snubbr.com

quickie-is a uv filter the same as uv haze filter?
And, is this the best lens filter for normal everyday use?.

Thanks,Rough stuff -it's good for you..

Comments (9)

1. yes2. can of worms..

I personally have a UV filter on lenses at work... because I take cameras into really nasty places. I also bump into things a lot... (G) The UV filter offers some limited protection to the lens. There are others that will argue that the only time to have a filter on the lens is when you really *need* the filter on the lens..

Crime Scene PhotographyA small gallery of personal work: http://picasaweb.google.com/PID885..

Comment #1

Essentially, it's the same filter because haze or smog tends to dissipate the UV in the atmosphere. This filter cuts down on the UV radiation entering the lens..

However, all glass does this, so you might not see any real effect. You will reduce the resolution slightly because there's one more piece of glass to cause optical problems..

I generally keep one on my lenses at all times just because it's cheap insurance (compared to scratching the front optic), but I get the best one I can afford..

A Skylight filter is pretty much the same thimg, but has a slight pinkish tinge. Film was different in that you couldn't change the white balance, so that filter was better for bright daylight. (Skies were more vibrant.) If that's the effect you want, then a polarizer is a much more useful filter..

Best of luck,Parry..

Comment #2

Roughly - yes..

You can also get very high quality plain optical glass filters for lens protection..

Beware of paying good money for a decent lens and then sticking rubbish on the end of it as protection..

Regards, David..

Comment #3

Thanks everyone, it's great to be able to learn from you. cheers, PaulRough stuff -it's good for you..

Comment #4

Caoedhen wrote:.

1. yes.

Agree.

2. can of worms..

Also agree .

I personally have a UV filter on lenses at work... because I takecameras into really nasty places. I also bump into things a lot...(G) The UV filter offers some limited protection to the lens. Thereare others that will argue that the only time to have a filter on thelens is when you really *need* the filter on the lens..

I've been there. Now I am in the other camp: no filter unless needed. Spray, mud, ice, if this kind of hazards are there, I'll slap an UV filter on..

I've seen a lens dropped, UV filter shattering _under_ the cap and scratching the front element. Not a pretty sight. And, of course, there is always the idea of a 20$ filter in front of a 500$ lens... or 200$ filter in front of 700$ lens... Neither makes big sense to me..

Of course, your mileage might vary and I guess it boils down to personal preference./d/n..

Comment #5

Devnull wrote:.

I've seen a lens dropped, UV filter shattering _under_ the cap andscratching the front element. Not a pretty sight. And, of course,there is always the idea of a 20$ filter in front of a 500$ lens...or 200$ filter in front of 700$ lens... Neither makes big sense to me..

I was with a friend who dropped his $1600 telephoto zoom lens and camera on the concrete sidewalk when the strap on his camera suddenly broke! I saw the tears well up in his eyes when he took off the lens cap and looked at the front of his lens..

However, I reached over and carefully shook away the glass and unscrewed what was left of the UV filter. The lens functioned perfectly, as did his camera. To him, the filter was cheap insurance. Now in the case of your other friend (or you?) with the scratched front optic, imagine what would have happened otherwise had he not had a filter at all !.

When it's really important to have the best possible quality or when I need another filter, I'll remove my UV but in the meantime, I'll stick with my cheap insurance, even if it's a $100 B+W filter to me, it's part of the cost of the lens..

Now, a good lens hood is another matter completely it does a decent job of protecting the front optic as well a providing a function that gives you better photos all of the time (except while using a pup-up flash). If I've got a decent lens hood (like on my 80-200 f2.8) I'm happy without a filter most of the time. A wide-normal zoom hood has notches which defeat the protective purpose..

Parry..

Comment #6

Parry Johnson wrote:.

Devnull wrote:.

I've seen a lens dropped, UV filter shattering _under_ the cap andscratching the front element. Not a pretty sight. And, of course,there is always the idea of a 20$ filter in front of a 500$ lens...or 200$ filter in front of 700$ lens... Neither makes big sense to me..

I was with a friend who dropped his $1600 telephoto zoom lens andcamera on the concrete sidewalk when the strap on his camera suddenlybroke! I saw the tears well up in his eyes when he took off the lenscap and looked at the front of his lens..

Insurance. Now in the case of your other friend (or you?) with thescratched front optic, imagine what would have happened otherwise hadhe not had a filter at all !.

It wasn't me, thankfully.  Iin that situation nothing would have happened. I've seen before lenses falling 25 cm on a rug, from the top of the bag where they were left, and there were no consequences..

My theory is that a significant amount of the fall energy got somehow applied to a sharp tip of the shattered filter and it scratched the front element. Furthermore, in all the fall accidents I saw, the lens cap got a bit damaged. Not here..

Surely, it's a matter of guess, opinion and chances..

I agree on the hood - always keep them on. I also believe that the hood is a good fall protector for all lenses, including wide ones. They just have to take the shock. BTW, the filter image quality problems are more obvious on wide lenses .

/d/n..

Comment #7

Parry Johnson wrote:.

A wide-normal zoom hood has notches whichdefeat the protective purpose..

Not sure the notches are that much a disadvantage. The petal-type hood on my lens saved me from a serious problem. See my comment in this thread:http://forums.dpreview.com/...ums/readflat.asp?forum=1018&thread=24713597Regards,Peter..

Comment #8

No but you won't notice the difference, or use a skylight. But get a good quality one whichever you choose.Jules.

Kiwiinchina wrote:.

And, is this the best lens filter for normal everyday use?.

Thanks,Rough stuff -it's good for you.

Why do you never see birds crash?..

Comment #9

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.