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Over and Under Exposed
I shot a handful of products today in a light tent, and on a tripod in P mode without a flash. Some shots came out just right, while other shots came out significantly darker looking without making any changes to either the camera or the light. I noticed if I pressed the shutter down longer, the shot came out better..

So my questions are:Do you need to hold the shutter longer?Was there enough light?Is there a way to get the perfect exposure setting in a manual mode?.

The ones that shot right where perfect for me. No noise, great color, in focus, and clear...

Comments (39)

Thurnau wrote:.

I shot a handful of products today in a light tent, and on a tripodin P mode without a flash. Some shots came out just right, whileother shots came out significantly darker looking without making anychanges to either the camera or the light. I noticed if I pressed theshutter down longer, the shot came out better..

I think you have had an epiphany. The shutter release is a strange and wonderful thing. It can control focus and exposure (I know that you only noticed the effect on exposure, but that's a start)..

So my questions are:Do you need to hold the shutter longer?.

You need to hold the shutter release 1/2 way down (it's called half-press for some reason) until the little green dot (I think they are all green dots?) glows and then (and only then) press the shutter release fully down. You don't need to hold it down fully..

Was there enough light?.

Probably, since you said SOME of the pix were properly exposed. Hey...you were there. Tell us about the lighting before asking us if it was adequate. What do we know?.

Is there a way to get the perfect exposure setting in a manual mode?.

Sure. More on that farther down....

The ones that shot right where perfect for me. No noise, great color,in focus, and clear..

That's one way of getting good results: Just blunder around and take lots of pix...some may come out OK. If you are going to adopt this approach, you should trade in your camera (what ever it is) for a D3 and a huge memory card and run around shooting at 9 FPS...or is it 11 FPS?.

Another novel approach is to understand what the camera needs from you. Most cameras are dumber than their masters and need guidance. They appreciate being told what to focus on, what subject(s) to use to set the exposure, you know...simple stuff like that. It also helps to set limits for the camera. Without limits, they often (stupidly) use long exposure times (which results in motion blur), wide apertures (which results in very shallow DOF), high sensitivity settings (which produce lots of noise). They are like children that way..

If you would post 2 pix...one good...one bad...and be sure that the EXIF data is intact...I'm sure we could make better guesses about why some of your pix were overexposed. It could be something as simple as you used spot AF and failed to put that spot on the bright part of the subject? In a controlled environment like you describe, it might be good to measure the lighting (with the camera) and then use M-mode to maintain the correct exposure. Some photographers look at the pix they take on the LCD on the back to judge whether the exposure and focus is right before they go forward and take more pix. Some have even found the button(s) that show the "histogram" which is allegedly a good way to check exposure. But what do I know?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #1

Thurnau wrote:.

I shot a handful of products today in a light tent, and on a tripodin P mode without a flash. Some shots came out just right, whileother shots came out significantly darker looking without making anychanges to either the camera or the light..

Did the darker/underexposed shots, happen to be of lighter toned/colored products?And the shots that came out just right, were they noticebly darker objects?..

Comment #2

I understand pressing the shutter halfway down to focus first. I always do that; I thought that was common knowledge. I should have been more descriptive..

Whether it was just right, or too dark the item never changed. The camera was still on the tripod..

I noticed that if I pressed the shutter down for a longer time it was exposed properly, and if I just pressed it and let it go the image was too dark..

As a result I had to change my camera setting to prevent it from continuous shooting. I would love to post some images later today when I get to go back to work. I brought my Camera home, but forgot my SD card in my card reader...

Comment #3

Thurnau wrote:.

I understand pressing the shutter halfway down to focus first. Ialways do that; I thought that was common knowledge. I should havebeen more descriptive..

This is the beginners forum. LOTS of beginners don't know about that. Sorry...I was just trying to be thorough..

Whether it was just right, or too dark the item never changed. Thecamera was still on the tripod..

I noticed that if I pressed the shutter down for a longer time it wasexposed properly, and if I just pressed it and let it go the imagewas too dark..

As a result I had to change my camera setting to prevent it fromcontinuous shooting..

Hmmm... You failed to tell us you were "shooting continuously". I had assumed you were taking one-shot-at-a-time. What does that term mean to you?.

If you had previously selected the Cl or Ch release mode, then holding the shutter release down longer would result in more exposures. Are you saying that the first exposure of a burst is under exposed and the last was exposed properly?.

