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Real beginners question!!!
Hi guys!!.

I am looking to upgrade from a P&S to DSLR... I am still majorly a novice (as you will soon realise) at this and have just been taking happy snaps on my P&S for a while now. I know you get heaps of questions asking about which model to get but this time I am going even more basic!!.

Through reading these forums I have realised that the lens is just as, if not more, important than the camera so....

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow? 18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be a good general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots (landscape, portraits, action etc)..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

I know I have a lot more research to do, but this would be a great jumping off point!!.

Thanks,Megsy!..

Comments (24)

Megsy wrote:.

Hi guys!!.

I am looking to upgrade from a P&S to DSLR... I am still majorly anovice (as you will soon realise) at this and have just been takinghappy snaps on my P&S for a while now. I know you get heaps ofquestions asking about which model to get but this time I am goingeven more basic!!.

Through reading these forums I have realised that the lens is justas, if not more, important than the camera so....

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

They designate the focal length.http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Optical/Focal_Length_01.htm.

Specifically, all DSLRs operate using 35mm-style lenses and focal lengths, even if their sensor is smaller than a 35mm chunk of film. For that, the focal length multiplier comes into play..

Http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/key=focal+length+multiplier.

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

IS = image stabilizer. Its an anti-shake system to help reduce blur in lower light pictures. It doesn't help with moving subjects of course, only the moving camera..

USM = ultrasonic motor - a nearly silent fast focusing motor found in more expensive lenses..

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be agood general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots(landscape, portraits, action etc)..

The kit lens that comes with the camera. Its going to inhabit the somewhat wide -> slightly telephoto area and be the most useful overall..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

No. Lenses all have specific mounts. Canon has the EF mount (with various companies making lenses for it). Nikon has the F mount. Sony has the minolta mount..

In very limited circumstances you can mount a lens to another type of camera, but you lose all automatic features (autofocus, aperture control, etc). Don't depend or expect it, unless you have a collection of very old expensive lenses ..

I know I have a lot more research to do, but this would be a greatjumping off point!!.

Thanks,Megsy!..

Comment #1

Megsy wrote:.

Hi guys!!.

I am looking to upgrade from a P&S to DSLR... I am still majorly anovice (as you will soon realise) at this and have just been takinghappy snaps on my P&S for a while now. I know you get heaps ofquestions asking about which model to get but this time I am goingeven more basic!!.

Through reading these forums I have realised that the lens is justas, if not more, important than the camera so....

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

These are the focal length ranges of the lens, expressed as millimetres. This method is much more precise and explanatory than 2x, 3x, 6x, etc. which 'x' factors are merely relative short-to-long, and don't say HOW short or HOW long..

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

I'm guessing you mean I-mage S-stabilisation and U-ltra S-onic M-otor..

Image stabilisation counters camera shake at longer shutter speeds. It is very worthwhile, and extends the shooting capabilities of longer (tele) lenses in low light, and also makes a tripod somewhat less necessary..

Ultra Sonic Motors are used in some lenses to provide particularly quiet and rapid auto focusing. Nice to have, but not essential... [as is Auto Focusing generally, of course.].

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be agood general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots(landscape, portraits, action etc)..

A good walk-around lens on an APS sized sensor will have a minimum f-length of about 18mm, and a long end of around 100mm (slightly less, or slightly more at the long end, is your choice). It is my opinion that anything with a greater range [short/long] than this, will either be too heavy to carry around for very long, or low in performance (restricted maximum aperture), or high in price..

Hint: The kit lens sold with the camera is usually a pretty good first lens for a novice. Its performance is usually adequate, whilst it's price is pretty low...(well, compared with the ultimate best lenses that might eventually replace it in your kit, that is.).

Note: Remember, the whole point of getting a dSLR instead of a super zoom digicam of some sort, is to interchange the lens for the most suitable one for the subject .... NOT to stick with one do-it-all lens that doesn't do anything particularly well..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

Although there are some notable exceptions, lenses are not interchangeable between camera marques..... so, once you have settled on a camera body, you have also settled on the range of lenses available to fit on it.... whether they come from the camera maker, or alternate makes like Tamron and Sigma..

The most notable exception is the 4/3 system, where lenses are interchangeable between all 4/3 models, regardless of which make of body....

Thanks,Megsy.

