with a cheap price might carry consequences with it. I was hoping to get a Polarizer, something basic for frequent outdoors..

Regards...

Comment #4

I would certainly skip cheap polarizer filters in a hurry..

First, purchase a good polarizing filter for the largest lens you have, then step-up rings for the smaller ones. That will save you over time quite a bit..

Make sure you get a very good filter. I'd suggest Heliopan or Singh-Ray. B&W or Hoya are ok as well. If you're not willing to get a good one, I'd suggest no filter until you save for one. Sticking a cheap filter on a good lens doesn't make sense..

Now, I'm not certain what lens you have there. If you have a very cheap kit lens, you could possibly get by with a little less expensive filter. I'm not sure.Cheers, Craig..

Comment #5

Timotee wrote:.

Thanks for the insight Shay..

Yes indeed, having to get a set with a cheap price might carryconsequences with it. I was hoping to get a Polarizer, somethingbasic for frequent outdoors..

Regards..

No problem. Polarizers, well definitely avoid cheapo stuff. A basic to mid range Hoya will be decently made and optically OK. A circular ploariser is needed for DSLR's as a linear polariser will have problems with the metering and autofocus..

One common mistake is to go for the maximum polarising effect every time which can look like overkill in some situations. Try rotating the filter so see how the effect varies & dont be afraid to try varying the effect.Shay son of Che.

Do androids photograph electronic sheep?..

Comment #6

Others have replied about polarizing filters so I will just make a comment on the other filters in the Amazon set (which I definitely would not buy)..

UV filters have little or no effect on digital SLRs because digital sensors are not sensitive to UV. However, some people keep a UV filter on their lens for protection - personally I prefer to use a lens hood..

Flourescent filters were used on film cameras for correcting for flourescent light. With a digital camera you do this using colour balance, so a flourescent filter isn't much use.Chris R..

Comment #7

Thanks for the advise Shay. I will surely rotate them and see how it works...

Comment #8

Guidenet wrote:.

I would certainly skip cheap polarizer filters in a hurry..

First, purchase a good polarizing filter for the largest lens youhave, then step-up rings for the smaller ones. That will save youover time quite a bit..

Make sure you get a very good filter. I'd suggest Heliopan orSingh-Ray. B&W or Hoya are ok as well. If you're not willing to get agood one, I'd suggest no filter until you save for one. Sticking acheap filter on a good lens doesn't make sense..

Now, I'm not certain what lens you have there. If you have a verycheap kit lens, you could possibly get by with a little lessexpensive filter. I'm not sure.Cheers, Craig.

Thanks for the output Craig. I was looking at some Hoya filters and am considering getting them. The lens that I have are the ones included in the kit, an 18-70mm and a 75-300mm zoom..

Like what you said, I can save for an original Sony Polarizer but if a Hoya can provide me with a similar quality, then it would be great since I would be saving at least half the amount..

Regards,Tim..

Comment #9

Chris R-UK wrote:.

Others have replied about polarizing filters so I will just make acomment on the other filters in the Amazon set (which I definitelywould not buy)..

UV filters have little or no effect on digital SLRs because digitalsensors are not sensitive to UV. However, some people keep a UVfilter on their lens for protection - personally I prefer to use alens hood..

Flourescent filters were used on film cameras for correcting forflourescent light. With a digital camera you do this using colourbalance, so a flourescent filter isn't much use.Chris R.

Thanks again Chris,.

I have disregarded the cheap ones and am considering either a Sony or a Hoya. So I guess I would be getting a UV filter for my 70mm and a Polarizer for my 300mm. So no need for a flourescent then..

Regards,Tim..

Comment #10

Personally I would get polarizing filters for both lenses and not bother with UV..

It depends on what type of photography you are doing, but I tend to use a polarizer more for landscape photography than, say, for wildlife or sports. The polarizer reduces the light reaching the sensor by 2-3 stops which is more likely to be a problem at longer focal lengths. Also, I am normally more interested in darkening the sky and reducing reflections in landscapes.Chris R..

Comment #11

Chris R-UK wrote:.

Personally I would get polarizing filters for both lenses and notbother with UV..

It depends on what type of photography you are doing, but I tend touse a polarizer more for landscape photography than, say, forwildlife or sports. The polarizer reduces the light reaching thesensor by 2-3 stops which is more likely to be a problem at longerfocal lengths. Also, I am normally more interested in darkening thesky and reducing reflections in landscapes.Chris R.

I just might do that Chris. I am always fond of landscape photography. It will also help me rid of the glare when taking pictures near a lake..

Regards,Tim..

Comment #12

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