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Problem with E510 S,M,A
I recently bought an Olympus E-510 and while I love it I am having some problems with the manual settings. Whenever I have it set up no to use a flash the photo comes up completely black, and yes, I removed the lens cap .

As of now I am primarily shooting college basketball games but have experienced this problem anytime I have it set to one of these settings w/o flash..

Has anyone experienced this problem, and if so how do I go about fixing it?.

Thanks for your help!Olympus E-510..

Comments (19)

First of all what mode are you using M or Auto. Second it most likely an exposure setting, I don't know how new you are, please explain. This will help you with your set up, this guy loves Oly's and can translate some of there terminology http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/oly-e/e500-sett.html also read some of the other articles like the review on the 510. This site will help you with EV (Exposure Value) http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm read the whole article there are some good tips here although he uses film cameras they still apply. Good luck from one 510 owner to another.Tim..

Comment #1

Sorry I just caught the S,M,A, you said basket ball right, I set my WB on auto most of the time, ISO 100, Try F5.6 first, then play with the shutter speed 1/125, and depress the shutter half way at your shot, look at the meter on the back of the camera if it to the left use a slower shutter speed, to the right use a faster speed, just play around in Manual the shots are free and just erase after you learn. Then the other settings will come easier.Tim..

Comment #2

I'm relatively new...I know how to work the camera and what everything means, I'm just having some trouble in this area....

This is an example of the problem I am having. The following picture was taken with F5.4, shutter at 1/125 and EV at +5.0. It is a picture of my computer maybe two feet away with all the lights on in my room..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

It only happens when a flash is not used, when the flash is up the picture comes out fine.Olympus E-510..

Comment #3

Make the shutter speed longer and let the other setting remain the same. Try 1/250 or 1/500 and don't forget to read those links..

Tim..

Comment #4

Also push the WB button and make sure it's set on auto.Tim..

Comment #5

I'm relatively new...I know how to work the camera and whateverything means, I'm just having some trouble in this area....

This is an example of the problem I am having. The following picturewas taken with F5.4, shutter at 1/125 and EV at +5.0. It is apicture of my computer maybe two feet away with all the lights on inmy room..

This is grossly underexposed, but that is possibly not surprising. A shutter speed of 1/125 sec at f/5.4 is the sort of exposure appropriate for use outside on a cloudy day. A room could be hundreds of times dimmer..

What ISO setting were you using? This determines the sensitivity of the sensor and is like a volume control. I suspect on your camera the minimum value is 100 and this may be what you used. Try increasing it up to 800 or 1600....

Most importantly - a simple experiment. All the pictures you have reported having trouble with were taken indoors, where the light is relatively dim. (It may look bright but that's just the pupil in your eye opening up to compensate). Take the camera outside during daylight. Set it to 'A' mode, set the lens aperture to f/5.6, and take a picture of anything - a house, the street, your feet... try not to include too much bright sky in the picture as that can fool the light meter.



Best wishesMike..

Comment #6

Make the shutter speed longer and let the other setting remain thesame. Try 1/250 or 1/500 and don't forget to read those links..

Scooter, right idea, but those are SHORTER shutter speeds (1/250 sec is less time than 1/125 sec). Longer shutter speeds would be 1/60 sec, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8 sec etc.....

Best wishesMike..

Comment #7

... assuming that your camera works fine in daylight, it is interesting that your problem only happens in A/S/M modes (where you have control over at least one setting). I assume from that, that ini fully-automatic mode (usually called 'P') the exposures are OK because the camera is taking care of everything..

For pictures indoors without flash, try this....

(i) set the ISO to it's maximum value (probably 1600).

(ii) set the camera to 'A' (aperture priority) mode, whereby you set the lens opening (aperture) and the camera adjusts the shutter speed to suit.

(iii) set the lens to it's widest possible aperture (to let in the maximum possible amount of light). This equates to the SMALLEST number, which might be something like 3.5 or 5.6 depending on your lens. The big numbers (like 16 and 22) equate to very small pinhole-like openings which hardly let any light in..