I hope this helps with some of the basics... Regards,Baz..

Comment #2

Megsy wrote:.

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

When you compare different brands, in the digital world, be aware of comparing apples to apples. Several models use a multiplier of 1.5x, 1.6x and 2.x.

In order to compare across models, you need to know what crop factor multiplier that brand has. After calculating, we want to have a common base of Equivalent Focal Length to a 35mm Full Frame film camera..

This demo below is for a crop factor of 2xhttp://www.harlos-mfg.de/e-1/brennw/brennw.htm.

The other thing that makes a lens big and heavy vs small and light is the light gathering feature of the lens. This is called the f/stop. An f/4 lens would be light,smaller, cheaper. An f/2 lens would be heavier, bigger and more expensive..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

Nope..

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Comment #3

HI Megsy,.

Question #1 - Those numbers represent the maximum aperture for that lens (1.4, 2.8,4.0 etc.).

Question #2 - Your correct on the IS and USM. Image Stabilizing is very useful when shooting in low light without a tripod especially with longer focal length lenses. Do you absolutely need it? No. Before the creation of such things as IS many great photographs have been taken simply with the use of a tripod. Personally I think IS is worth the extra $. The USM is Canon's electronic metering and focusing method, This to me was a huge step forward in photography..

Question #3.1 - Landscapes; require a wide focal length lens, 16mm,24mm,etc. Portraits; are best shot with medium telephoto lenses, 85mm,135mm. Action; Indoor sports would require a fast lens of med. to long focal length, 200mm to 300mm F2.8 Outdoor sports would be about the same except you might get away with a little slower lens such as an F4 and perhaps a bit more reach,400mm or so..

Question # 3.1 - All interchangeable lenses are designed to work with specific camera brands and or bodies.I hope this helps. Don.

'Longshot'..

Comment #4

Just want to add that you are correct in your assumption that the lens is just as important. Actually it more important! The camera just records what comes thru the lens..

Most beginners start out as you say with a general wide range lens. As you photography skills improve you start to branch out and look to up grade your lenses. There is a world of difference in entry level lenses and Canon L class lenses or their counter parts with Tamron or Sigma..

Here is something I want you to think about and actually do a little research to prove my point. Go on Ebay or Craigs list and look at prices of 3 year old DSLR cameras. You will find that they sell for about 1/3 of their price new. Now look at lenses. Great quality lenses keep their value because lot of people don't sell good lenses. A lens can be for life if properly taken care of..

So when you can invest in great glass because it will reward you with great images...

Comment #5

Also, be careful about buying lenses by their numbers. A major manufacturer may sell an 18-105 f/5.6 for one amount while Brand X sells a more impressive sounding 18-300 f/4 for a little less (the infamous Brand X sells lenses designed to fit on cameras by several manufacturer's). But on closer observation the quality of Brand X may be worse than that of a point and shoot and depending on your personal tastes, may not be suitable. Also, all lenses from a particular manufacturer do not provide the same quality of image across their whole product range..

One advantage of dSLR is being able to change lenses. To the contrary is the advantage to pick a lens that suits you and stick with it. Another advantage is being able to use a quality of lens you would not otherwise be able to use...

Comment #6

When it comes time that you do wish to upgrade to quality glass then do some research and ask questions on this site. You will get many answers and you have to sort thru them and decide which ones are valid and which ones are just an inexperienced person that likes what he has not really knowing what quality glass really is or how it affects the photo..

A good example is most kit lenses. They will produce good results in certain conditions where quality glass will come thru in almost all situations if the photographer knows what he is doing..

The wider the zoom range the slimmer the chances are of you getting quality lens that will perform great across it's entire zoom range. Hands down, primes are the best..

Friscovoyager wrote:.

Also, be careful about buying lenses by their numbers. A majormanufacturer may sell an 18-105 f/5.6 for one amount while Brand Xsells a more impressive sounding 18-300 f/4 for a little less (theinfamous Brand X sells lenses designed to fit on cameras by severalmanufacturer's). But on closer observation the quality of Brand Xmay be worse than that of a point and shoot and depending on yourpersonal tastes, may not be suitable. Also, all lenses from aparticular manufacturer do not provide the same quality of imageacross their whole product range..

