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Removing/Mounting DSLR Lens
I apologize in advance for this very basic question..

I am wondering, is there a safe/proper way of removing/mounting a DSLR lens. Is the best way to face the camera downward and then remove the lens? Is it preferable to place the camera on it's back and remove the lens while it is vertical (perpendicular to the surface) or should the camera be placed on it's bottom (parallel to surface)? Obviously the goal is to minimize the amount of dust that enters the camera body and rear of the lens. I guess I am overly worrying about dust invading my 40D..

What is the best technique? Thanks...

Comments (33)

It doesn't make that much difference. If you are in a dusty environment, you'll probably get some dust..

That said, I change mine where and when I need to. I clean my sensor when it needs it. No big mysteries or worries.Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream.

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Comment #1

I'm not sure if there's a best way...but the way I do it (and I change lenses quite a bit) is like this. On the lens to be mounted, I loosen the rear cap and let the lens stand in the cap on a table. Take the rear cap of the mounted lens, set it on the table, and drop the lens in it once dismounted. The camera body is pointed down during the switch..

Honestly, once you clean the sensor a couple of times and get past the initial fright of it all, dust just becomes a fact of life that is no big deal. I've got 13-14K shudder act. and have brushed the sensor twice I think, and each time it took me longer to find the menu setting to lock up the mirror than it did to sweep the sensor..

Provided you don't switch the lens in the middle of a quarry or cement plant, and don't leave the body open for longer than needed...dust turns into a non-issue..

Good Luck.

Bill.

Photoman17 wrote:.

I apologize in advance for this very basic question..

I am wondering, is there a safe/proper way of removing/mounting aDSLR lens. Is the best way to face the camera downward and thenremove the lens? Is it preferable to place the camera on it's back andremove the lens while it is vertical (perpendicular to the surface)or should the camera be placed on it's bottom (parallel to surface)?Obviously the goal is to minimize the amount of dust that enters thecamera body and rear of the lens. I guess I am overly worrying aboutdust invading my 40D..

What is the best technique? Thanks...

Comment #2

I face the body down, but I really don't know whether it makes much difference..

Make sure the camera is off as I understand the image sensor is charged when on and can attract dust more readily, although this may also be incorrent. However, it's easy to turn off when changing lenses, so it won't hurt to do it..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #3

It seems to me the best way to avoid dust or other dirt/harmfull particles coming into the camera or the rear end of the lens is to detach the lens while in the horizontal and simultaneously turn the rear end of the lens and the front end of the camera down..

This will avoid any big issues caused by our friend gravity. Your environment will be preferably not very windy, dusty or crowded (which will be hard to find many times). Only the lightest particles will come into the camera if it's upside down...

Comment #4

Its easy to clean the sensor, if only with the self cleaning. the lens however can not be cleaned so easily. once dust gets in your not likely to get it out. just something to keep in mind...

Comment #5

Eduardo Dourado wrote:.

It seems to me the best way to avoid dust or other dirt/harmfullparticles coming into the camera or the rear end of the lens is todetach the lens while in the horizontal and simultaneously turn therear end of the lens and the front end of the camera down.This will avoid any big issues caused by our friend gravity. Yourenvironment will be preferably not very windy, dusty or crowded(which will be hard to find many times). Only the lightest particleswill come into the camera if it's upside down..

The above is very sensible advice - loosen in the horizontal & detach in the verticle..

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #6

PhotonFiend wrote:.

Its easy to clean the sensor, if only with the self cleaning. thelens however can not be cleaned so easily. once dust gets in yournot likely to get it out. just something to keep in mind..

A blower or brush or cloth will clean the lens just fine. Lots of "self-cleaning" sensors just move the dust around and make things worse..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #7

My Nikon D100 has topped 50,000 exposures. I don't know how many times I've changed lenses, but I change them a lot shooting stage productions, so I would guess I have changed lenses close to 5,000 times. I just grab the body in my left hand in such a way that my gig finger falls on the lens release button. I depress the button while I pop the lens off with my right hand, drop it in a vest pocket, fish the replacement lens out of it's pocket, and pop it on. I've never paid any attention to which way the lens points, it just doesn't matter. I have never turned the camera off while changing lenses or CF cards...

Comment #8

KBurns wrote:.

I have never turned the camera off while changinglenses or CF cards..