Then take a picture. The camera will choose a shutter speed to give a correct exposure based on what aperture you have set and how much light is available. In a well-lit (electric light) room with no daylight you should, under these conditions, end up with a shutter speed somewhere in the vicinity of 1/30 - 1/60 sec, and you should get a well-exposed picture..

If the shutter speed is quite slow the picture may be blurred due to camera shake but that is a separate issue. You may also see that the picture has a yellow cast, due to the colour of the tungsten light bulbs: if so set the white balance to the correct setting for light bulbs and try again, you should get a picture with the correct colours..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #8

PDenman wrote:.

This is an example of the problem I am having. The following picturewas taken with F5.4, shutter at 1/125 and EV at +5.0. It is apicture of my computer maybe two feet away with all the lights on inmy room..

Http://i2.tinypic.com/6kae6fb.jpg.

Happily you left the EXIF data in the image you posted so I was able to check what said (don't be offended, I never trust anyone, not even myself )..

You used ISO 100, Shutter priority, 1/250 (and +5 EC but I'll come back to that). That leaves the camera choosing the aperture, and it chose the largest available which was f/3.5 - there was nowhere near enough light but there was nothing else the camera could do..

I don't have an Olympus camera so I'm not familiar with the specific controls, but it is true of every camera that if you use shutter priority there is a danger of underexposure due to 'running out of apertures'. The metering system was probably warning you somehow - my Canon simply flashes the f-number in this situation - read the manual to find out what yours does..

Solutions are:.

In low light without flash, use a higher ISO speed. This increases the sensitivity of the sensor, but images will be noisier - it's a simple trade-off..

Use shutter priority only when you actually need to control shutter speed - in my experience that is not very often, but it does depend on the type of photography you do of course. Aperture priority or full auto would have given the camera the freedom to choose a suitable shutter speed for a correct exposure. It would have been very long of course, so camera shake blur would be a near certainty!.

Experiment in full auto mode (sorry, don't know Olympus's terminology). Let the camera choose the settings then examine what it has done. You'll learn a lot from that. I notice you actually gave the wrong settings for your example image - most image editors will report the actual settings, do you have something you can use?.

Finally, exposure compensation. The way this works is to effectively 'fake' a lower or higher meter reading to force exposures to be brighter or darker than normal. So if your subject is wearing a white shirt, which will trick the camera into thinking there is more light than there actually is, you can dial in (say) +1 EC to tell the camera you want a higher exposure. How the camera does that depends on the mode you are using, but it will be the same as if there was one stop less light. But exposure compensation has no relevance to your problem, as you can hopefully see now...

Comment #9

Sorry about sending you in the wrong direction with the shutter speed, it was 2 am and about two hours past bedtime. You can Just play with the shutter speed to get a good exposure. After you get that play with the F stops (Apeture) lower number = more light (exposure), you will learn to use the settings in manual this way. Now at the Basketball game you may want to use S (shutter priority) setting, this will allow to set a fast shutter speed to see the players in a stopped motion with a blurred backgound to show the movement. Here's a good rule of thumb, your using your 40-150 lens set at 150, your shutter speed must exceed 1/150 so you could use 1/180, if you subject is moving you must double that to 1/350, if you and your subject are moving then triple that to 1/500 or maybe a little more, get it. There's two more things the 510 takes better photos with the noise filter off, menu, camera 1, page down to noise filter, and off.



IS 2, I leave mine on IS 1 for most everything else. Good luck and post back here and let see how your shoots progress..

Tim..

Comment #10

Now at the Basketball game you may want to use S (shutter priority)setting, this will allow to set a fast shutter speed to see theplayers in a stopped motion with a blurred backgound to show themovement..

Only if there is enough light..

Here's a good rule of thumb, your using your 40-150 lensset at 150, your shutter speed must exceed 1/150 so you could use1/180, if you subject is moving you must double that to 1/350, if youand your subject are moving then triple that to 1/500 or maybe alittle more, get it..