If you has previously selected Continuous AF, I can't see that anything would happen since the subject is not moving..

What other kind of "continuous" mode is there?.

I would love to post some images later todaywhen I get to go back to work. I brought my Camera home, but forgotmy SD card in my card reader..

I look forward to seing pix! It's a mystery..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #4

I was taking one shot at a time. It is a still item, and I am on a tripod. My camera has a setting to allow continuous shooting. If you press and hold the shutter, my camera takes 3 shots per second, or so it says. If I held the shutter long enough the pic was beautiful, and If I held it too long I got more images than I needed which were under exposed. So after I realized it I disabled the feature, and still if I did a quick press the image came out underexposed and if I held it longer the shot came out right.



Pressing quickly could also give an underexposed shot..

For overexposed my camera didn't do it to me. However when I paid a photographer he even told me that his shots came out a tad bit overexposed. I played with brightness and contrast to get them to look right...

Comment #5

Thurnau wrote:.

(snip).

.......... if I did a quick press the image came out underexposed and if Iheld it longer the shot came out right. My specific problem is why amI getting underexposed shots and nice shots without moving thecamera, and how do I learn to master it in a controlled environment..

Pressing quickly could also give an underexposed shot..

Forgive me asking, but could your shutter speed be set to 'B' by any chance??Regards,Baz..

Comment #6

Built-in camera meters evaluate tonal vales of the scene. Same background lighting but lighter object in foreground will cause the meter to say "that subject is too bright, I better make it darker", and vice versa for darker subjects turning out lighter in tone..

Once you hit the right shutter speed and f/stop for one subject, switch to manual with the same settings so that the exposure is consistent regardless of light or dark subjects..

Bottom line: auto-exposure metering tries to set an exposure for some average or common lighting scenarios. One you change subjects or backgrounds, it changes the lighting that is compared to the "average" situation. Neither very bright nor very dark subjects can be "average", by definition..

See:.

Http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-metering.htm.

Thurnau wrote:.

I shot a handful of products today in a light tent, and on a tripodin P mode without a flash. Some shots came out just right, whileother shots came out significantly darker looking without making anychanges to either the camera or the light. I noticed if I pressed theshutter down longer, the shot came out better..

So my questions are:Do you need to hold the shutter longer?Was there enough light?Is there a way to get the perfect exposure setting in a manual mode?.

The ones that shot right where perfect for me. No noise, great color,in focus, and clear..

Galleries: http://www.dheller.net.

Many folks on dpreview.com list their equipment here, but don't list any links to their images. Do they collect equipment? Or take pictures?..

Comment #7

It looks like If I took a few shots of the same item I have a perfect Light, Medium, and Dark exposures lol. I remember that was a setting, but I remembered it to be more automatic such as it would take 3 pics without pressing the shutter 3 times. I didn't see the pattern because I was baffled by the shutter. Pics are soon to come...

Comment #8

Light or perfect.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Medium or dark.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Too dark.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #9

From the EXIF data, the exposures are what the results indicate. They are all at f/3.3, but exposures are 1/40, 1/80, and 1/160. Three shots bracketed by one f/stop each. I don't see how this can be caused by how long you hold the shutter release..

DavidDallas, TX..

Comment #10

When shooting product, you are best in manual focus. The product isn't going anywhere and you are fully in control of what is happening so why autofocus?.

I'm starting to develop a rant against autofocus. Clearly focusing on auto can be a good thing, even better if you wear glasses. But you don't always need autofocus, in fact autofocus can be a pain in some circumstances like macro photography..

Studio photography is another example of turning the autofocus off. If the subject is sitting still, you might want to fiddle with focus and see what looks best, kind of like bracketing a shot for exposure..

There is a reason there is a little lever to turn the autofocus off, why not find out what you can do in manual focus.Rationally I have no hope, irrationally I believe in miracles.Joni Mitchell..

Comment #11

I think I was confused. I thought the pattern was the shutter. I looks like the shutter itself was the pattern..

Looking at all the shots from that day they are almost all in this pattern. I didn't notice it earlier because my card reader is so slow. I plugged my camera in, and it shows up on the screen incredibly fast in comparison...

Comment #12

Thurnau wrote:.

I think I was confused. I thought the pattern was the shutter. Ilooks like the shutter itself was the pattern..

