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neutral density filter options
Hi, I'm planning to get a neutral density filter but not sure what rating to get..

My main use of it is to increase shutter speeds to blur motion. e.g. waterful in daylight conditions. I have a polarizer filter but it does not stop down enough. would a 0.9 version enough for my needs?.

I've also read in a tutorial that suggested to use 2 polarizer filters stacked, and by rotating one you will able to acheive infinitly variable levels of darkening. has anyone tried this and how well does in work in practice?.

Thank you.John..

Comments (7)

Xjzha1 wrote:.

Hi, I'm planning to get a neutral density filter but not sure whatrating to get..

My main use of it is to increase shutter speeds to blur motion. e.g.waterful in daylight conditions. I have a polarizer filter but itdoes not stop down enough. would a 0.9 version enough for my needs?.

A .9 only gives you 3 stops less light. For instance a bright day at the waterfall you might be shooting f16 at 1/100th of a second. Three stops get you to 1/15th of a second. This will slightly blur the water. But if your looking for those silky blurred looking photos you probably need to be down around 1 second in exposure..

I'd suggest a 1.8 or even a 3 for that kind of ND photo. They're not that expensive, I'd pick up all three, .9, 1.8, and 3..

I've also read in a tutorial that suggested to use 2 polarizerfilters stacked, and by rotating one you will able to acheiveinfinitly variable levels of darkening. has anyone tried this and howwell does in work in practice?.

It does work as long as the polarizer next to the lens is a circular and then the one you put on top (farthest from the lens) is a linear polarizer. You need realatively good polarizers or you'll get light variations across the field and sometime color shifts. Hoya, B+W or Heliopan are good choices. If you already have a polarizer you can just add the linear polarizer to your kit. One downside is that you have 2 stacked filters and on a lot of lenses this will result in vignetting where the corners of the picture are slightly dark due to the filters stack obstructing some of the light at the edges..

Thank you.John.

A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #1

ND 3 or higher, never tried the CP trick. I have an ND 4 I think and it works well in daylight to get motion blurs on water.Benhttp://www.b3nbrooks.com/blog/ - for my pics...

Comment #2

Ben Brooks wrote:.

ND 3 or higher, never tried the CP trick. I have an ND 4 I think andit works well in daylight to get motion blurs on water.Benhttp://www.b3nbrooks.com/blog/ - for my pics..

I guess there are many ways to label the "power" of the ND's..

I have one called ND8, where the 8 means it gives 8 times longer shuttertime, that is 3 stops. That for sure ain't enough to blur water a sunny day, far from so..

And the topic starter talks about .9 and similar, I dont have a clue what that might mean?.

I guess there are lots of different ways to label these ND-filters....too many for it to be good for us customers...http://sebastianfoto.se/..

Comment #3

Sebastian_R wrote:.

I guess there are lots of different ways to label theseND-filters....too many for it to be good for us customers....

Agreed.

Benhttp://www.b3nbrooks.com/blog/ - for my pics...

Comment #4

From what I understood the 0.9 is of 8x which is 8 stops?.

Http://www.bhphotovideo.com/..._.9+%288X%29&fakeSubmitButton=Submit+Query.

LM2 wrote:.

Xjzha1 wrote:.

Hi, I'm planning to get a neutral density filter but not sure whatrating to get..

My main use of it is to increase shutter speeds to blur motion. e.g.waterful in daylight conditions. I have a polarizer filter but itdoes not stop down enough. would a 0.9 version enough for my needs?.

A .9 only gives you 3 stops less light. For instance a bright day atthe waterfall you might be shooting f16 at 1/100th of a second.Three stops get you to 1/15th of a second. This will slightly blurthe water. But if your looking for those silky blurred lookingphotos you probably need to be down around 1 second in exposure.I'd suggest a 1.8 or even a 3 for that kind of ND photo. They're notthat expensive, I'd pick up all three, .9, 1.8, and 3..

I've also read in a tutorial that suggested to use 2 polarizerfilters stacked, and by rotating one you will able to acheiveinfinitly variable levels of darkening. has anyone tried this and howwell does in work in practice?.

It does work as long as the polarizer next to the lens is a circularand then the one you put on top (farthest from the lens) is a linearpolarizer. You need realatively good polarizers or you'll get lightvariations across the field and sometime color shifts. Hoya, B+W orHeliopan are good choices. If you already have a polarizer you canjust add the linear polarizer to your kit. One downside is that youhave 2 stacked filters and on a lot of lenses this will result invignetting where the corners of the picture are slightly dark due tothe filters stack obstructing some of the light at the edges..

Thank you.John.

A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #5

Here is a helpful chart from Cokin relating the several different types of notation for the strength of th neutral density: http://www.cokin.com/cokin-data/Brochure/COKIN%20ND%20Chart.pdf.

Another brochure from Cokin give more information on using ND filters: http://www.cokin.com/.../cokin-data/Brochure/Neutral%20Density%20Filters.pdf.

Cokin uses an integer designation that shows the amount of light reduction as a factor. Thus their ND8 passes 1/8 of the light. Since 1/2 of the light is equal to one stop, 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/8, this filter reduces the light by 3 stops. (Another way to think of it is 2^3 = 8.).

The other notation system uses the decimal logarithm of the factor. Thus log10(8) = 0.9; ND4 = 2 stops = 0.6; ND2 = 1 stop = 0.3, etc..

Davehttp://www.pbase.com/dsjtecserv..

Comment #6

Xjzha1 wrote:.

From what I understood the 0.9 is of 8x which is 8 stops?.

Http://www.bhphotovideo.com/..._.9+%288X%29&fakeSubmitButton=Submit+Query.

Better look again, 3 stops.A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #7

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