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Number of shots in a panorama to 'equal' human peripheral vision?
I'm just curious if anyone here know approximately how many shots are required for a panorama to "equal" that of human peripheral vision? Is it possible to determine this if the focal length of the lense is known such as 38mm and 56mm?..

Comments (15)

Http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/image-projections.htm.

There is a calculator here. What you're looking for is 120 degrees horizontal in the answer box...

Comment #1

Keep in mind that having the fields of the adjacent shots exactly match up is NOT the game here. As a practical matter these shots need to overlap quite a bit for the "stitch" program to line up an good match. For example: say the lens has a field 50 deg wide. Then you would need a shot every 35 deg (or so) to get good matching. Which results in more shots than every 50 deg..

Kelly Cook..

Comment #2

Wmsson wrote:.

Http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/image-projections.htmThere is a calculator here. What you're looking for is 120 degreeshorizontal in the answer box..

Hi,.

If you can only see 120 then you are losing your peripheral vision..

Regards, David..

Comment #3

The 120degrees refers to the direct vision of the eye, not peripheral vision. the human does pickup images beyond the 120degree mark but it is not what forms the image on the brain. outside of the 120degree mark the brain is aware of items but you are not really seeing it...

Comment #4

I shoot 120degree panos. I use 7 shots to do the 120degrees. this is with a 20mm lens in portrait mode on a 1.5crop dslr. there is an overlap of about 33degrees per shot...

Comment #5

GaryDeM wrote:.

The 120degrees refers to the direct vision of the eye, not peripheralvision. the human does pickup images beyond the 120degree mark but itis not what forms the image on the brain. outside of the 120degreemark the brain is aware of items but you are not really seeing it..

Human eyes are connected to human brains, which do things cameras don't. When you look at a scene, you'll typically move your eyes around, taking in about a 180 degree view. Such an image can't be taken by any rectilinear lens, nor can it be printed on a flat surface..

What you can do is make a multi-exposure panorama and display it on a cylindrical surface. Or, if you really don't mind hard work and expense, make a 360 degree panorama and display it on a spherical surface...

Comment #6

GaryDeM wrote:.

The 120degrees refers to the direct vision of the eye, not peripheralvision. the human does pickup images beyond the 120degree mark but itis not what forms the image on the brain. outside of the 120degreemark the brain is aware of items but you are not really seeing it..

Hi,.

But the OP was about " ...the shots required for a panorama to "equal" that of human peripheral vision?" and that was why I commented..

I've seen figures quoted of 230, 180 and 160 and my own experiments with LED's in dark room suggests more than 180 but what the tolerances are (Meaning 5 or what?) for that figure I just do not know. Someone must know and the figure for the focal length of the eye. Plastic lenses are used in cataract replacement but what these are is difficult to find - and I assume some amount of correction for short and long sight is built into them..

Regards, David..

Comment #7

Hi,.

For panoramas I assume that only the middle third will be used. Takes more shots if you use 35 to 500 mm (in 35 mm film terms) but no/less problems with edge distortion, which screws up some software..

Regards, David..

Comment #8

Guys, I'm kinda confused based on the responses here. I'm guessing that it's impractical to strive to get a panorama to "equal" what I can see with my own eyes then?..

Comment #9

I do a lot of panoramas (see site below). I tend to shoot around 35 mm on a 1.3 crop camera or about 45 mm equivalent. I print the panos with a print surface of 10 inches vertically and as long as necessary. I find that if I hold the pano about 12-15 inches from my eyes wrapped around my head, I reasonable reproduce the perspective I had when I shot the pano. As far as peripheral vision is concerned, 180 degrees (about 42 inches wide) seems to work very well to provide the correct impression. If I get into it, I can turn my head to different parts of the pano and it still works.

Hope this helps.PS. I stitch manually so I use an overlap of about 50% when I shoot.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #10

For your pano it is going to depend on whether you wish to see the main section of what the eye sees; this is 120degrees. beyond this to 180degrees the eye is aware of movement and colors tone contrast changes but you are not really seeing any objects clearly. not like the main 120degrees..

