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RAW and .jpg
I will be taking stage photos for a first time. Until now, I have only taken photos in *.jpg format, including some simple manipuation/editing of photos in Photoshop, but saving the files as *.jpg files. The advice I've picked up about taking stage photos is to use the RAW format. I'm then assuming that, after uploading the RAW files into Photoshop, I can then save them as RAW files or as *.jpg files. Am I correct? Tom..

Comments (9)

P001 wrote:.

I will be taking stage photos for a first time. Until now, I haveonly taken photos in *.jpg format, including some simplemanipuation/editing of photos in Photoshop, but saving the files as*.jpg files. The advice I've picked up about taking stage photos isto use the RAW format. I'm then assuming that, after uploading theRAW files into Photoshop, I can then save them as RAW files or as*.jpg files. Am I correct? Tom.

The raw files on your disk should remain there as raw files..

When you open them in photoshop they are developed into a file format that is displayable on your monitor. When you save it, save it as jpeg format. At that time place those jpeg files either in a different directory from the raw files or give them a different name so that you don't overwrite the raw files. Those raw files are your negatives and you may want to go back and develop them differently on another day..

Clear as mud?A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #1

If you plan to do several rounds of editing then save them in an non-lossy format such as tiff or dng. resaving a jpg file several times causes a reduction in image quality. If your camera allows for it, I suggest taking photos in JPG+RAW. The JPG will have all the in-camera, adjustments applied, sharpening, white balance etc. The RAW will not...

Comment #2

[Recurring rant...].

You will often learn more by trying than by asking..

You have a camera.You have a computer.You have the software.Go take some pictures and try out some variations..

Waiting until the event to try a new shooting technique is just a recipe for disaster. You will likely lose some great shots by trying unfamiliar things and paying attention to the camera instead of the subject. Be familiar with the techniques beforehand..

[End of Rant.].

In this case, mimic the shooting conditions of performers on stage by reducing the light in your living room, using a table lamp to light a small subject in the middle of the room. If you can hang a toy from a string under the lamp, you can even get a sense of what motion will do to your photographs. Shoot some RAW. Shoot some JPEG. Shoot with a few different settings that you want to explore. Go back to the computer, and study your results..

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #3

Actually, makes good sense to me. I had heard RAW files compared to "negatives." Thanks..

Comment #4

And my camera does permit that, RAW and JPG. Good suggestion. Thanks. Tom..

Comment #5

Rant fair enough! My camera permits both RAW and JPG files of same photo. Thanks. Tom..

Comment #6

Shooting raw + jpeg is fine if you will not be doing much editing. But the real purpose of shooting raw is so that you can have more leeway in recovering details in tough lighting situations and to get the best quality possible after editing your pictures, and then creating a jpeg that contains your raw edits so that it looks great..

Thinking of your raw files as negatives is fine, but if you're just going to store them away with out editing them, and instead keep your out of camera jpegs and work on those, then you've achieved nothing to improve the quality of the final images by shooting raw..

Depending on what software you use to edit your raw images, it may or may not recognize and apply your in-camera settings. I shoot raw only, not raw + jpeg (but that's just me) because I use software that is able to read my camera settings exactly - so I can produce the jpegs direct from the raw files exactly as if my camera would have produced those jpegs, if not better..

If you use a photoshop product, you will be using ACR (Adobe Camera Raw), Adobe's raw editing engine, which is good, but will not apply your in-camera settings to the raw files, and it will not save back to your raw files with the changes made, but you can save the newly edited images as tiff or jpegs. And your raw files remain intact, which is good..

Nikon Capture NX, the software I use for my Nikon camera, is able to save the edit steps I made to the raw image back to the raw file, and it allows me, at a later time, to re-open that same raw file, and add more steps or remove the steps I applied the first time to that raw image. So, it keeps my original raw file intact, but also keeps any edits I did, and allows me to further edit the raw image at any time without losing the original data or quality. After I'm done editing my raw files, I batch process to create new jpegs from the raw files containing the edits I made in raw. If I want to further enhance the jpegs, I do so in an external editor such as a Photoshop product..

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Comment #7

P001 wrote:.

I will be taking stage photos for a first time. Until now, I haveonly taken photos in *.jpg format, including some simplemanipuation/editing of photos in Photoshop, but saving the files as*.jpg files. The advice I've picked up about taking stage photos isto use the RAW format. I'm then assuming that, after uploading theRAW files into Photoshop, I can then save them as RAW files or as*.jpg files. Am I correct? Tom.

Here's what I would advise:.

Reserve a place on your hard disk for the unmodified JPEG and/or RAW files. Most people like to download into folders divided/named by shooting date, but whatever you find convenient..

Make at least one offline backup of this, ideally before you delete the originals from your memory card..

Reserve another place on your hard disk for processed images. Organise them any way you want..

When you have decided which images to process, open the RAW files in Photoshop, process/edit/retouch as necessary, and save the edited files (complete with layers etc. if applicable) in Photoshop PSD format. I can think of no good reason to use any other format, and by using PSD you are guaranteed that everything you have done is supported by the file format you use. This becomes especially important with advanced features such CS3's Smart Filters..