Just because you haven't shorted something out yet, doesn't mean it can't happen. Is it really so much trouble to turn the camera off while doing these things?.

Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream.

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Comment #9

KBurns wrote:.

My Nikon D100 has topped 50,000 exposures. I don't know how manytimes I've changed lenses, but I change them a lot shooting stageproductions, so I would guess I have changed lenses close to 5,000times..

You are changing lenses on average every 10 shots? Wow, your spending more time switching lenses than shooting ..

Comment #10

If I haven't shorted something by now, I don't think it's an issue...

Comment #11

Not really, after all these years I can change lenses pretty quickly. Sometimes, though I don't put the lens I just removed away in a vest pocket. If I know I am going to shoot just 4 or 5 shots before going back to the origninal lens, I just hold it in my left hand while I shoot with my right. I've thought about getting another body, but I've done okay working like this, so why spend the money?..

Comment #12

ChefZiggy wrote:.

KBurns wrote:.

I have never turned the camera off while changinglenses or CF cards..

Just because you haven't shorted something out yet, doesn't mean itcan't happen. Is it really so much trouble to turn the camera offwhile doing these things?.

All SLR/DSLR mounts are designed so that lenses can be changed without switching off. There is absolutely no risk involved, the manuals all confirm this, and the experience of decades of use backs it up..

This doesn't seem to be true of memory cards though - the advice is always to switch off while changing...

Comment #13

My K100D manual and the Fuji S3 manual both state to turn the camera off before changing ( and removing ) a lens..

Lenses have electrical components - it's a pure miracle you haven't fried either the lens or the camera..

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #14

It's a pure miracle you haven'tfried either the lens or the camera..

It's not a miracle at all. The risk just isn't as high as most want it to be...

Comment #15

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

ChefZiggy wrote:.

KBurns wrote:.

I have never turned the camera off while changinglenses or CF cards..

All SLR/DSLR mounts are designed so that lenses can be changedwithout switching off. There is absolutely no risk involved, themanuals all confirm this, and the experience of decades of use backsit up..

This doesn't seem to be true of memory cards though - the advice isalways to switch off while changing..

CF cards, like the PCMCIA cards on which the interface is based, are designed to be able to be inserted and removed with power applied. The power and ground pins are longer than the signal pins, and are designed to make contact first on insert, and last on a removal..

However, they are not designed to be removed while they are being written to, as that can lead to corrupted files and directories. Turning the camera off will help assure that all write operations are done...

Comment #16

Photoman,.

Following link showing a demonstration may be of interest to you:-.

Http://www.clarkvision.com/photoinfo/dslr.changing.lenses/.

Regards.....Caster.

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Comment #17

KBurns wrote:.

My Nikon D100 has topped 50,000 exposures. I don't know how manytimes I've changed lenses, but I change them a lot shooting stageproductions, so I would guess I have changed lenses close to 5,000times. I just grab the body in my left hand in such a way that mygig finger falls on the lens release button. I depress the buttonwhile I pop the lens off with my right hand, drop it in a vestpocket, fish the replacement lens out of it's pocket, and pop it on.I've never paid any attention to which way the lens points, it justdoesn't matter. I have never turned the camera off while changinglenses or CF cards..

KB, I assume that stage productions are in relatively low light, so you would invariably be shooting at wide apertures that don't tend to show up dust. DO you ever stop down to be able to notice whether there's any dust on your image sensor?.

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #18

DO you ever stop down to be able to notice whetherthere's any dust on your image sensor?.

I sure do. And when it needs cleaning, I clean it...

Comment #19

Hi, I bought my first digital camera a little over six months and I don't think you're being overconcerned about dust. I get dust on my sensor without changing lenses!.

Though I have read you need to point it down - could be wrong though...

Comment #20

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

All SLR/DSLR mounts are designed so that lenses can be changedwithout switching off. There is absolutely no risk involved, themanuals all confirm this, and the experience of decades of use backsit up..

Not true of Nikon..

From Thom Hogan's review of the Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 VR.

"Turn the camera off..

Nikon's been telling us to turn the camera off before changing lenses, and it's never been more true. If VR is active when you remove the lens from the camera, weird things can and do happen.":.

Http://www.bythom.com/70200VRlens.htm.

From my D80 manual p. 11"Attaching a Lens.

1 Turn the camera off .2.Remove the rear cap ... etc.....Detaching Lenses.

Be sure the camera is off when removing or exchanging lenses. To remove the lens, press and hold the lens-release button ... etc".