For myself I shoot 120 panos, this is what I clearly see when I look at a scene. for the 120degrees I shoot 7shots with a 20mm lens on a 1.5 crop dslr. this also has a 33% overlap in all shots. if a switch to 35 or 50mm lens, I have been using 13shots. note you should know that the higher you go in your mm lens the more the resulting pano changes from a rectangle to a hotdog to a spagetti noodle shape. the objects in the view get bigger but the entire image sacrifices vertical view.

And puts a bigger starin on your pc to make pano in your software...

Comment #11

Leon Wittwer wrote:.

I do a lot of panoramas (see site below). I tend to shoot around 35mm on a 1.3 crop camera or about 45 mm equivalent. I print the panoswith a print surface of 10 inches vertically and as long asnecessary. I find that if I hold the pano about 12-15 inches from myeyes wrapped around my head, I reasonable reproduce the perspective Ihad when I shot the pano. As far as peripheral vision is concerned,180 degrees (about 42 inches wide) seems to work very well to providethe correct impression. If I get into it, I can turn my head todifferent parts of the pano and it still works.

Hope this helps.PS. I stitch manually so I use an overlap of about 50% when I shoot.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm.

Are you using any specific Pano gear to help you get the exact measurements right? How many shots do you usually take then? I'm not exactly sure if I'll go ahead and print out all the panoramas. I was thinking of just putting it up on the web for my own pleasure...

Comment #12

GaryDeM wrote:.

For your pano it is going to depend on whether you wish to see themain section of what the eye sees; this is 120degrees. beyond this to180degrees the eye is aware of movement and colors tone contrastchanges but you are not really seeing any objects clearly. not likethe main 120degrees..

For myself I shoot 120 panos, this is what I clearly see when I lookat a scene. for the 120degrees I shoot 7shots with a 20mm lens on a1.5 crop dslr. this also has a 33% overlap in all shots. if a switchto 35 or 50mm lens, I have been using 13shots. note you should knowthat the higher you go in your mm lens the more the resulting panochanges from a rectangle to a hotdog to a spagetti noodle shape. theobjects in the view get bigger but the entire image sacrificesvertical view.

And puts a biggerstarin on your pc to make pano in your software..

I'm most likely going to be setting my lense (17-40mm f/4 L on a XTI) to 24mm or 35mm on the lens (38.4mm or 56mm eqivalent on a 35mm camera). I'm guessing I'll probably need about 8 or 9 images with a 33% overlap?..

Comment #13

The 8-9 shots for a 120degree pano sounds like a good starting point..

If you have a second person available you can do what I do. that tell the person to walk out 100ft and stand still, put the left or right edge of the frame through the middle of their head, then rotate the camera on it's tripod 1/3 of the frame and 2/3 of the frame and see what number of degrees the the tripod indicator moves..

This is MUCH EASIER if the tripod has a 360degree circle and a nice amount of marked in between degrees..

Remember you want no less than 20% overlap, 33% better. the more places you give your pano software to find common control points the easier it will have lining the pics up..

You can do the above for a series of different lenses or mm on a zoom. then simply write down on a 3x5 card the number of degrees for each mm. you only have to do his once if you keep the card. be sure to thank your helper. instead of a helper you can also use a telphone pole or similar...

Comment #14

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

Leon Wittwer wrote:.

I do a lot of panoramas (see site below). I tend to shoot around 35mm on a 1.3 crop camera or about 45 mm equivalent. I print the panoswith a print surface of 10 inches vertically and as long asnecessary. I find that if I hold the pano about 12-15 inches from myeyes wrapped around my head, I reasonable reproduce the perspective Ihad when I shot the pano. As far as peripheral vision is concerned,180 degrees (about 42 inches wide) seems to work very well to providethe correct impression. If I get into it, I can turn my head todifferent parts of the pano and it still works.

Hope this helps.PS. I stitch manually so I use an overlap of about 50% when I shoot.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm.

Are you using any specific Pano gear to help you get the exactmeasurements right? How many shots do you usually take then? I'm notexactly sure if I'll go ahead and print out all the panoramas. I wasthinking of just putting it up on the web for my own pleasure..

No. I shoot off hand because many of my shooting locations are not practical for tripods. This takes considerable practice in shooting and stitching. My panos take from two to thirty or so pictures taken in portrait mode. The scene that I am shooting determines the number of shots.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #15

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