I have no clue what you were trying to say in that last sentence?.

I also immediately noticed the 1f-stop pattern to your 3 pix. I also noted that the EXIF says that they were +1, 0, and -1 EV?.

Question: did you vary the Exposure compensation?Question: did you tell the camera to "bracket" the exposure?.

It's probably the latter...ie, you somehow got the camera setup to bracket the exposure..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #13

Thurnau wrote:.

I think I was confused. I thought the pattern was the shutter. Ilooks like the shutter itself was the pattern.Looking at all the shots from that day they are almost all in thispattern. I didn't notice it earlier because my card reader is soslow. I plugged my camera in, and it shows up on the screenincredibly fast in comparison..

You have the camera set for continuous shooting and exposure bracketing, with a bracketing compensation of +/- 1EV. So each time you press the shutter, the camera takes three shots, one stop underexposed, as metered, and one stop overexposed. I'm not sure offhand which order they are taken in, but that will be in the manual if you want to know. I'm not just guessing here - the information is in the 'MakerNotes' in the EXIF data...

Comment #14

Thanks guys. I had the bracketing button on. It was on the left side of the camera near the lens mount. I didn't see it when I was trying to troubleshoot...

Comment #15

So what is the first step to learn a perfect exposure outside of the P or auto setting?.

Does a gray card do something? Or is a light meter useful? Is the way only trial and error? What is your trick to get it right?..

Comment #16

Thurnau wrote:.

I shot a handful of products today in a light tent, and on a tripodin P mode without a flash. Some shots came out just right, whileother shots came out significantly darker looking without making anychanges to either the camera or the light. I noticed if I pressed theshutter down longer, the shot came out better..

This is VERY SIMPLE and BASIC !!!.

You said you were not using flash. Therefore you will require a LONG exposure to get proper-exposure..

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for the required time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a full SECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first when the exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You have to keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photo every time..

You also do NOT want to be on "continuous" shooting..

AND now that I have seen your photos, the background is WHITE..

THEREFORE you will have to use a +1 or +2 (maybe even +3 depending on "how" white/bright/shiny the subject is)..

It will require some experimenting to see which "+" setting is best. (+1 appears to be enough from your bracketing example).

BUT ... remember that you still must keep the shutter-button depressed long enough for a "complete" exposure, (second click)..

So my questions are:Do you need to hold the shutter longer?Was there enough light?Is there a way to get the perfect exposure setting in a manual mode?.

The ones that shot right where perfect for me. No noise, great color,in focus, and clear..

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #17

JoePhoto wrote:.

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for therequired time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a fullSECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first whenthe exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You haveto keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photoevery time..

Absolute rubbish...

Comment #18

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for therequired time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a fullSECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first whenthe exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You haveto keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photoevery time..

Absolute rubbish..

Define "rubbish" ??? (make that define "absolute" rubbish ???).

He said "no-flash" ... but he did not say how much/bright his light source is. It is a P&S (with relatively slow lens). It was a "white" subject, thus needing a slight over-exposure, (+1 or +2)..

HOW LONG do you suggest the exposure time may be ???.

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #19

JoePhoto wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for therequired time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a fullSECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first whenthe exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You haveto keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photoevery time..

Absolute rubbish..

Define "rubbish" ??? (make that define "absolute" rubbish ???).

Are you serious? Since when did you have to hold down the shutter during an automatic exposure?.

Go and read your manual Joe...

Comment #20

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for therequired time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a fullSECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first whenthe exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You haveto keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photoevery time..

Absolute rubbish..

Define "rubbish" ??? (make that define "absolute" rubbish ???).

Are you serious? Since when did you have to hold down the shutterduring an automatic exposure?.

Go and read your manual Joe..

Maybe your camera is different, (indeed ALL cameras may be different), but MOST cameras I have used, (and I have used 100's in my 49 years of pro-photography) DO require you to hold the button down long enough to complete the exposure..

Releasing it pre-maturely will indeed stop the exposure on MOST (but indeed not all) cameras..

(Albeit, I just tested it with a Minolta A2, and YOU are correct, once you begin the exposure, the exposure DOES CONTINUE if you remove finger.).

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #21

Joe.......I think maybe the Rubbish part was pointed at where you stated......(You have to hold the release down till the second click)The camera if set properly... would determine the length of exposure.... right?.

