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OVF's on SLRs
I must prefer LCD and EVF over OVF on SLRs. On P&S cameras, the LCD is bright, full color, large, and in the last 2 years quick enough to catch movement. On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark. Furthermore, when you take the photo, the mirror blacks out the view. Cameras which have EVFs, dont have mirrors, thus you can quickly pan with the subject..

I am not saying I love EVFs; some are better (Kodak, Olympus) than others, Sony H9 is horrible, Canon S5 IS has too many pixels. However, EVF's are in color, though they are slow at this time(there is maybe a 1/2sec lag). The window viewers on P&S's are the best for viewing how the world is, but they have a parallex error, no info, and no histogram..

SLRs are starting to come around to the world of live-view LCDs; cameras such as Canon 40D, Nikon D300, Olympus E-410, E-510, E-3, Pentax K20D,Sony DSLR-A300, DSLR-A350..

BTW, I got eye strain from looking thru EVFs and OVF too long. Also, if you keep your left eye closed, and look thru an SLR's OVF, you are missing out on whats happening all around you. I get dizzy from all the turns and twists with an SLR trying to capture, focus, and follow the action, or re-focus on another subject behind me. Try it, is it easier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?..

Comments (16)

Is finding a toe-hold on slrs only because it's possible to do so without compromising use of the ovf...

Comment #1

Romphotog wrote:.

I must prefer LCD and EVF over OVF on SLRs. On P&S cameras, the LCDis bright, full color, large, and in the last 2 years quick enough tocatch movement. On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark..

Not sure what DSLR's you've looked through, but neither of mine are greenish not dark. Maybe if were to put some really crappy lens on it, but no problems for me seeing what I need to see. Which includes my metering and exposure information..

Perhaps you needed to adjust the OVF's diopter to match your eye. That can make a huge difference..

Furthermore, when you take the photo, the mirror blacks out the view.Cameras which have EVFs, dont have mirrors, thus you can quickly panwith the subject..

I hardly notice it unless I'm trying to. Never had a problem tracking motion. Tons of people shooting birds in flight, dogs on the run, race cars, atheletes....etc. with SLR's. It must not be slowing many people down..

I am not saying I love EVFs; some are better (Kodak, Olympus) thanothers, Sony H9 is horrible, Canon S5 IS has too many pixels.However, EVF's are in color, though they are slow at this time(thereis maybe a 1/2sec lag)..

You say that likes it's not all that bad. A half second is an eternity when trying to time an action shot..

The window viewers on P&S's are the best forviewing how the world is, but they have a parallex error, no info,and no histogram..

Now you're just being silly. Might as well use a rangefinder with an open rectangle on the top..

SLRs are starting to come around to the world of live-view LCDs;cameras such as Canon 40D, Nikon D300, Olympus E-410, E-510, E-3,Pentax K20D,Sony DSLR-A300, DSLR-A350..

I wouldn't so much say they are coming around as they are adding a niche feature to reign in a few more customers. It's a marketing ploy that appeals to the teaming masses and occasionally holds some value for more experienced shooters in unusual situations..

BTW, I got eye strain from looking thru EVFs and OVF too long. Also,if you keep your left eye closed, and look thru an SLR's OVF, you aremissing out on whats happening all around you..

That's one of the reasons I keep both eyes open. It's just a matter of retraining your brain to work that way. Practice. Also, the eye strain is another indication you didn't have the DSLR's diopter adjusted properly for your eye..

I get dizzy from allthe turns and twists with an SLR trying to capture, focus, and followthe action, or re-focus on another subject behind me. Try it, is iteasier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?.

And this is another reason for using both eyes. It also helps keep you from running into people. *grin*.

Using an LCD is just asking for blurrier photos. Tucking your arms into your body and pressing your eye brow against the viewfinder helps stabilize the camera a bit. With an LCD you'd better hope there is something you can brace against when shooting at a long zoom. Your heartbeat is enough to cause camera shake when held at arms length.Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream..

Comment #2

You just said it a lot quicker than I did. *grin*Chefziggyhttp://www.pbase.com/chefziggy/lecream..

Comment #3

I agree with you, but think you cheated when trying to rationalize why..

Romphotog wrote:.

I must prefer LCD and EVF over OVF on SLRs. On P&S cameras, the LCDis bright, full color, large, and in the last 2 years quick enough tocatch movement..

Most LCDs, regardless of what type camera they are mounted on, are "bright & full color". Lately, most are large. Speed continues to be an issue with all LCDs. It's not that the LCD is slow...the camera that is feeding the info to the LCD is the slow part. This is especially true as light gets dim. The camera has to open the lens and then go to longer exposure times.

