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print in maximum ppi
Hello.

Can you tell me please what is the maximum ppi or dpi normal printers can print? the maximum quality?.

I suppose this depends on the paper as well.

Also I would like to know the size of the pixel equivalent for printers.

Thanks..

Comments (9)

W333 wrote:.

Hello.

Can you tell me please what is the maximum ppi or dpi normal printerscan print? the maximum quality?.

I suppose this depends on the paper as well.

Also I would like to know the size of the pixel equivalent for printers.

Thanks.

Most printers are at 300dpi. However this is actually a much more complex issue than "300dpi means I need 300 pixels per inch". I'll defer to someone more knowledgeable, or if you don't get a response, try the printing forum...

Comment #1

Hi,.

They will quote all sorts of figures to baffle you like 5 or 6 thousands dpi for their printers but I think they really mean it uses dots at that many to the inch to get the exact colours you want on the paper from out of 5 or 6 coloured inks and the black ink and that in turn has come from 3 colours interpolated in the camera or editing suite to millions..

In practice I can't see much difference (and I've sliced up glossy papers and put them under the microscope at x40) once you get over the printer's 1440 dpi. When it comes to printing I specify the size on the paper and it works out at about 295-300 ish right down to 150-ish ppi and the printer does it at 1440 dpi and people are happy with it. (And printer software will happily turn out 32 x 24" from 4 or 5 megapixels and no one notices the dpi or ppi: although they do notice the paper used a lot, especially some matte papers.).

With printing people, theory and practice always differ: the subject is most important, imo..

Regards, David..

Comment #2

W333 wrote:.

Hello.

Can you tell me please what is the maximum ppi or dpi normal printerscan print?.

By "normal" I'll assume you mean the typical dot matrix photo printer..

These days you don't see any significant quality improvement over 300-350 ppi..

You can feed the printer pictures that have 400 or more ppi but won't see any difference. The extra pixels, I suspect, get lost in the printer driver..

The maximum quality?.

The max quality comes at about 300-350ppi on glossy or film (not to be confused with photo film, it's plastic that can be printed on)..

Different papers will have a different result. The texture of matte papers or even the coarse texture of the canvas papers are handy for photos that have a low pixel density (printed large) and give very nice results down to as low as 100ppi..

I suppose this depends on the paper as well.

Yes, see above..

Also I would like to know the size of the pixel equivalent for printers.

I don't understand the question. Try rephrasing it please..

Thanks.

David covered the dpi (dots per inch) issue in his answer above. Don't confuse the two as they are entirely different units of measurement..

A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #3

Thanks for your reply.

We measure the size of the pixel in cameras.

Whats the equivalent to measure in printers? the minimum dot a printer can print?..

Comment #4

Hi,.

Well, dig around in the printer manual and they might just tell you or use their help line..

If it's any use to you my one does 180 dpi for "Draft" (that's faint grey for black, faint pink for red and so on), 360 dpi for text, 720 dpi for text and images, "photo" at 1440 dpi, "best photo" is 2880 and something else, "(optimised)" it says only spelt wrongly with a "z" in it, at 5760 dpi. It also prints fast or slow and, again, I've not noticed the difference..

I wouldn't worry about it in your shoes. If you want to waste a few shillings and minutes chose a complicated photo and print it at whatever 300 ppi comes too. Better still, copy the file, crop it down to a quarter the size (that's half the number of pixels on each side) and then print that the same size as the full one was done. Now get a magnifying glass and examine carefully. Then stick on a wall and walk around normally and look at it from time to time. You'll learn a lot that's usefull that way.



Look up pixelated in the dictionary, btw..

Regards, David..

Comment #5

W333 wrote:.

Thanks for your reply.

We measure the size of the pixel in cameras.

Whats the equivalent to measure in printers? the minimum dot aprinter can print?.

I suspect that there is some miscommunication going on in this thread. It would make it easier to answer this question if you explained why you need an answer..

Cameras produce an image that is measured in pixels. When you specify a print size, you can calculate the numbers of Pixels Per Inch (PPI) of resolution that you will have in the print. Other posters have commented on this. Note that Pixels Per Inch (PPI) and Dots Per Inch (DPI) are often confused in discussions about printing..

The printing software will pass the image file to the printer driver which will convert it to a standard resolution (normally 360, 600 or 720 PPI) before passing it to the printer..

The printer needs to lay down a pattern of several dots to recreate each of the pixels in the image. This pattern is called dithering and each manufacturer will have a different dithering algorithm. Sometimes they will use more or less detailed dithering patterns depending on the print mode: draft/normal/best etc. On some older printers, especially the Epson 2100/2200, these modes are actually specified in DPI: 360/720/1440 DPI. One of the replies on this thread refers to this..

About 3-4 years ago the printer marketing departments realised that they might be able to sell more printers if they increased the quoted number of dots. They therefore changed the definition of DPI to the maximum value that they could justify - often the maximum number of dot positions rather than the maximum number of dots. For this reason DPI numbers quoted in printer specifications are not very meaningful..

Another measure is the size of the dot. This is specified as the volume of the droplet of ink in picolitres, pl, and is normally in the range 2-5pl. Some Canon printers and one or two from Epson have used 1.5 or 1.0 pl droplets to avoid the need for Light Magenta and Light Cyan inks. This doesn't necessarily produce better quality prints, it just reduces the number of ink cartridges. I believe that some printers (HP?) can vary the droplet size. Note that some professional printers have quite large droplet sizes..

In summary, neither the printer's quoted DPI nor the droplet size necessarily affects the quality of the final print. Different manufacturers achieve the same end result by different routes and, indeed, there is very little difference in colour print quality from the 6+ ink photo printers from Canon, Epson and HP.Chris R..

Comment #6

Hi,.

I suspect that the smaller the dot from the printer, then the more subtle the colours available. Any comments?.

As you say, in practice they all look the same and I suspect the subject of the picture is far more important than anything else to 95% of users, who don't give a monkey's about resolution, WB, composition etc, etc..

Regards, David..

Comment #7

David Hughes wrote:.

Hi,.

I suspect that the smaller the dot from the printer, then the moresubtle the colours available. Any comments?.

Doesn't seem to be that way. As I said, I think that the Epson professional printers (4880, 7880, 9880) use quite large droplets and I am sure that their colours don't suffer. The more serious Canon printers like the Pro9500 still use light cyan/light magenta, so I assume that they use larger droplets as well..

So far small droplets only seem to have been used to avoid the need for light cyan/magenta, but on the Epson R800/R1800 they then added Red and Blue so you still have 8 cartridges. Canon have quite a good line of cheaper 4 and 5 ink photo printers, though, which produce almost as good print quality as a 6 ink printer.Chris R..

Comment #8

Hi (again),.

Thanks mine says 5760 dpi (on suitable media), smallest dot is 3 wotsits and it has the six inks including light cyan/light magenta. So I wondered. I looked up the manual again: now I'm baffled as I've a reference to "Fine" which I've never seen in use..

Regards, David..

Comment #9

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