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printing - resolution question
Let's say I have an image that is 3872 x 2592, 300DPI..

If I wanted to print this as a 5x7, could I safely do so with great results? I know the aspect ratio is the same, so I'm assuming I would get a great print (assuming great printer and great picture haha). But that's just a newbie assuming (dangerous, I know  ). Would I need to modify the image in any way for best results at 5x7?.

Note: i'm not talking about cropping, etc. Let's assume the image looks exactly as I want. I'm just trying to get an understanding for printing with the best results...

Comments (6)

Let's say I have an image that is 3872 x 2592, 300DPI..

If I wanted to print this as a 5x7, could I safely do so with greatresults? I know the aspect ratio is the same, so I'm assuming Iwould get a great print (assuming great printer and great picturehaha). But that's just a newbie assuming (dangerous, I know  ).Would I need to modify the image in any way for best results at 5x7?.

Note: i'm not talking about cropping, etc. Let's assume the imagelooks exactly as I want. I'm just trying to get an understanding forprinting with the best results..

As you describe it the print dimensions will be 12.9 x 8.6 inches..

This isn't 5 x 7 ratio. If you resize the image in photoshop (without resampling) so that the shorter edge is 5 inches long (at 518 dpi) then the longer edge will be nearly 7.5 inches long..

That apart, yes, you could shrink the image by changing the resolution to 518 dpi and it would look fine. That sort of resolution is higher than the human eye can resolve..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #1

WildBillJ wrote:.

Let's say I have an image that is 3872 x 2592, 300DPI..

The image is 3872 x 2592 pixels regardless of anything else. The DPI setting has nothing to do with the image size or quality; it is a print output setting..

If I wanted to print this as a 5x7, could I safely do so with greatresults? I know the aspect ratio is the same, so I'm assuming Iwould get a great print (assuming great printer and great picturehaha). But that's just a newbie assuming (dangerous, I know  ).Would I need to modify the image in any way for best results at 5x7?.

Printing at 300 DPI would give you a 13 by 8.5 inch print. At a print setting of 553 DPI would give you a print that is 7 inches along the long side (slightly less than 5 inches on the short side)..

Note: i'm not talking about cropping, etc. Let's assume the imagelooks exactly as I want. I'm just trying to get an understanding forprinting with the best results..

Most inkjets will ignore the DPI setting and use their own RIP (raster image processing) algorithms to give you a printed image of the size you specify from the digital image you start with..

Without buying expensive stand-alone RIP software, the only way to find out what works best with your printer is to experiment using the same image at different settings..

A 10 Mp image is overkill for a 5 x 7 inch print, it should be capable of stellar prints at much larger sizes..

Brian A...

Comment #2

Ok... I obviously have no clue what I'm talking about. I spent a lot of time last night just trying to figure out how to get half a dozen images optimized for printing as 5x7's and 4x6's.. and no sure I did it halfway right. Guess I'll know when I pick them up later..

Anyone have any links to articles describing best ways to optimize pictures for printing? Resolution, DPI, resampling.. it's all foreign to me..

I thought 3000x2000 was 3:2 (W:H), just like a 5x7 is 3:2. So I just assumed the bigger teh 3000x2000 number, the better it'd look if I printed as a 5x7. I never even gave any thought to the DPI.. which makes sense now that I actually stop to think about it...

Comment #3

I thought 3000x2000 was 3:2 (W:H),.

It is.

Just like a 5x7 is 3:2..

No it isn't. 7 divided by 5 is 1.4, not 1.5..

With a 2:3 aspect ratio, like on most DSLRs, you can print a 7.5 x 5 inch print, or (if you want 7 inches as the long edge) 7 x 4.66. If you really want a 7 x 5 inch print you will have to crop a little off each end to make the picture fit..

So I justassumed the bigger teh 3000x2000 number, the better it'd look if Iprinted as a 5x7. I never even gave any thought to the DPI.. whichmakes sense now that I actually stop to think about it..

Of course higher resolution looks better, but only up to a point. A good rule of thumb is that if you hold a print in your hand (i.e. looking at it from about 1 - 2 feet away) you can, possibly, resolve detail of 1/300 inch - i.e. you need 300 pixels per inch. With a 6MP camera (3000 x 2000 pixels on the sensor) that makes a print size of 10 x 6.66 inches..

However it is perfectly possible to print bigger pictures using a lower resolution. With the same 6 MP image, if you print at 200 pixels per inch you will get a 15 x 10 inch print. You tend to stand back to look at a larger picture, and the further back you stand, the less detail you can resolve. So if you hang your 15 x 10 inch picture on a wall and look at it from four or five feet away, at that distance 200 pixels per inch is still more than your eye can resolve and it will look perfectly sharp..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #4

RE>ok... I obviously have no clue what I'm talking about. <.

Maybe, but you are not alone. Andyou'll get the hang of it eventually..

As someone said, the 300DPI doesn't matter..

Plus, it ain't 300DPI, which is a term used in offset printing, it is 300ppi, a term used in digital photography..

If you hgave Photoshop or Photoshop Elements, go look in the resize box and you'll see the value is pixels/inch..

Dots, as in DPI, are what you see with a magnifying glass when looking at a picture in a newspaper..

Anyway....

There's a big difference in what to do if you are printing on an ink jet, or printing, usually at a store like Costco or Wallmart or Shoppers Drug Mart in Canada, where there's a computer screen you use and a Fuji or Noritsu (usually) machine connected..

Since you're going to get your photos somewhere, I'm assuming a machine at a store..

Things get complicated;.

Some stores Costco in Canada do not allow cropping on 4x6 prints, but do allow it opn larger prints. Other stores Shoppers Drug Mart for one allow cropping on all size prints..

As a general rule, for 5x7 and larger prints, do not resize your file..

If your original shot is, say, 2000 x 3000 pixels, leave it at this size..

Make your color changes, contrast changes, sharpening changes, etc.,, and then transfer the finished file to a CD or USB thumb drive or even a camera memory card, and take it to the store..

Insert the card/disk whatever into the machine, and you'll be offered the choice of enlargement sizes. Pick what you want, and you'll see a zoom/crop / edit or simialr command..

This takes you to a box outline (red in the stores I use) and you can make this box xmaller, and move it around the picxture. The machine automatically sets the saspect ratio of the box. 5x7 is different from 8x10, for instance..

Just move the box around on the full image until it is cropped to the way you like, and press the save button, or whatever. Then do it all over again for a different size print with a different aspect ratio..

This way, you only need one copy of the edited file, regardless of how many different size enlargements..

That's assuming you don't want cropped 4x6 prints in a store that does not allow cropping of 4x6 prints..

WHAT ABOUT ODD SIZES?.

But say you only want a 4 x 7 ratio on a print 7 inches wide, and are happy that the bottom inch of a 5x7 print is cut off..

Choice one is, of course, a paper cutter after the fact..

But, before hand, you can use software like Photoshop Elements to select a crop ratio of 4 x 7, leaving the units box blank..

Pull the crop marks over the image and it will automatically be in the 4 x 7 ratio. Position the crop box, double click, and now you have a file that when you take it to the store will end up with a one inch border..

Afterthis, it can get more complicated, and such as if you want to put two photos and some words on the same print. But that's for another day..

BAK..

Comment #5

You might want to take look at Qimage:.

Http://www.ddisoftware.com/qimage/.

I have been using it for about 7 years (with free upgrades). There is no need to worry about interpolation and DPI or PPI - You just print!.

It is also quite a good image editor..

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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