One advantage of dSLR is being able to change lenses. To thecontrary is the advantage to pick a lens that suits you and stickwith it. Another advantage is being able to use a quality of lensyou would not otherwise be able to use...

Comment #7

Hi,.

Just a point, you ask "I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be a good general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots (landscape, portraits, action etc)." and I can give you an answer to that..

Years of experience and an empty wallet suggests that something starting about 28 to 35 mm (in 35mm film terms) is great for landscapes. And about 85 to 90mm is great for portraits. Go beyond 90 or so and you don't seem to gain much until you reach the 200mm point. In your shoes I'd go for the best I could afford in the 30 - 90's zoom range and then add to it as your experience grows..

Kit lenses are generally good but you might find that some punch over their weight (I am thinking of Olympus) and others are designed to be, well, um, a cheap first lens (that is soon abandoned). You ought to be looking at the various forums to see which ones most people upgrade from..

And beware of lens that have a great reputation based on lenses no one can afford. The dearest I've seen so far was 60,000 and might be impressive. Better to look at a good lens and body you can afford then add in the cost of the next lens or two. Also allow for the fact that the better lenses Are not a jack of all trades. So a superb 30 t0 90mm zoom may not be able to do macro work and another lens will be needed for that. But the other lens may be superb as a macro but nothing else (again the "FourThirds" range includes the exception but Baz has already alerted you to them)..

It also makes sense to look at _and_ handle the camera body. I own a very pleasant camera with a great lens on it but you have to pick it up carefully and make sure your thumb doesn't touch a button that's just in the right place to screw things up at the worst possible moment. And I own a very elderly camera that is great for action pictures as the layout means I can grab it and fire away without it jumping into some obscure menu/setting..

I hope this is of some help..

Regards, David..

Comment #8

Megsy wrote:.

Hi guys!!.

I am looking to upgrade from a P&S to DSLR... I am still majorly anovice (as you will soon realise) at this and have just been takinghappy snaps on my P&S for a while now. I know you get heaps ofquestions asking about which model to get but this time I am goingeven more basic!!.

Through reading these forums I have realised that the lens is justas, if not more, important than the camera so....

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

Focal lengths for zoom lenses in millimetres. The small number is the widest angle of view and the larger number is the narrowest angle of view. For most DSLRs, 18(mm) is reasonably wide for most people and 55(mm) a modest telephoto good for portraits..

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

IS = Image Stabilization. Some DSLR systems have it in the camera body and some include it with some lenses. The advantage of having it in-body is that it can be used with ALL lenses and reduces the cost because the mechanism doesn't need to be duplicated for each lens. The advantage of having IS in lenses is that it can be optimised for a particular lens and is generally better at stabilizing the image. USM = Ultra Sonic Motor. This is used for automatically focussing the lens.

Ring motors are generally better than USM but not much. When you buy a lens, you don't get a choice of which auto focus type you get. Do you want it? Probably!.

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be agood general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots(landscape, portraits, action etc)..

Get the "kit lens". This is the lens that usually comes with the camera and is usually very good, excellent value, covers a useful range of focal lengths and can be upgraded to a better/faster zoom or prime lens later (don't worry about this now).

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

No. These lenses will usually only fit one brand of camera. You can buy lenses from an independent manufacturer but again these will be made to fit your brand of camera and no other. This is why it is important to choose the camera with care because you will be largely "locking in" to a system of lenses and accessories from that manufacturer..

I know I have a lot more research to do, but this would be a greatjumping off point!!.

I hope I have helped. If you have any more questions - fire away!.

Thanks,Megsy!..

Comment #9

I have one bit of advice for you that really helped me when I started..

Don't get the kit lens. As in, when you buy your camera choose the "Body Only" option. The lens that comes with the camera is generally not worth the extra money..

For around $80, you can get a 50mm f/1.8 (for both canon and nikon). This lens is very sharp focusing, and fast (denoted by the 1.8, meaning you can take good shots in low light)..

The good thing about the 50mm 1.8 is that as your skill increases, you will always have a use for it. It's very inexpensive, so if you make some mistakes and it breaks, your only out $80. And while a lot of people will tell you that you want some sort of a zoom, truthfully the best zoom in your two legs. Rarely is there an instance where you can't just get closer, or take a step back..

The 50mm f/1.8 is a great starter lens that will help you learn what you want in your future lenses. Good luck..