If thats the case,then you would trigger the photo,with the shutter button,and the camera would shut down the shot at the correct time.....I do not think that holding the shutter release down,would be required..........Wait........don't yell at me yet......

It seems you were probably addressing the shutter release,and describing the holding down the button,as if the whole shot were to be manual.........

In which case yes........hold the shutter release.....till you fill it's long enough....Most P&S dont have this feature....As a SLR....or a DSLR would.....You have to set the camera,for letting it decide the exposure time/length....Correct?????In this case then,holding the shutter release down,certainly isn't necessary..

Of course.......if the camera set for auto exposure,were to determine that a shot need (for instance) a 1sec exposure.......then yes you would hear two clicks....However.the camera being set to auto exposure.......will do the two clicks....

Open..and..close .... with just a single trip of the shutter release... holding it down isn't necessary........

I know I'm sounding silly pointing out,the basic of basics.....As to functionality..

However.....I think the user was saying he was shooting as in auto exposure mode..... hence no holding the shutter.... hence Rubbish.........

Comment #22

Well.of course it continues........if you are in auto exposure mode.......hence the word (auto) .........

If in auto exposure mode,the camera needs a two sec exposure,it will do two seconds,regardless of you holding the shutter release........

If in full manual mode........you would indeed have to hold the shutter release down to get a longer exposure.........

Comment #23

Hamx15 wrote:.

Joe.......I think maybe the Rubbish part was pointed at where youstated......(You have to hold the release down till the second click)The camera if set properly... would determine the length ofexposure.... right?If thats the case,then you would trigger the photo,with the shutterbutton,and the camera would shut down the shot at the correcttime.....I do not think that holding the shutter release down,would berequired..........Wait........don't yell at me yet.....It seems you were probably addressing the shutter release,anddescribing the holding down the button,as if the whole shot were tobe manual........In which case yes........hold the shutter release.....till you fillit's long enough....Most P&S dont have this feature....As a SLR....or a DSLR would.....You have to set the camera,for letting it decide the exposuretime/length....Correct?????In this case then,holding the shutter release down,certainly isn'tnecessary.Of course.......if the camera set for auto exposure,were to determinethat a shot need (for instance) a 1sec exposure.......then yes youwould hear two clicks....However.the camera being set to auto exposure.......will do the twoclicks...Open..and..close .... with just a single trip of the shutterrelease... holding it down isn't necessary.......I know I'm sounding silly pointing out,the basic of basics.....As tofunctionality.However.....I think the user was saying he was shooting as in autoexposure mode..... hence no holding the shutter....



I have admitted that I am WRONG. (at least regards to my own Minolta A2).

I ran a test on my A2, and indeed the exposure "locks" on for the required time, even if the finger is removed..

However .... I have seen (many) cameras in the past that did not work that way. In those cases, removing the finger before the exposure had (auto) completed would indeed prematurely stop the exposure. (albeit, I admit I have less experience with "newer" cameras).

So I stand CORRECTED !!! .... (me sorry).

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #24

JoePhoto wrote:.

I ran a test on my A2, and indeed the exposure "locks" on for therequired time, even if the finger is removed..

However .... I have seen (many) cameras in the past that did not workthat way. In those cases, removing the finger before the exposurehad (auto) completed would indeed prematurely stop the exposure.(albeit, I admit I have less experience with "newer" cameras).

Well, my experience is limited to my own cameras and a few others - I don't have the breadth of experience of someone who works in a camera shop for instance. But I have never seen a camera which works the way you describe, and nor could I imagine one being designed that way, it wouldn't make sense..

Bulb mode does work that way of course, but it's not an automatic exposure so not pertinent to this discussion. Perhaps that is causing confusion..

Another point of possible confusion is that on my 400D, the three shots of a bracketed exposure are only taken in one shutter press if the camera is in continuous shooting mode and the shutter is held down long enough for all three exposures. Strictly speaking that would be until the shutter is opened for the third time - if these are long bracketed exposures it wouldn't be necessary to wait until the third exposure has completed. This has some relevance to the OP's question, because it means that with the camera inadvertently set to AEB, but not continuous shooting, it would appear to work normally but the exposures would alternate between 0, -1 and +1 EC. Similarly if the camera is in continuous mode but the shutter is not held down. The 400D has a huge flashing symbol on the LCD screen which would make it very difficult to get this wrong - maybe the OP's Nikon D80 doesn't make it quite so obvious..