If you need the image in JPEG format, such as to send to a publisher or to post on the web, make this 'on demand' for the specific purpose. That way you can adjust the size, colour profile, sharpness and so on as appropriate..

If you need a different version of the image - let's say you want a black and white print - you can either use your Photoshop file and work on that (remembering to save under another name of course), or you can go right back to the RAW file. RAW converters (most, if not all) also save the parameters you used when you previously converted the RAW file, so you have an easy starting point for your new version...

Comment #8

Tom.

RAW files can not be opened in PS. They are opened in ACR which is a plug-in used with PS. Once the PP and converted image data is transfered from ACR to PS it is no longer in a RAW format, it opens in PS in a format as defined by the default work space in PS. You can not save an image in the RAW format from within PS. Your best bet is to save the image data in a lossless compressed or uncompressed file format which supports layers such as psd, or tiff.EdSee some notes below.....

P001 wrote:.

I will be taking stage photos for a first time. Until now, I haveonly taken photos in *.jpg format, including some simplemanipuation/editing of photos in Photoshop, but saving the files as*.jpg files. The advice I've picked up about taking stage photos isto use the RAW format. I'm then assuming that, after uploading theRAW files into Photoshop, I can then save them as RAW files or as*.jpg files. Am I correct? Tom.

Understanding Digital RAW.

Press the Shutter Release in your camera, What Happens?.

1) Light strikes the CCD.

Light strikes the CCD when the shutter release is pressed. Raw data is produced by the CCD. (This CCD takes the place of film in the old film cameras)This RAW data from the CCD is not yet stored..

2) A RAW data file is produced:.

If the Camera if set to RAW, then a raw data file is produced and stored in the camera on the memory card. This file may contain the camera settings (ie: White Balance, Sharpening, Color Mode, Saturation, etc.) but these parameter settings have not been applied to the raw data file. They are stored in the file for reference only and called Metadata. Changing these camera settings will not affect the raw data in the file. The amount of light falling on the sensor will change the raw data and therefore the shutter speed, aperture, ISO and lens filters will effect the raw data. This raw data file is a proprietary file type which is different for different manufacturers.



Jpg file produced in camera:.

If the Camera is set to jpg, then the computer in the camera uses the camera settings, of White Balance, Sharpening, Color Mode, Saturation, etc. to produce a jpg file on the fly, from the raw data. This takes place right when the shutter release is pressed. The camera has it's own RAW data conversion program, just not as versatile as the programs discussed in the next paragraph, below. Once the jpg file is produced in the camera, changing any in camera settings will only affect new pictures taken. The conversion from RAW to jpg can not be redone, as it can with the raw conversion programs discussed below..

3) Transfer the RAW file to computer for processing:.

Once the raw data file is transferred into your computer you can perform post processing (PP) of the RAW data and then save it into another format (tiff, jpg, etc), by using Nikon Capture NX (CNX) or Adobe Camera Raw (ACR), or any other raw conversion program. The conversion parameters you use in these programs can be changed and the conversion of the raw data performed as many times as you like. The raw file is not changed. Only the processing parameters are changed and saved. The initial set of conversion parameters are called the default set, and affect your initial screen preview of the image. The RAW data must initially be converted to view on the screen.

These programs instead, offer many more complex parameter changes and adjustments that are not available in the camera. The repeated processing ability and extensive parameter changes are only two of the advantages of these raw conversion programs like CNX and ACR..

Transfer jpg file to computer for editing and processing..

If you selected a jpg file in camera, then you will transfer this jpg file to your computer for editing, not for RAW data processing which has already been done in the camera. You will use editing/organizational programs such as Photoshop (PS) , Lightroom (LR), Bridge, (Capture NX also has some editing ability), etc. Each of these programs offers a different set of features and objectives. Some are more editing oriented, others more organizational, and some overlap in features. Some of these programs also accept files directly from the raw conversion programs. But these programs are not to be confused with the raw conversion programs themselves.



(Note: as stated some programs like Capture NX may do both RAW conversion and some other editing features.).

Some advantages in using raw data files.

1) RAW data is normally in 10 or 12 bit depth, where the converted jpeg file in the camera is 8bit..

2) Raw conversion programs offer many more and more detailed complex adjustments, than available in the camera RAW conversion programs..

3) Conversions which can be applied to RAW data, can not be applied as successfully to RGB data files such as Tiff, jpeg, etc. You have more control over raw data resulting in better processing results..

4) Raw data conversion parameters can be changed and then applied again to the same raw data. If we are not satisfied with our results, we can just tweak the parameters and convert once again..

5) The raw data in RAW data files is not altered. The conversion parameters are being changed and stored with the file (or in an associated file), but the raw data is left unchanged..

Some disadvantages in using raw data files.

1) Raw data files are 2-6 times larger than the corresponding jpeg files..

2) Post processing takes some extra time. How much really depends on your demands and criteria. Most raw conversion programs offer batch processing to speed things up when applying the same conversion parameters to multiple images...

Comment #9

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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