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Need help: Green becomes Yellowish Green when printed
Yesterday I had several of my image files sent to a photo printing shop for printing. When I got the printed photos I noticed that some of the objects (plants), when looked green on my monitor, become yellowish green on photo paper..

I believe this is caused by the difference in color ranges on different devices (monitor vs phto printer in my case). I just want to know if there is a way to get around this (for example, adjusting the color properly before sending an image file for printing)..

All advises appreciated...

Comments (8)

Tmyuen wrote:.

I believe this is caused by the difference in color ranges ondifferent devices (monitor vs phto printer in my case)..

The differences, if there are any, can be compensated for in editing. However, to edit accurately it is important to make the image on screen as true to the file in computer memory as possible..

To do this you should profile the monitor with a hardware puck device like the Spyder-3 or Eye-one..

I just wantto know if there is a way to get around this (for example, adjustingthe color properly before sending an image file for printing)..

Only when your monitor is accurate can you be sure of what you are sending for printing. Profiling the monitor isn't ALL you have to do to put in place a proper ""colour managed workflow"", but it is that important first step.Regards,Baz..

Comment #1

My monitor is not calibrated. I use Lightroom for post processing and Costco to print. I found that I usually have to increase the exposure on my pictures by about a 1/2 to 3/4 of a stop to get pictures that are closer to what I see on my monitor. (The brightness on my monitor is set high so that I can read financial spreadsheets.) My color prints are slightly off but still very acceptable to me. I also check an option not to allow auto color adjustments by Costco. The issue you are having concerns a very broad and complicated (to me) topic of "color management." Search on this topic for further info...

Comment #2

I agree with MaryGierth about "color management" being broad and complicated. I'm an amateur, so I haven't found it necessary to calibrate my monitor with anything more than the cheap, built-in software. It works for me so far and Costco's printing is very close to what I see on screen. (I know they do have 'color profiles' that you can download for Photoshop so that what you see on screen is even closer to what their printers print, but even that looked too technical/time consuming for me.).

My advice (the easy way) is to try a number of local print places and see which one is closer to what you're seeing on screen. I know that "real" photographers think that monitor calibration with expensive hardware/software is the only way to go, but then I'm not a "real" photographer. Yet.Hope this helps,JonGive me something to shoot..

Comment #3

Tmyuen wrote:.

I just wantto know if there is a way to get around this.

At this point it is impossible to tell if the color shift was caused by color differences in the devices or by a real problem that needs to be fixed. We need more info...What kind of camera?Did you shoot RAW, TIFF, or JPEG?SRGB or AdobeRGB?Did you try adjusting the colors before sending to the printer?Did you try changing the color profile?What kind of file did you send the printer?.

If theres one thing you dont see much talk about is the need to profile cameras. Thats because cameras tend to be pretty darn accurate in their capture of color. If an image is properly exposed, and has the correct white balance applied, then it should print properly. Your monitor has nothing to do with it..

Here are some possible causes..

You sent a 16-bit AdobeRGB image to the printer. Ive seen that cause a shift from green to yellow when printed. Either the file was untagged or the printer ignored the tag because they do everything in sRGB..

Bad white balance. If you photograph green under tungsten lights while the camera is set to daylight then you will get a yellow green. Automatic white balance tends not to do a good job under tungsten lighting, so that could be a cause as well. However, you should see the yellow shift on your monitor..

Bad printing. Printing isnt always perfect. Sometimes colors go bad for technical reasons..

Here's my thought...if your green plants were green on your monitor, then your monitor is just fine...proper color conversion between devices is not the problem. That leaves the file format, which is my number one suspect, and the printer. if you post one of the files we can look at it and let you know if it looks suspect. Also, it can't hurt to contact Costco and ask if there was a rash of bad prints...

Comment #4

Graystar wrote:.

At this point it is impossible to tell if the color shift was causedby color differences in the devices or by a real problem that needsto be fixed. We need more info....

The original file is posted at my picasa web album:.

Http://picasaweb.google.com.tw/tmyuen.tw/Canon450D/.