I am fairly sure that my old Fuji S602Zoom needed only a quick stab at the shutter to take all three bracketed shots, but I no longer have it so I can't check. However it sounds like the OP's Nikon does behave the same way as my Canon...

Comment #25

Thurnau wrote:.

So what is the first step to learn a perfect exposure outside of theP or auto setting?Does a gray card do something? Or is a light meter useful? Is the wayonly trial and error? What is your trick to get it right?.

I do quite a bit of tabletop pack shot photography as it happens. My technique is very simple - take a quick shot in Av mode, possibly with a guess at how much exposure compensation might be needed, and see how far out it is. Then I switch to manual using the settings I have established..

I usually work tethered to the PC so I can see the results on my calibrated screen instantaneously. This is much better than using the histogram alone..

If I can't work tethered, I will often bracket exposures to be sure of getting a good one. This kind of work often involves extremes of colour and contrast, where 1/3 stop can make or break a shot..

Grey cards don't work as well as you might expect. They can only give you a theoretically 'correct' exposure - in practice, the best exposure for a black bottle and a white bottle are often different. For the same reason I have never felt inclined to use an incident light meter. The experienced wedding photographer can use a meter to get a perfect exposure of a white dress in all weathers, using a film camera with no histogram to guide him. I've never learned that skill - no reason to...

Comment #26

.....no reason to be sorry.......I wasn't trying to correct ..... I just meant to point out....Anyway....with such as your A2 ....and other SLR's and DSLR's ........

The different companies have there own way of setting the priorities within the workings.Most have Auto Exposure option,some have nothing but manual.....Some have Exposure and Shutter as individual Auto options.And then theres the Full Auto Option..... Which I never use......

It leaves ya with never knowing if the camera is gonna go with exposure or shutter asprimary control function on any one shot......

Actually I prefer Auto Focus,and Auto Shutter combination... That way I know the Exposure setting will remain as I have set it.....

For action shots I prefer Auto Exposure .... then the shutter speed will remain as set.For compacts of course you never have all these options..Now with all that said......

You will definitely have to hold the shutter button down,if you are going to set the camera to manual shutter.....

In which case the shutter open duration is now in the users hands,and will/would require the shutter button to be held in place for what ever amount of time...

I never choose this means due to the fact that I hardly ever use a tripod,and holding the shutter open manually,then releasing,causes way too much movement....Instead.....I opt for a preset duration dialed in,on the shutter open time....then one click and the camera does the rest.....

If I need a ten sec exposure,I dial in 10,and push the release....Although that would require a tripod....and in those cases I normally use a 11" type screw in wired remote shutter release......It keeps you from actually having to touch the camera body to trigger the shutter..

Although todays Digital cameras .....even DSLR's,most don't come with the threaded receptacle on the shutter release...... Why not....???? Well in a few short words......

Because the Digital camera industry as a whole is engineered by Martians .... Martians with small tiny little fingers...... About the size of the average third grader.....Not to mention....now that I'm ranting........ They are all garbage...Hit and Miss garbage ..... (well maybe we'll get it right next time).

As far as I'm concerned,if your gonna talk digital,then the new model should be paid for as just a upgrade....The whole sales feature of digital,is to never get it right....Hence the need for the new model.........The whole world never needed anything digital.It was handy for calculation functions........Analog is real.... Analog is all evident chemistry,and mechanics.Digital is nothing but fake analog,meant to be cheap and disposable..

The only cost representative of digital,is what someone is willing to pay in the name of technology.....When the raw products in a $8,000 DSLR aint $30 worth.So someone...one day....ran out side and said..."Hey Look what I can do".

All of a sudden,it was worth a fortune....Digital....is nothing more than a Carnival routine..

It won't last for ever ..... sooner or later,the digital world as we know it will end.Then the crying of the helpless will commence.When the multitudes scream for going back to the way it was,with analog.....Guess what... the analog version,takes real brains.Real calculated exactness.Not digital guess work,that's close enough for the moment to turn out a fake.The real brains and knowhow have sense long gone.......Those trained fields of expertize for the most part no longer exist..

Also there are those that are running as fast as they can to digitize all of the written archives,and text material,and it will be lost as well.....

At the push of one button.....everything digital can be shut down,and most all memory wiped.... BangPHeeeeewwwwwwww was all that necessary ?????.