Greg IndaI intend to live forever, or die trying.-Groucho Marx..

Comment #10

A 28-135mm zoom lens is a great all around lens. If you buy a Canon DSLR, the Canon version of the 28-135mm is very good quality, a good place to start...

Comment #11

Avoid the kit lens..

The Canon and Nikon 50mm f/1.8 are cheap and very good, as GInda says..

GInda wrote:.

I have one bit of advice for you that really helped me when I started..

Don't get the kit lens. As in, when you buy your camera choose the"Body Only" option. The lens that comes with the camera is generallynot worth the extra money..

For around $80, you can get a 50mm f/1.8 (for both canon and nikon).This lens is very sharp focusing, and fast (denoted by the 1.8,meaning you can take good shots in low light)..

The good thing about the 50mm 1.8 is that as your skill increases,you will always have a use for it. It's very inexpensive, so if youmake some mistakes and it breaks, your only out $80. And while a lotof people will tell you that you want some sort of a zoom, truthfullythe best zoom in your two legs. Rarely is there an instance whereyou can't just get closer, or take a step back..

The 50mm f/1.8 is a great starter lens that will help you learn whatyou want in your future lenses. Good luck..

Greg IndaI intend to live forever, or die trying.-Groucho Marx..

Comment #12

Andy Simmons wrote:.

Avoid the kit lens..

The Canon and Nikon 50mm f/1.8 are cheap and very good, as GInda says..

Yes. Very good lenses. But in addition to the kit lens....NOT instead of !!.

(Dear me!)Regards,Baz..

Comment #13

Barrie, we may just have to agree to disagree. I would skip the kit lens. Purchase the body only. If you are short of funds, buy the 50mm f/1.8. If you have a little extra cash, I would buy the 28-135mm zoom instead of the 50mm, or in addition to it..

Barrie Davis wrote:.

Andy Simmons wrote:.

Avoid the kit lens..

The Canon and Nikon 50mm f/1.8 are cheap and very good, as GInda says..

Yes. Very good lenses. But in addition to the kit lens....NOT insteadof !!.

(Dear me!)Regards,Baz..

Comment #14

Hi Megsy,.

You have asked some very good questions. Any answers will only scratch the surface, so consider this information a very, very basic starting point..

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

Those numbers are focal length (in mm). I'm sure that doesn't mean much too you. But, those numbers will tell you two (related) things. The field of view (how much of the scene they take in) and the magnification. The field of view concept comes in handy when thinking about wide angles (smaller number), while magnification helps when considering telephoto lens (larger numbers, like a telescope). On the type of SLR you are going to buy, the "standard" which means the magnification will be about what you "see" with your own eyes is 35mm.



Makes sense? Maybe a little. But, if you go to your local photoshop and put on different lens, the differences will become more clear..

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

IS = Canon's Image Stabilization (Nikon calls it VR). It's a good feature, as it helps prevent blurry photos causes by hand shake when holding the camera. However, it does not do anything to freeze movement by the subject...only a fast shutter speed can help you with that (except for panning, but we're getting ahead of ourselves)..

USM = Canon's Ultra-Sonic Motor (Nikon calls it AF-S). This means the lens focusing motor is in the lens, rather than in the camera. This allows the lens to focus more quietly and more quickly. Good things, but not necessary, depending on what you're doing..

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be agood general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots(landscape, portraits, action etc)..

Keep in mind that when you get a general purpose lens, you're going to be making compromises. So, you eventually will be dissatisfied with the lens when you have a particular purpose. That's okay! The general purpose lens is a good way to get going and help you determine which is the next lens you need..

Nikon has an inexpensive 18-70 lens that works great, and is inexpensive on the used market. I'm not a Canon guy, but I'd guess they have something similar..

Note that I picked 18-70. As I said above, consider 35 to be mid-point. The 18 is half of 35 and 70 is double 35so you have a lens that give you twice the width of view (18) of a standard 35, and twice the magnification (70) of a standard 35..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

For the most part, all Nikon lenses will work on all Nikon cameras, and all Canon lenses will work on all Canon cameras. This is certainly true for the lenses you're likely to be considering initially. However, Nikon lenses will not fit on Canon cameras, and vice versa...

Comment #15

Andy Simmons wrote:.