I do change lenses having failed to switch off it by accident and have not had problems to date but you had better check your insurance policies before giving out advice like that!.

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #21

Chris Elliott wrote:.

... check your insurancepolicies before giving out advice like that!.

Well, if you're right then perhaps it's yet another consequence of Nikon's Heath Robinson AF lens mount. But nobody in their right mind would design a lens mount that relied for it's well-being on the camera being switched off before detaching a lens. If it really was so important it would be trivial to design a switch into the release button..

Just for the record, I did check my Canon manual and it doesn't suggest switching off to change lenses...

Comment #22

It is a miracle. The Pope should be contacting you. .

Seriously I'm in IT and changing a CF card on a live circuit ( i.e. without turning off the camera ) is the main reason people post to this forum about corrupted or lost images on cards, and cards that don't work any more. For anyone reading this please NEVER remove you memory cards without turning off the camera first. Make sure you check it is not writing data after you press power off, because a camera can do that and usually signals it by flashing an LED or keeping the LCD active for a while..

Lenses are complex electrical and mechanical devices with computers on board. They are not dead pieces of glass and metal like old manual focus lenses. They are an expensive investment and it is again a pointless risk to run changing lenses without turning off a camera..

Is this trivial step really so great a burden to ensure the safety of your equipment and data ? .

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #23

I've owned a D50 for about one year. I have changed lenses quite a bit - outdoors, indoors, & everywhere else. Usually I just make sure the camera body is pointed down. I also loosen the cap on the lens that's going on the camera so I can use one hand to hold the body and one to mess with the lenses..

I have never needed to touch the D50 filter/sensor. I have a bulb blower that I have used a few times every now and then. I use it on the front and back of lenses, too. Other than that, nada..

I really wouldn't over think it. Just use common sense and you'll be fine..

WH..

Comment #24

I doubt very seriously that my having had no problems changing lenses & CF cards with the camera turned on is based on pure luck. I've done it way too many times for luck to have been the deciding factor. The only thing I do to avoid problems with CF card is to make sure the green indicator light right beside the door to the card chamber isn't lit up when I depress the ejection button. Those who do have problems probably eject the card while it is being written to. I don't have any lenses with VR, so that might be a factor...

Comment #25

PhotonFiend wrote:.

Its easy to clean the sensor, if only with the self cleaning. thelens however can not be cleaned so easily. once dust gets in yournot likely to get it out. just something to keep in mind..

I agree. I did clean the sensor with rocket blower but never any lens. I am more worried to have dust in the lens..

Rafy Sugirihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/rafysugiri/sets/http://bighugelabs.com/flickr/dna.php?username=79015415@N00..

Comment #26

Dad_of_four wrote:.

KBurns wrote:.

My Nikon D100 has topped 50,000 exposures. I don't know how manytimes I've changed lenses, but I change them a lot shooting stageproductions, so I would guess I have changed lenses close to 5,000times..

You are changing lenses on average every 10 shots? Wow, yourspending more time switching lenses than shooting .

Wow! As a newbie to DSLR's that last comment really gives me pause. I'm a new D40 owner with a popular trio of basic lenses. Once the weather breaks and I were going to the zoo, for example, I would expect to use the:.

55-200 mm VR as default and where modest telephoto is required.

18-55 mm kit lens probably mostly for the wide angle end (my Canon SD800IS has really made me appreciate that).

Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8D prime for low light no flash and where significant bokeh seems important.

I'm expecting that each of these situations is likely to come up as often as any other and I would expect to be changing lenses as frequently as every 3 or 4 photo opportunities (assuming multiple exposures for each) so I'm expecting to be changing lenses REALLY often almost certainly more than every 10 shots. Is this unusual? Is this a problem? Isn't this why I bought the DSLR and the lenses in the first place? Am I going to need to be conservative about changing lenses so I'm not fretting about dust all the time?.

Comments for a beginner? Thanks..

Mike..

Comment #27

Am I going to need to be conservative about.

Changing lenses so I'm not fretting about dust all the time?.

Comments for a beginner? Thanks..

Mike.

Mike,.

Short answer is no..

As I've posted elsewhere, I change lenses a fair amount. When I do, I try to do it a way where I'm not begging dust to come in the body or the rear of the lens. Really common sense stuff..