No...but I enjoyed it.So don't be sorry .... I'm sorry enough for the both of us..

Don't get me wrong,I aint out to save the world,I'm here for the ride just like everyone else... I got no better place to go.I'm sometimes startled at the effects of brain numbing simplicity...........

Comment #27

I used a Nikon D80 with a kit lens or a micro lens..

3 fluorescent bulbs. One on the right side and close to the tent, one on the left and slightly further away, and the last one overhead to give the background some light. All ceiling lights were turned off to keep the light source the same. I did a custom white balance setting with an expodisk. I think the lights used with the kit are just not bright enough. I can do +EV to get the right exposure, but exactly how do I know when it is accurate?.

For white balance I have a scientific way of getting it right.For my lighting I have a pattern to get it right, but my lighting is rubbish:).

The camera gets very clear and noise free images, so much better than 3 p&s's I used in the past..

For EV I know how to use it, I just don't know where perfect is. All of my product pics are against a white background, and I cut them out in photoshop...

Comment #28

Sorry guys, I had no idea when I posted that the thread reached the 2nd page overnight!.

I will read up to see if you already answered my questions...

Comment #29

The New Point and shoot from NIKON , the D80. Also, what you said previously is indeed totallly retarded..

JoePhoto wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

You do have to keep the shutter depressed long enough for therequired time for proper exposure. (It could be longer than a fullSECOND or even TWO seconds or more.).

Without flash, (in low light), you will hear "two" clicks, first whenthe exposure "starts", and then another when it finishes. You haveto keep the shutter-button depressed until after the second click..

Releasing it prematurely will give you a dark (under-exposed) photoevery time..

Absolute rubbish..

Define "rubbish" ??? (make that define "absolute" rubbish ???).

He said "no-flash" ... but he did not say how much/bright his lightsource is. It is a P&S (with relatively slow lens). It was a"white" subject, thus needing a slight over-exposure, (+1 or +2)..

HOW LONG do you suggest the exposure time may be ???.

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #30

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Hamx15 wrote:.

Joe.......I think maybe the Rubbish part was pointed at where youstated......(You have to hold the release down till the second click)The camera if set properly... would determine the length ofexposure.... right?If thats the case,then you would trigger the photo,with the shutterbutton,and the camera would shut down the shot at the correcttime.....I do not think that holding the shutter release down,would berequired..........Wait........don't yell at me yet.....It seems you were probably addressing the shutter release,anddescribing the holding down the button,as if the whole shot were tobe manual........In which case yes........hold the shutter release.....till you fillit's long enough....Most P&S dont have this feature....As a SLR....or a DSLR would.....You have to set the camera,for letting it decide the exposuretime/length....Correct?????In this case then,holding the shutter release down,certainly isn'tnecessary.Of course.......if the camera set for auto exposure,were to determinethat a shot need (for instance) a 1sec exposure.......then yes youwould hear two clicks....However.the camera being set to auto exposure.......will do the twoclicks...Open..and..close .... with just a single trip of the shutterrelease... holding it down isn't necessary.......I know I'm sounding silly pointing out,the basic of basics.....As tofunctionality.However.....I think the user was saying he was shooting as in autoexposure mode..... hence no holding the shutter.... henceRubbish.........

Comment #31

What you are doing sounds fine. The lighting/exposure are correct when the white parts of the packaging are somewhere around 80-95% brightness - they will vary by at least that much. Make sure it never goes over about 97%..

There is an old adage from film photography - expose for the shadows, process for the highlights. But with digital the opposite is true. The highlights need to be correctly exposed, and if that means your shadow areas are not dark enough you can do a Levels adjustment in Photoshop and that will give great results. Best of all, shoot RAW, expose for best highlight detail and adjust the shadows in the RAW converter...

Comment #32

I have not read all the thread, and apologize for that..

But if the objects you photographed were different colors, and different sizes (meaning more or less of the background was in the shot) the explanation is easy..

P for program picks a shutter speed and aperture based on what the light meter sees..

Even if the lighting remains the same, a darker object makes the meter set a longer/wider aperture exposure, and a lighter object means a faster shutter speed and smaller aperture, and a middle-colored/middle toned object means a bang-on exposure..

Can you find exposure info for your shots? Perhaps just put the card back in the camera and revciew them there..

Do the exposure settings change from shot to shot?.

