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Photo re-sizing help
Hi Folks,.

My dad owns a canon 30D and although he is ok at shooting photo's he has problems with post stuff, specifically re-sizing images..

He can't understand how to do it or get his head around dpi etc, he has photoshop on his PC. He ends up getting confused so falls back on setting the camera to shoot very small jpegs so losing the original sized images in the process. I've tried to explain it to him but he still can't get it..

Any simple online guides that explain how to re-size and the effect of dpi?.

Thanks!..

Comments (7)

Very basically: Open the image in Photoshop, crop to suit, adjust Levels or Curves to suit, and click on "Image" to alter the size. (Remember the original is huge like 3ft wide at 72dpi). To print set to 300 dpi and also set the intended width dimensions in mm, pixels (choose either). Click to keep the aspect ratio intact with "Constrain Proportions". Now Save As a different file name. (If you don't you will degrade the original JPG).

If you have problems with print colours/contrast and are not yet familiar with the editing program you can cheat by dropping the photo onto an open Word page (Word will sort it out automatically)John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #1

...let's say that you have a 1024x768 image. Now, that doesn't tell you much - just that you have a rectangle 1024 pixels wide with a 768 pixels height. Pixels do not have a dimension of themselves, so, if you want to print to a certain size, you must know how many pixels your printer can squeeze in an inch. Usually, that will be something around 300 dpi. So, your image will print to 1024/300 x 768/300 or 3.4 x 2.56 inch. Accordingly, on your monitor which has, say, 100 dpi, that would show to 10.24 x 7.68 inch..

You may check these on Photoshop; Go to Image->Image size and un-check "Resample image". Modify resolution and see how width/height changes..

Alternatively, visithttp://www.luminous-landscape.com orhttp://www.cambridgeincolour.com for some quite good tutorials..

Hope it helped, I'm not much of a teacher ).

Regards,AdrianThere is no spoon.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/p_adr..

Comment #2

The question about resizing and DPI raises another question: for what purpose is the resizing being done?.

If it's in order to produce a modest-sized image for emailing or web use, them DPI plays no part at all, the image simply needs to be resized in terms of pixel dimensions, to say 800 or 1024 pixels on the longest side. Job done..

On the other hand, if it is in order to print, then the pixel size does not need to change at all. There are also programs which will print an image without ever having to consider DPI at all. Paint Shop Pro and Acdsee are two programs I've used for printing, and simply use the "fit to page" option..

Things only get more complicated when the image is not the same proportions as the paper, when it may need to be cropped - but not resized.Regards,Peter..

Comment #3

It almost sounds like he's shooting small images so the 100% view will fit on the monitor without resizing....

If that's the case check out something like IrfanView which lets you easily view images fit to your screen...

Comment #4

Chris Charlton wrote:.

Hi Folks,.

My dad owns a canon 30D and although he is ok at shooting photo's hehas problems with post stuff, specifically re-sizing images..

He can't understand how to do it or get his head around dpi etc, hehas photoshop on his PC. He ends up getting confused so falls back onsetting the camera to shoot very small jpegs so losing the originalsized images in the process. I've tried to explain it to him but hestill can't get it..

Any simple online guides that explain how to re-size and the effectof dpi?.

Thanks!.

Tell your Dad not to feel bad. The ppi (pixels per inch) is one of the most miss understood settings in PS..

First, image files as they come from the camera have no ppi information. It is not relevant to your image file. PS adds this information and really confuses everyone to some degree. Again ppi is not relevant to the actual image, and dpi is different. DPI is relevant to how an inkjet printer constructs pixels from CMYK ink dots, but lets not get into that here. Ppi is the setting in PS that we are discussing..

Why does PS add and ask for ppi information from a user. Because it works with bit map images (like the ones that we get from our camera) and it can also work with vector images like, shapes, paths, type (fonts), etc. Both of these can be in the same image (on different layers) when we are designing images and PP in PS. When we add type, we must select the type size and people like to use points (pts) as type size. 12pt, 18pt, 56pt, etc. What is a point? Well a pt is about 1/72 of an inch.

So it is imperative that PS knows the physical size of you intended image in order to size the type correctly on screen and print. We could avoid this but people like to specify type in pts..

In a nut shell, the ppi may be initially selected and entered into PS as the size we intend to print our composite image, but when we actually go to print our image, we can pick any size to print. We are not restricted to the ppi size. We can also change the saved ppi size that is in the image file at any time without changing our image data. So the ppi setting is a guide line but really has no effect on our image data. Our image data does not need ppi information..

Where we must be extremely careful in PS, is that PS may at times resample our actual image data (change our data) , and most people dont even know it has happened. The crop tool is notorious for this unseen re-sampling if we place a number in the resolution input box at the top of the crop tool screen. This is not recommended if you do not understand re-sampling and what it is used for, so always leave this input resolution box blank. Also, when resizing an image on the canvas, PS will resample the image unless a smart object was used. So do not resize an image on the canvas unless you know what you are doing, and understand whats going on behind the scene..

My recommendation is to always keep your image at the maximum resolution and do not resample it at all while in PSCS3. Use smart objects whenever you can on the images. This preserves the original pixel data. Crop your images to the ratio you need for printing, but still keep the original pixels, do not resample..

I am not saying that re-sampling is not to be used at times, but you really should have a complete understanding before you start to resample images, and why you want to...

Comment #5

The simplest way to downsize an image (jpeg) for monitor viewing or small prints is to simply use 'save for web' and enter the size you want (600x800 for example) and use the highest quality if file size is not a concern. Then save the downsized photo. Your original full size image remains intact. That's it. If you want a different size in the future, open the original in save for web and simply choose the size..

It is only to upsize an image for printing that you need bother with any of that other stuff people are talking about...

Comment #6

Oops. What I should have said was to choose the desired dimension for either length or width and the other will automatically be calculated. For monitor viewing where the exact dimensions of both length and width are unimportant, just the general size of the photo is important you just enter the one that is most relevant. For example posing to a photo sharing site where the maximum size permitted is 600x 800, you can simply enter 800 as the length for photos taken in landscape orienetation and 600 for the height for photos taken in portrait orientation...

Comment #7

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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