Last pic, captioned "Plant 1".

What kind of camera?.

- Canon XSI/450D.

Did you shoot RAW, TIFF, or JPEG?.

- JPEG.

SRGB or AdobeRGB?.

- sRBG.

Did you try adjusting the colors before sending to the printer?.

- Did ajust brightness/contrast, but no colors..

Did you try changing the color profile?.

- No.

What kind of file did you send the printer?.

- JPEG.

Appreciate the help, really.....

Comment #5

Tmyuen wrote:.

Graystar wrote:.

At this point it is impossible to tell if the color shift was causedby color differences in the devices or by a real problem that needsto be fixed. We need more info....

The original file is posted at my picasa web album:.

Http://picasaweb.google.com.tw/tmyuen.tw/Canon450D/.

Thank you for posting pictures. As always, it is very helpful in coming to conclusions......

Of all the thumbnails that display when the above link opens, the last one at bottom right (Plant 1) is more noticeably yellow-biased than any of the others. This extra yellowness is quite obvious despite the lack of any neutrals (greys) in the shot..

The yellow colour appears to be caused by the back-lighting.....

..... possibly because it is evening sun (shot within two hours of sunset) ... and with Auto WB having insufficient data to run with in a shot having essentially only one colour in it.....[??].

... or possibly because that's the colour most leaves become when back-lit.... [??].

.... or possibly a bit of both, of course!.

Conclusion 1: If your print is rather yellow-green instead of green, that is entirely to be expected, because that is how the file actually IS, and that in turn reflects the scene as it was in reality. This shows up very clearly on my monitor which is a calibrated one..

Conclusion 2: If the print is MUCH MORE yellow-green than the same image appears on your screen, then we are talking about a colour distortion that moves the image away from reality. If so, then it is has to be a split between the print being somewhat too yellow, and the monitor being somewhat too blue. Naturally, ONLY independent calibration of the monitor can give any indication where that split in responsibility for the inaccuracy actually is between the two..

Moral of this story: Ascertaining where any fault lies in digital colour reproduction is very hard indeed, unless at least ONE part of the system is accurate and reliable. The device to standardise (as far as is possible) is the computer monitor, because it is the ONE window into the digital system that we have..

Final point: If anyone wants to see just how much images on-screen can differ from each other, then just breeze into a store selling TV sets and look at a wall of them all showing the same input signal. The massive variations in displayed colours and tones should be enough to convince anybody that monitor calibration is a vital part of critical colour editing in digital photography.Regards,Baz..

Comment #6

When you view your image on the Internet with a browser...do the greens appear correct?.

I ask because I have no way of knowing your interpretation of the green that I see. I dont know if you think the green is accurate to the live plant, or if you think it has a yellow cast..

The name of the software you use is stored in the EXIF data. I have read that Fuji Frontier printers will always perform auto color correction if the software used was not Photoshop. Your EXIF says Digital Photo Profession, so this may be a factor. To test this all you need to do is open the image in Photoshop and save. No adjustments should be necessary. Now, the Fuji Frontier should abide by the instruction to not correct the color.



When I view the image in any of the software I use (Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro, Raw Therapee) the image always looks the same, and it looks like the greens do have a yellowish cast..

I notice the image has some blown out areas where the sun got through. In the printed image, is there any color cast in those areas or is it white?..

Comment #7

Barrie Davis wrote:.

Conclusion 2: If the print is MUCH MORE yellow-green than the sameimage appears on your screen, then we are talking about a colourdistortion that moves the image away from reality. If so, then it ishas to be a split between the print being somewhat too yellow, andthe monitor being somewhat too blue..

My situation is just as you described in Conclusion 2, and I believe it's a color distortion that the print shop machine developed..

Guess what? I sent the same image file to another shop, and this time the printed photo is much close to what I see on the monitor!!! The first one is just giving such a yellow appearance - very much like the green color is all washed away..

Maybe the combination of photo paper and chemicals at the first shop doesn't go well... I don't know. Anyway, I now know which shop to go next time I want my pics printed..

I thank you all for your time and patience...

Comment #8

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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