Dust is a fact of life and the reason folks get tight about it is they are afraid of cleaning the sensor. That fear is based on two things. 1. Camera stores get 50-75 bucks for what takes a couple of minutes to do and they really push the idea that it has to be done by a professional. 2. The horror stories that people post of how they ruined their camera doing it.



I use a gizmo from Copperhill Images called Sensor Sweep. It's a little pricey...it comes with a pencil brush and a little blower and some other stuff if you buy the kit...how it works is you take the brush out and blow air through the bristles and get a charge on it. Gently swipe the brush over the sensor and the dust gets "pulled" off the sensor. It takes all of about 10 seconds. This way the dust comes out of the body as opposed to finding a new place to reside in the body using a rocket blower. For "dry" dust (meaning it's not crud that has welded itself on the sensor) which is what most of deal with, it works great.

That takes a few minutes longer. To put this all into perspective, my D80 has around 14K actuation's, I change lenses two or three times eveytime I use it. I've had to sweep the sensor twice and wet clean it once in the last 18 months..

Bill..

Comment #28

Bill,.

Thanks. That's very helpful and reassuring and it seems sensible..

Over and above the dust issues, I am still a little curious about how often most serious amateur photographers will change lenses in a reasonably dynamic situation such as a zoo. I can see if you're in an extended portrait, or macro, or landscape setting, you would not be changing lenses much..

However, it seems to me that each of my three little beginner lenses satisfies a very specific requirement that can't really be met by the other (wide angle/telescopic/low light, etc) so I'm looking at a probable lens change at every new photo opportunity, often with a lens change to cover the same opportunity perhaps from a different angle..

Which is fine, I love the flexibility it gives me over my old P&S's, but this frequent lens changing doesn't seem to be in the mainstream from what I read on this and other fora. After all, the fellow who changed lenses every 10 shots seems to have caught a bit of flak..

Mike..

Comment #29

Mike__ wrote:.

Bill,.

Thanks. That's very helpful and reassuring and it seems sensible..

Over and above the dust issues, I am still a little curious about howoften most serious amateur photographers will change lenses in areasonably dynamic situation such as a zoo. I can see if you're inan extended portrait, or macro, or landscape setting, you would notbe changing lenses much..

After a while I think you get a sense of what to bring for what you're going to do that day. That's usually developed by kicking yourself a number of times by not bringing the right one...lol. For light and cheap an 18-55 and a 70-300VR will get you by about anytime of the day. For indoor sports...a little more money...I usually have a 80-200AF-D/2.8 (poor mans 70-200VR) mounted with a 35-70/2.8 in my pocket. For family get togethers...35-70/2.8, 105/2.8VR, and the trusty old 50/1.8...and the SB-800. I just picked up a 300/4 and use it with a 1.4 TC, that'll be the primary "out in the woods" lens.

But I have to remind myself that this is a hobby...still cheaper than Harleys and boats tho!!.

Getting back to the point...I usually have one mounted and another in my pocket and that's about it..

However, it seems to me that each of my three little beginner lensessatisfies a very specific requirement that can't really be met by theother (wide angle/telescopic/low light, etc) so I'm looking at aprobable lens change at every new photo opportunity, often with alens change to cover the same opportunity perhaps from a different.

I think that's also called lens lust...welcome to the party .

Angle..

Good luck Mike,.

Bill..

Comment #30

KBurns wrote:.

DO you ever stop down to be able to notice whetherthere's any dust on your image sensor?.

I sure do. And when it needs cleaning, I clean it..

OK, now it makes sense. I thought your first post implied that the technique for changing lenses doesn't matter if you want to minimise dust in your camera. The OP was asking about how to minimise dust. Your answer didn't address that issue after all..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #31

Worrying about which way the camera needs to be oriented when changing lenses in order to minimize dust is nothing more than an obsession. Just change the darn lens and shoot photos. When the sensor needs to be blown off or cleaned, do so...

Comment #32

KBurns wrote:.

Problems probably eject the card while it is being written to. Idon't have any lenses with VR, so that might be a factor..

VR is only active when the shutter button is half or fully depressed, so that's not a factor. I've had a lock-up when I didn't turn the camera off once on my D2x changing lenses (which I don't do all that often anyway,) since then, I've decided that the risk, no matter if it's due to water, sweat, or whatever else simply isn't worth-while..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #33

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