snubbr.com

portraits using 2.8 lens.
Can someone explain to me where I should set the aperture for portraits. I have a 70-200 2.8, (which I know is really not for portraits) and was told to set it wide open for sports. Where should I set it for indoor pictures or portraits? How does my picture change as I set it at different apertures?.

I know this really is probably a dumb question but I am slowly lerning...

Comments (11)

The closer the aperture gets to 2.8 the smaller the area in focus gets and the more blurred the background gets.

Stevehabig wrote:.

Can someone explain to me where I should set the aperture forportraits. I have a 70-200 2.8, (which I know is really not forportraits) and was told to set it wide open for sports. Where shouldI set it for indoor pictures or portraits? How does my picturechange as I set it at different apertures?.

I know this really is probably a dumb question but I am slowly lerning...

Comment #1

Stevehabig wrote:.

Can someone explain to me where I should set the aperture forportraits. I have a 70-200 2.8, (which I know is really not forportraits) and was told to set it wide open for sports. Where shouldI set it for indoor pictures or portraits? How does my picturechange as I set it at different apertures?.

I know this really is probably a dumb question but I am slowly lerning..

There is no shortcut, evaluate this by yourself! In the digital age you can get feedback from camera immediately. The 70-200 should be o.k. for portraits on a focal length until 135 mm or even more. Who said the 70-200 is not good for portraits?.

/Wolfgang..

Comment #2

Stevehabig wrote:.

Can someone explain to me where I should set the aperture forportraits. I have a 70-200 2.8, (which I know is really not forportraits) and was told to set it wide open for sports. Where shouldI set it for indoor pictures or portraits? How does my picturechange as I set it at different apertures?.

On a D80 (some research tells me that is your DSLR) or any other crop frame DSLR use the wide angle end of your lens and shoot from about 12 foot away to fill the frame with the shot you want (that probably means you will be around 70-90mm). Use f/2.8 if you want to isolate your subject from the background or a narrower aperture (bigger number) if you want to increase the depth of field e.g to include some feature in the background such as a certificate on the wall or whatever..

Depth of field changes to get deeper at narrower apertures:-.

Http://www.dofmaster.com/doftable.html.

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #3

My 70-200 is a great lens for portraits, not for studio but outdoors I use it all the time..

I almost always shoot at F2.8 simply because I love to throw the background out of focus...

Comment #4

Hi Steve.

First thing to try and get your mind used to and it will open up many doors,is that there are few "right or wrong" things when it comes to art. If the shots comes out just like you preceived it before you took it then it is right. and let no one tell you differant..

Myself I love my 70-200 for portraits because of the compression it creates and the shallow DOF when close up..

Then there are times where I will want just the opposite to happen and will want everything in focus from what's in front of them...all of them and everything behind them..

I have many shots where only one eye is in focus and the rest of the face goes out and in reverse like an old woman from Chile with wonderfull lines all over her face where everything deserved to be in focus..

Learn all the rules and remember what they are....then start braking each one of them. Thats when it can get good and styles come from..

Good Luck'The moment you think your great is the moment you quit learning.'http://www.gawalters.com..

Comment #5

1/ RE>I know this really is probably a dumb question but I am slowly lerning.<.

Not really dumb... there are a lot of lenses people think of as "portrait" lenses with focal lengths that are within the 70-200 range, although most are near the 70mm end..

Pick your aperture to get the depth of field you want, and/or the shutter speed you want..

There's a compulstion if DPR to have people's noses and ears fuzzy, and their eyes sharp. That's the f2.8 part of your lens, or the f2 or f1.8 or f1.4 or f1.2 part of other lenses..

DEcide for yourself how much the background matters. If it's a portrait of a farmer with his field of pumpkins, you probably want a small aperture (f11, f16) so people can see his crop and his tractor..

If it's a portrait of a little girl in front of a garbage dump, you want f2.8 to make the garbage dump into a blurry lump, without the garbage being sharp..

And you need to define portrait if it includes a kid sitting twenty feet up on a tree branch, a 200mm lens is a good thing..

BAK..

Comment #6

Please take some time to pick up a book on photography basics. Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" is a good one. It will most likely answer all of your beginner questions...

Comment #7

Not a dumb question per se, just a little odd coming from someone who just spent $1600 on a really high end lens. Didn't we go over this before when you were asking about what changing the ISO does to your exposure parameters?..

Comment #8

Stevehabig wrote:.

Can someone explain to me where I should set the aperture forportraits. I have a 70-200 2.8, (which I know is really not forportraits) and was told to set it wide open for sports..

I use my 70-200 f2.8 for portraits all the time. Why wouldn't you? The reason you were told to set it wide open for spports was to get the shutter speed up, but even that blanket statement is wrong. If you are shooting sports outside and have plenty of light I'd suggest stopping down to get more DOF..

Where should I set it for indoor pictures or portraits?.

Here again, you are asking for a blanket statement that simply cannot be given once for all situations..

How does my picture change as I set it at different apertures?.

Now you're asking the right question. As already mentioned, wider apertures (smaller f-numbers) affect the shutter speed needed to get a proper exposure. With non moving subjects, you don't need as much shutter speed to stop subject motion. Although, unless you use a tripod, camera motion will require a higher shutter speed the more you zoom in. Remember the 1/shutter speed rule..

Changing the aperture also affects DOF as does the focal length. In order to get the subject in focus and have the BG nicely blurred, a longer focal length and wider aperture are usually used. I routinely shoot portraits at 100-200mm and apertures as small as I can manage. This doesn't work well with strobes unless you can really drop the power output, but natural light portraits are much nicer with a wider aperture..

I know this really is probably a dumb question but I am slowly lerning..

Just learn to ask the right questions! Rather than trying to remember a set of settings someone spews out for each and every situation, learn to read your meter and learn what settings affect what aspects of a photo. Learning these fundamental principles will let you use pretty much ANY camera with confidence..

Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #9

Yes, we probably did discuss ISO..

I spent a lot of money for this lens because:.

1. I wanted 1 reaaly good lens for shooting sport action shots2. I wanted to get as sharp of pictures I coud get.3. I did not want to buy a cheaper lens and then have regrets later on..

I took some portraits of my boys the other day, indoors with the SB 600 using 2.8. I guess I was a little disappointed in the clarity. But, I am sure it is just due to my inexperience...

Comment #10

Use this: http://www.dofmaster.com/doftable.html.

At the top, enter in the lens in MM and then select camera type, hit calculate and it will give a table of DOF at given distances and aperture...

Comment #11

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.