This is the problem: in indoor light, using shutter priority mode, if you set a fast shutter speed to freeze the action, you would need a (very) wide aperture to let in enough light for a correct exposure. if you set 1/500 sec on the camera, you might need f/1.4 to get a correct exposure. If your lens only opens up to f/5.6 your picture will be underexposed by four stops, i.e. nearly black - as you have been describing..

It is better, in these circumstances, to use aperture priority mode (A) and set the lens to it's widest aperture to let in as much light as possible. Let the camera set the shutter speed it wants. That may well end up being too slow to freeze the action, but there is nothing you can do about this except spend a lot of money on a bigger lens with a wider aperture..

Best wishes.

Mike..

Comment #11

For shooting basketball, you'll need to set the ISO at 1600 to get any kind of fast shutter speed to stop the action..

IS does not stop action, just helps steady the camera..

And, unfortunately, you'll need to get a lens that opens up to at least f:2.8 or larger to let enough light in to get those faster shutter speeds..

The kit lenses are mostly for general shooting and are not good low light lenses..

To get an idea of what kind of exposure values are needed.try this:.

On your computer shot that you posted, aim your E-510 at the computer monitor and set the dial to 'P' (program exposure), hold the shutter button down halfway and look at the exposure values on the meter (right hand side in the viewfinder), then compare those numbers to what you manually set the camera at..

Chances are, in 'P' mode, you'll find that the camera is giving you much slower shutter speeds than what you set manually, and the camera will probably be selecting the biggest lens opening (smallest f:stop number - ie.- f:5.6, not f:16) possible..

Hope this helps..

J. D.Colorful Colorado.

From my E-510:.

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Remember.always keep the box and everything that came in it!..

Comment #12

Thank you all very much for the help. At the last game I just used the sports mode on the E-510 and for the most part they ended up being great, just slightly blurred - which is why I wanted to use a fast shutter speed to catch the action..

I'll be attending a game tomorrow night and will test out all the things that you all said and will let you know the out come. Again, thank you for your helpOlympus E-510..

Comment #13

Thanks again to everyone for their advice. I messed around with the different settings at tonight's game and got some great shots. For most of them I had the shutter speed at 1/250, F5.6, ISO at 1600, and the exposure rather high, and for the most part it worked wonders! While the noise was high (due to such a high ISO level) and some things were still slightly blurred, everything turned out perfectly..

Here are a few photos taken..

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Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

And just in case you were wonder (as I'm sure you all were  ) Washington State University won 67-45 and is still undefeated... go Cougs!Olympus E-510..

Comment #14

Excellent pics - I like the second one best. I'm glad it works now.Best wishesMike..

Comment #15

I am curious at ISO 1600 did you leave the Noise Filter on or off. Your pictures turned out Great.End of RantTim..

Comment #16

At first I had it turned off and then switch it to low and kept it there most of the time. The only time noise became an issue was when I zoom in on the pictures or if they were darker (I took a few of the crowd and they turned out darker and with more noise)Olympus E-510..

Comment #17

Thanks, I haven't had much need to shoot using higher ISO settings, your info is very helpful, I though it may come in handy on speeds over 400.End of RantTim..

Comment #18

Hi,.

I know it's a bit late in the day and you have the answers but I think that part of the problem is that modern cameras will still take a picture if it's beyond the scope of the ISO, aperture and speed setting. So when f/2 is needed & ISO 400 and the zoom only has f/56 available & you're on 50 ISO you get a dark picture..

There's probably something happening to warn you of this in the viewfinder or else it will bleep at you (if the bleep is switched on via the menu and you hear it above the crowd)..

BTW, Fred Parker's article on exposure is useful but if you want something handier, try the inside of a film box where a _simple_ guide will be printed (but not with Kodak Professional" film) or else down load the film data sheets for (say) Fuji "Superia" film (it's for 100 ASA/ISO, btw) and print out the little exposure guide on a bit of credit card sized card. Once seen and used you'll find the thing sticks in your memory and will remind you to over-ride or adjust the camera's settings from time to time..

Regards, David..

Comment #19

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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