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product photography beginner
I want to start doing product photography. I have a nikon d80 kit with the 18 - 135 mm and the 55mm / f1.8 and now I want to buy the SB600. What studio lights and light box do I need for start?Thank's for help...

Comments (6)

Mediatics wrote:.

I want to start doing product photography. I have a nikon d80 kitwith the 18 - 135 mm and the 55mm / f1.8 and now I want to buy theSB600. What studio lights and light box do I need for start?Thank's for help..

What type of products? what size etc ...

You don't necesarily need a light box (to go under them I mean), you could just shoot them on white card..

Rather than studio lights you could just bounce your flash off a white ceiling..

All depends what actual effect you are trying to get in the product shots and how much money you are willing to spend, or will earn from the shots..

Mark_A..

Comment #1

I want to shoot from a watch to a glass with flowers. The images I want to use in magazines and internet and I just want simple images with the products and white background...

Comment #2

Start with Nikon's 60mm macro lens and the camera on a tripod. Plan to use two lights bounced into white umbrellas off camera. You can't shoot still lifes or product shots with a built in or on camera flash..

Check out the Lowel Ego, Cloud Dome or EZ Cube:http://www.bermangraphics.com/.../digital-jury-resources/digital-lighting.htmhttp://www.ezcube.com/.

Larry Bermanhttp://BermanGraphics.com..

Comment #3

Before spending money on lights I would recommend that you buy the lighting seminar series from these folks: http://poweroflighting.com/ You'll learn a good deal about tungsten lighting and color temperature in addition to application of various sources...

Comment #4

We shot a hat the other day without even using our JTL hot lights. just a half-open garage door and a small gold reflector to fill in the shadows on the side. to get enough of the hat in focus I shot at f8 (on a canon 5D) so you don't necessarily need fast lenses for product shots (unless you really want things blurry)..

For other products we'll use two softboxes. one to provide primary light and the other to fill shadows. but with reflective surfaces too much light can be a problem (we shot a lambskin leather jacket in near darkness because otherwise it was too shiny/wrinkly)..

Shooting tethered to a laptop can be handy if it's a hike to the main computer..

Foamcore is your friend. you may want to invest in a masking program like vertus fluid mask..

I think you need to get creative and each product may require a different setup. I try to use a tripod (and remote timer) whenever possible...

Comment #5

Mediatics wrote:.

I want to start doing product photography. I have a nikon d80 kitwith the 18 - 135 mm and the 55mm / f1.8 and now I want to buy theSB600. What studio lights and light box do I need for start?Thank's for help..

Mediatics wrote:.

I want to shoot from a watch to a glass with flowers. The images Iwant to use in magazines and internet and I just want simple imageswith the products and white background..

Use the 50/1.8 wherever you can, stopped down to about f/8 to f/11. Use f/16 or higher only if you are forced to to get enough depth of field. The 50/1.8 is sharper, and distortion is low - important for straight-sided objects where even the slightest barrel distortion is unacceptable..

Always use a tripod and preferably a remote release. I like to work 'tethered', i.e. with the camera connected to the PC with a USB cable. I don't know anything about the Nikon software (mine's Canon) but getting your shots on screen instantly is ideal when you're trying to get the lighting just right. It also helps with critical focus and depth of field..

The easiest lights to use are photographic halogen lights. They weren't very good for film because they are not daylight coloured, but for digital it doesn't matter, just do a custom white balance. Shut out any outside light so you won't get problems with different coloured light sources..

Use your lowest ISO - don't worry if the exposures run to a couple of seconds or so, that's why you are using a tripod..

Get yourself some big sheets of white card, and also black card for 'black reflectors'. It's easy to make a curved card background with no horizon line - but you'll be surprised how big the sheets have to be..

If you want a truly white background you will need to illuminate the background separately. Depending on the kind of work you are doing, you may be able to do that in Photoshop instead..

A polarising filter can be extremely useful to control reflections..

I started out with none of that - I used daylight. But I wouldn't want to go back ..

Comment #6

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