Barrie, we may just have to agree to disagree. I would skip the kitlens. Purchase the body only. If you are short of funds, buy the50mm f/1.8. If you have a little extra cash, I would buy the28-135mm zoom instead of the 50mm, or in addition to it..

Well, it isn't just me that you are disagreeing with, is it? There is some consistency in opinions being stacked as they are....

Many of us feel the kit lens is a 'best' first lens.... especially if there is restricted cash available. The latest one from Canon is not bad optically, the Nikon version has always been pretty tolerable for quality, and the Olympus ones are very good, apparently..

It seems the manufacturers have got wise, and are now taking more pains to ensure the first shooting experience had with their cameras is not disappointing..

As a SOLE lens the 85mm (equiv) that you advocate is too limited in angle to be much use for general shooting. It is sharp (yes) and cheap -(yes, if bought used)- but it's narrowness and lack of flexibility is a big problem for anyone finding their feet with a new interest in documenting what they do in visual form. That you found the restrictions made your creative juices flow is beside the point, and is no indication that it would work for anybody else's temperament.... Indeed, that there is more than one of you wants to restrict the new photographer so much is surprising to me, I have to admit..

Get a better zoom than the kit lens by all means, if the money is there, but let's hope the OP waits 'till he already has those multi-focal length options before he chooses any fixed f-length lens.... and be even more sure when it duplicates a focal length he's already got..

Furthermore, if obliged to buy just a single f-length rather than a zoom, I would choose a much wider lens (say, 28mm equiv) as being more *creatively* useful than ever one so narrow as the 85mm (equiv). This choice concurs with Sigma's decision with their fixed f-length DP1, of course......

..... but then, the more experienced photographers become, the shorter/wider the f-lengths they tend to select for their shooting....

Final note: It has been observed that very often the standard 50mm, as supplied with so many SLRs from the past, was 50mm only in name. A good many of them were rather longer.... 52, 54, even 56mm was not unknown in lenses engraved all "50mm". The reasons for the discrepancy are to do with the logistics of producing wide aperture lenses..

What this means, of course, is that the nominally 80 or 85mm lens (equivalences on cropped cameras) COULD be nearer an effective 90mm in actual acceptance angle.... and therefore even less suitable for general shooting.Regards,Baz..

Comment #16

Hi,.

I have to agree with Baz and have to point out that not all kit lenses are the same for the very obvious reason that they are all made by different firms and different companies have different policies. So some are designed to let you play with the camera the day you open the box and take it out but then - after a while - you'll notice the restrictions and buy another, which pushes up the price of the camera etc (and their profits). Like those silly little media cards you get in the box....

So have a look in the forums for the camera you're thinking about and then do a search on "kit" - you might get an unpleasant surprise..

Firms I've experience of are Panasonic, Leica and Olympus and, (not only in my opinion but in the opinion of thousands of happy owners), they turn out good quality lenses at all levels and many people are very happy with their kit lens..

But don't just take my word for it, have a search around and see what people say..

Regards, David..

Comment #17

Megsy wrote:.

1) When talking about lenses what are the numbers that follow?18-135, 1855, 28-135, 75-300.

Those are focal lenghths. Basically, the smaller numbers, the more of a scene your camera sees, the bigger the number, the less and consequently the closer you feel to the subject. Also of not is aperture. For lenses like those, it would be something like 3.5-5.6 or 3.5-6.3 or 4.5-5.6. Here, the bigger the number the less light a lens takes in..

2) Also what is this IS and USM??? And o I want it?? .

IS is image stabilization from canon (and vr for vibration reduction from nikon). It cuts down to a degree on camera shake in certain situations. It doesn't hurt to have, but you can probably live without it. USM if for ultrasonic focusing motors in some canon lenses. These focus faster than traditional screw drive lenses (typically). AF-S is the nikon equivalent.

Again, nice where you can get it, but not a deal breaker..

3.1) I am prob only going to get one lens for now, what would be agood general purpose one? I am going to be doing an array of shots(landscape, portraits, action etc)..

For one lens, you want 18- something. With nikon the 18-135 is a decent lens, and can be had for about 200 bucks bundled with some of the bodies. The 18-55 would be fine for landscape and people, but kind of short for sports. The 75-300would be good for sports/wildlife, but lousy for landscapes..