But, yes, it's usable..

On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark..

I have never seen one like that?.

Furthermore, when you take the photo, the mirror blacks out the view..

Even on a P&S, the LCD/EVF blacks out during exposure. However, it can be of shorter duration. The first reason that the video stream to the LCD/EVF drops out is that the sensor and processor are madly capturing the data for the pic you just captured. On P&S cameras, this can be quite lengthy, since the processor in most of them are slow (cheap) and they only have one port on the sensor. But a P&S doesn't have mirror flip-flop times added to that black-out. Bottom line: Both types of cameras black out and the length of this black-out is comparable.



Cameras which have EVFs, dont have mirrors, thus you can quickly panwith the subject..

Huh? This makes no sense! Even cameras with mirrors allow you to pan....

I am not saying I love EVFs; some are better (Kodak, Olympus) thanothers, Sony H9 is horrible, Canon S5 IS has too many pixels..

Oh, go ahead and say it. .

You can never have too many pixels on an EVF or LCD. At least not yet....

However, EVF's are in color, though they are slow at this time(thereis maybe a 1/2sec lag)..

Again I wonder what you are talking about? What ISN'T in color? Most LCD/EVF implementations I have examined have a frame rate between 30 Hz and 60 Hz (in good light). A 1/2 sec lag is huge!.

The window viewers on P&S's are the best forviewing how the world is, but they have a parallex error, no info,and no histogram..

Most people hate them!.

SLRs are starting to come around to the world of live-view LCDs;cameras such as Canon 40D, Nikon D300, Olympus E-410, E-510, E-3,Pentax K20D, Sony DSLR-A300, DSLR-A350..

Yes, that's a good sign. But at the moment, the implementations are crude and operation is often clumsy..

BTW, I got eye strain from looking thru EVFs and OVF too long..

This is like the joke about the guy who went to his doctor and said, "Hey, Doc...when I raise my arm up like this...OUCH!...it hurts. What should I do?" .

Also,if you keep your left eye closed, and look thru an SLR's OVF, you aremissing out on whats happening all around you..

If you think THAT'S bad, try keeping BOTH eyes closed!.

I get dizzy from allthe turns and twists with an SLR trying to capture, focus, and followthe action, or re-focus on another subject behind me. Try it, is iteasier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?.

Last time I got dizzy doing that, my Doc said, "Well, don't do that then!".

And he was right. Haven't had dizzyness since I stopped. .

IMO, using an OVF/EVF to capture sports action in daylight is better than using an LCD..

IMO, using an LCD (Live View) to compose a landscape, portrait, or macro shot is better than using an OVF/EVF..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #4

Using the OVF does give a more clear view for focusing. It also is more steady than holding at arms length. I do not have an OVF on my P&S and it works fine but as long as I need to have a high quality view through my DSLR, I will need that good ol penta prism. ..

Comment #5

Romphotog wrote:.

I must prefer LCD and EVF over OVF on SLRs. On P&S cameras, the LCDis bright, full color, large, and in the last 2 years quick enough tocatch movement. On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark.Furthermore, when you take the photo, the mirror blacks out the view.Cameras which have EVFs, dont have mirrors, thus you can quickly panwith the subject..

None of the OVF cameras I've used are greenish and/or dark. I've also never been able to manual focus using an LCD screen, other than 10X live view..

If you think all LV-SLR cameras operate the same way, you haven't used the right ones. If you want fast action usage in LV on a DSLR, you're wanting something that doesn't exist. If you want the best there is, you need to try an E-330. There are always compromises..

I am not saying I love EVFs; some are better (Kodak, Olympus) thanothers, Sony H9 is horrible, Canon S5 IS has too many pixels.However, EVF's are in color, though they are slow at this time(thereis maybe a 1/2sec lag). The window viewers on P&S's are the best forviewing how the world is, but they have a parallex error, no info,and no histogram.SLRs are starting to come around to the world of live-view LCDs;cameras such as Canon 40D, Nikon D300, Olympus E-410, E-510, E-3,Pentax K20D,Sony DSLR-A300, DSLR-A350..

LiveView on DSLRs with optical viewfinders have been here for over 7 years (E-10), and LiveView on DSLRs with OVFs and removable lenses has been here for over 2 years (E-330)..

None of the cameras you mentioned above are even close to pioneering LV..