If so, that's the explanation..

Solution? Set the camera on manual, put a mid-toned, mid colored object int he tent, and take a test shot. Adjust exposure as necessary, and then leave this for every other picture, as long as the lighting remains constant..

BAK..

Comment #33

From....Company to Company....... I couldn't say....... I've owned two diff SLR's.So my personal experience is limited..

With that said however.. I know of bracketing to be one way only. via exposure,and all (usually) three are shot consecutively,with one press of the shutter release....No need to hold it down.......You told it what to do,and with the wave of the green flag,that's what happens..There's no stopping the three shots once triggered.......

The required shutter duration for proper exposure,would be set as auto (I'm assuming) ........... I have actually never captured any bracketed shots.Due to the fact that all of my cameras that could preform this act,were SLR's...I always figured I didn't won't to waste the film.......So I've never actually set up the bracketing mode.....

In the photos shown,I would say it was apparent that auto bracketing,was being used....Only apparently the shots were done manually.This is neat ..... the obvious choice to have all three shots bracketed exposure wise,and give the user the option to pause between shots....... I like that.....

Especially if you don't have the ability to twist the barrel one f stop,or may forget.I'll say I didn't have knowledge of this ability..... It's cool with me though.I figure any need for bracketing (in my case) would be all three at once...

Comment #34

Hey....This is simple......... You know where perfect is..... When you see it........Only in the eyes of the beholder is there an absolute to perfection..

If you mean to say.....you see shots that you would say were perfect,then you shoot to match what you saw..

If you want to standardize photo lighting perfection....... You start with the simple tool.....called a light meter..........

However now you get into a more complicated area of photography,and expecting a common result......

Demonstrated as the ability to be repetitively accurate as to your intentional outcome lighting wise..... This is a staged photo more or less.... usually augmented with artificial lighting.Shooting with all natural lighting isn't the best road to what you may feel is perfection.... It is a road to accurate photography naturally speaking..

If you are demanding results (as per lighting) I would suggest external flash be involved......

Again though .... even external flash,can only be viewed as the way the photographer wanted the scene........ You have contrast issues.....temperature issues..... (lighting type,and intensity) I mean..

If you want to go with natural lighting.....forget the flash,and light meter stuff..

Then I suggest.....You pick the shutter speed,if your gonna be using a tripod,1/250 is good stuff.If hand held 1/500.Set the camera to auto exposure,with auto bracket default..

This will usually be -1 and +1 f stop,either side of what the camera sees as best.Then press the little doo hickey,known as the shutter release.....

This way you'll just about be guaranteed that one of the shots will be to your liking.....Albeit....considering other things,such as focus,let the camera do it's thing....as far as exposure goes.Whewwwwww I'm nearly exhausted ....... and havent taken a single shot yet.....

Comment #35

Hamx15 wrote:.

From....Company to Company....... I couldn't say....... I've ownedtwo diff SLR's..

[snip].

There's no stopping the three shots once triggered.......

Nope, my Canon definitely doesn't behave that way, but as I said I think my Fuji did..

I'm not sure which I prefer, but since it is better technique to press and hold the shutter - less camera shake - it doesn't much matter in practice...

Comment #36

BAK wrote:.

I have not read all the thread, and apologize for that..

I'm guilty of that too from time to time, so I won't criticise you for that. But on this occasion it's a pity you didn't, since the solution was established yesterday....

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=26953247..

Comment #37

Hamx15 wrote:.

Well.of course it continues........if you are in auto exposuremode.......hence the word (auto) ........If in auto exposure mode,the camera needs a two sec exposure,it willdo two seconds,regardless of you holding the shutter release.......If in full manual mode........you would indeed have to hold theshutter release down to get a longer exposure........

I agree with Steve on this one. You guys are quite wrong. Don't RTFM, just try it. I just did this with my D300 and R1...M-mode...2 sec...with both cameras exposure proceeded correctly even when I removed my finger from the shutter release button prematurely..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #38

Use the M mode and select the appropriate exposure. With P mode the exposure metering may change..

Take a photo that is OK and then copy the settings (ISO speed, shutter speed, f-stop) into M mode.Also you could make a custom WB.VictorBucuresti, Romaniahttp://s106.photobucket.com/albums/m268/victor_petcu/http://picasaweb.google.com/teodor.nitica/..

Comment #39

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