3.1) would these lens' go on any camera or a particular model??.

It would help to know what you are looking at. You can't cross brands with lenses (no canon lens on a nikon) but lenses are largely compatible within brands, but not entirely. For example, the nikon D40 only autofocuses with some lenses, not all.

I know I have a lot more research to do, but this would be a greatjumping off point!!.

Thanks,Megsy!.

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Comment #18

I have to at least partially disagree here..

Where I agree is that the 50 1.8 is a great lens for a great price. FOr around 100 bucks, you get image quality comparable to lenses costing 1000 bucks..

Where I strongly disagree is using this as your only lens on digital. It is simply not versatile enough for what most people want. Too wide for sports, too narrow for landscapes, to narrow for group of people indoors. It is a killer portrait lens, but kind of frustrating to have as your only lens. Yes, it walks all over the kit lenses for the price in terms of image quality, but convenience is worth something too. If I were going to throw one prime on a digital, it would probably be a 30 or 35 (easier for me to deal with too wide than too narrow) but these are much more expensive...

Comment #19

As a SOLE lens the 85mm (equiv) that you advocate is too limited inangle to be much use for general shooting. It is sharp (yes) andcheap -(yes, if bought used)- but it's narrowness and lack offlexibility is a big problem for anyone finding their feet with a newinterest in documenting what they do in visual form. That you foundthe restrictions made your creative juices flow is beside the point,and is no indication that it would work for anybody else'stemperament.... Indeed, that there is more than one of you wants torestrict the new photographer so much is surprising to me, I have toadmit..

I disagree that it is too narrow and inflexible. As far as learning photography, one of the more important lessons is to move your feet. Position yourself for great shots. It's very easy with a zoom to stand in one place and zoom out to the max or zoom in to the max..

At $80 it's in my opinion the best FIRST lens. It will give you the best sense of what you want next. If you find yourself unable to get close up shots of the baseball game, then you'll want a longer lens. If you find yourself constantly backing up wanting a wider angle, then you'll want a wide angle..

You also get a sense of what a f/1.8 is. You'll have that big aperture to play with and learn how big you need. You can get those low light evening kitchen shots your bound to take..

All this and it's a sharp lens. What more could you want in your FIRST lens?.

I'm not advocating that this is the end all be all of lenses. But I will advocate that it is an excellent trainer lens that will help you grow..

Greg Inda.

I intend to live forever, or die trying.-Groucho Marx..

Comment #20

GInda wrote:.

All this and it's a sharp lens. What more could you want in yourFIRST lens?.

A wider angle. That's what!Regards,Baz..

Comment #21

Barrie Davis wrote:.

GInda wrote:.

All this and it's a sharp lens. What more could you want in yourFIRST lens?.

A wider angle. That's what!Regards,Baz.

Since I'm a Canon guy I only looked up Canon lenses, but lets see what compares price wise to the $80 50mm f/1.8 and is a wider focal length....

35mm f/2 $24528mm f/2.8 $18024mm f/2.8 $310.

Slower and at least $100 more.I'll stand by my 50mm thank you very much..

Greg Inda.

I intend to live forever, or die trying.-Groucho Marx..

Comment #22

I agree. It shouldn't be your only lens. However, I'm saying it makes a great FIRST lens. As you learn how your camera works you'll see what your limitations are and learn what is most important to you photographically. If you want shots of baseball players, your next lens should probably be longer. If you find yourself backing up a lot, you need a wide angle..

It's a fast lens that will allow you to take very good pictures in low light. It's INCREDIBLY affordable, meaning that if you break it while learning how a lens attaches and detaches, your only out $80. It's very sharp, so if your photos are blurry, it's probably your fault not the lens..

I would rather point someone to this lens and have them quickly outgrow it, then get a crappy kit lens. The fact is I still find uses for this lens and always keep it in my bag. Why not get a lens that you'll always have a use for?.

Greg IndaI intend to live forever, or die trying.-Groucho Marx..

Comment #23

You know you want a wider angle because you are an experienced user. The OP is not. Using a 50mm could teach the OP what you have learned. Maybe not. Maybe the OP will want a longer reach..

Barrie Davis wrote:.

GInda wrote:.

All this and it's a sharp lens. What more could you want in yourFIRST lens?.

A wider angle. That's what!Regards,Baz..

Comment #24

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