BTW, I got eye strain from looking thru EVFs and OVF too long. Also,if you keep your left eye closed, and look thru an SLR's OVF, you aremissing out on whats happening all around you. I get dizzy from allthe turns and twists with an SLR trying to capture, focus, and followthe action, or re-focus on another subject behind me. Try it, is iteasier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?.

Easier or faster? It would be easiest with a video camera. You'd get the best results with a DSLR..

Tim'Be the change you wish to see in the world.' -Mahatma Gandhihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/timskis6/..

Comment #6

I'm frequently lamenting the lack of *any* view finder, let alone an OVF..

I have no problem with the OVF in my 5D and 20D bodies. Even the 20D, with it's narrower view, is still bright as usable..

It'll be a sad day if/when DSLR manufacturers do away with the OVF unless they install a substantially high res EVF in it's place and offer features that only an EVF could accommodate, such as:.

* A quick zoom-in for fine manual focusing* A record-review (say, 0.5 to 2 sec) with histogram* Auto-gain when it's dark..

Given enough res, and the features above, an EVF might be useful..

I'm sure I'll think of more......

Http://www.pbase.com/digirob..

Comment #7

Remove the cheap polarizer..

Romphotog wrote:.

On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark...

Comment #8

Chuxter wrote:.

IMO, using an LCD (Live View) to compose a landscape, portrait, ormacro shot is better than using an OVF/EVF..

Macro, something very low or very high, or above heads or obstacles, yes, I agree an LCD is better, especially with a rotating LCD. But portrait? If so, why?..

Comment #9

Timskis6 wrote:.

Romphotog wrote:.

Try it, is iteasier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?.

Easier or faster? It would be easiest with a video camera. You'dget the best results with a DSLR..

Both easier and faster, but not better results as SLRs have bigger sensors..

Try using an SLR in Times Square. See how many people you will bump into. A car might hit you, etc. You need to keep your eyes open, unless in a studio...

Comment #10

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

Remove the cheap polarizer..

Romphotog wrote:.

On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark..

Oh man, I am so dumb! thanks, the world is a much brighter place now...

Comment #11

Romphotog wrote:.

Timskis6 wrote:.

Romphotog wrote:.

Try it, is iteasier to make a 180 with a live LCD or an OVF?.

Easier or faster? It would be easiest with a video camera. You'dget the best results with a DSLR..

Both easier and faster, but not better results as SLRs have biggersensors..

Try using an SLR in Times Square. See how many people you will bumpinto. A car might hit you, etc. You need to keep your eyes open,unless in a studio..

I've used a DSLR both in Time Square and in downtown Ho Chi Minh City - and I survived both to tell the story. I'm not sure why you think you can't have peripheral vision when taking a photograph. They do make lenses with as wide a FOV as your eyesight..

Tim'Be the change you wish to see in the world.' -Mahatma Gandhihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/timskis6/..

Comment #12

Romphotog wrote:.

On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark..

What?! Where did you find such OVF?.

Edvinas..

Comment #13

Timskis6 wrote:.

Romphotog wrote:.

Catch movement. On SLRs, the OVF's are greenish and dark..

None of the OVF cameras I've used are greenish and/or dark..

As for not seeing green and dark OVF, I will go back to B&H to check out DSLRs once again. If anyone wants to join me there for a comparison of OVF and EVF, let me know when..

PS: too bad heavy rain today as there is a photo meetup at B&H...

Comment #14

Romphotog wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

IMO, using an LCD (Live View) to compose a landscape, portrait, ormacro shot is better than using an OVF/EVF..

Macro, something very low or very high, or above heads or obstacles,yes, I agree an LCD is better, especially with a rotating LCD. Butportrait? If so, why?.

Because you, the master photographer, can observe the subject much better than with your head under the cape. Read about how all the really great portrait artists did it...they focused with the ground glass...then put the film in...then by standing BESIDE the camera, they talked with the subject and squeezed the bulb when the moment was right..

The advent of digital photography has not changed the need for this much. You can set the camera up on a tripod, select LV mode, focus and frame, and then concentrate on the subject. It's still possible to glance at the LCD occasionally (mostly to verify framing). It just works better this way....

But even w/o LV, I'd still ignore the OVF after focusing and framing and observe the subject for those great expression moments..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #15

Romphotog wrote:.

As for not seeing green and dark OVF, I will go back to B&H to checkout DSLRs once again. If anyone wants to join me there for acomparison of OVF and EVF, let me know when..

PS: too bad heavy rain today as there is a photo meetup at B&H..

Oh, right, you don't even have an experience with a SLR... Nevertheless you make such drastic statements. Well, well....

Edvinas..

Comment #16

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