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my first dSLR requirements
HiI've been using prosumer non-slr for ages, but now want to upgrade to pro SLR.But I have a list of requirements, can anyone advise accordingly, please?In my dSLR, I would like:1.use the lcd screen to compose and shoot ('live view' I think it's called?)2. professional image quality3. ightweight4. anti-dust technology5. idiot-proof buttons (will mostly use auto settings)I also have a lens question:1. best quality semi-macro/close up to landscape in one lens ...in case this alters/enhances the answer to the body question.Price is not a major concern, but don't want to go sillyMany thanks in advancecheersPet..

Comments (8)

Nikon D300 or Canon 40D, I would favour the former..

Lens is tricky as macro/wideangle is an oxymoron, but maybe Nikon AF 60mm f/2.8 or Canon EF 50mm f2.5..

Or a Nikon 28-105 mm which is wider and goes to 1:2 close up, not genuine macro though. A good lens though not top quality..

Alex..

Comment #1

Exactly the two cameras I'd whittled down to!thanksI maybe wasn't too helpfull with my lens:1. Quality more important than price2. small/lightweight3. range from dinner plate to scenic... if that helps?Pet..

Comment #2

I'd suggest the Olympus E-410 or NIkon D40. I'd suggest the Pentax K100D, although I own one and perhaps that personal bias. The weight difference is not so great as you'd think, especially when you factor in the lens weights..

The Nikon would give you a larger range of lenses to choose from. The Olympus would give you the only effective anti-dust system. I'd say that, in practice, reasonable care when changing lenses will give you little or no dust on most DSLRs. If you are not planning on changing lenses much then it's a minor concern..

The D300 and 40D are very expensive beasts - lord knows why you'd start on one of those. Start with the 400D or D40 if you choose Canon or Nikon..

The Pentax is very cost-effective and there are plenty of excellent lenses. Pentax does a very good prime lens set. In relation to your specific needs I am not sure, but the Pentax 16-45 might be good - it's certainly popular ! The Pentax limited edition primes are quite compact and might be good - the 43mm is a beaut..

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #3

If you are going to use the automatic modes, I think you should stay with a point and shoot..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #4

Petronia wrote:.

HiI've been using prosumer non-slr for ages, but now want to upgrade topro SLR.But I have a list of requirements, can anyone advise accordingly,please?In my dSLR, I would like:1.use the lcd screen to compose and shoot ('live view' I think itscalled?).

With any camera, I would recommend using the viewfinder, not the LCD. The LCD should be used only if it is a situation where the Viewfinder cannot be used..

One of the first things a photographer will learn is how to hold a camera steady. Most photographers, if not all, find they can steady the camera better using the viewfinder..

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #5

Petronia wrote:.

Exactly the two cameras I'd whittled down to!thanksI maybe wasn't too helpfull with my lens:1. Quality more important than price2. small/lightweight3. range from dinner plate to scenic... if that helps?.

Nothing wrong with the Nikon D40, though it doesn't have live view. I wouldn't use that even if I had it, viewfinders are much better..

Nothing wrong either with starting with a D300, I did with a D200 - though neither has a full auto mode, I use mine usually in aperture priority. If you're not happy yet venturing out of auto mode, then a D40 may be a better option. But make sure you handle the D40 and D300 (when it comes out) if considering both as the latter is *much* larger and heavier..

One Nikon lens often quoted as a 'catch all' is the 18-200VR, quite nice though a lens of that range has to suffer a bit on image quality. If you got the D40 I might recommend a quality lens: the Nikon 17-55 f/2.8. Not cheap or small but top notch, fast (i.e. a constant wide maximum aperture) and a good range..

Later you could add a 55-200VR (good and cheap) if you wanted more reach. Or the 70-200 VR is money is no object - though that is a biggish and heavy lens..

Alex..

Comment #6

Petronia wrote:.

HiI've been using prosumer non-slr for ages, but now want to upgrade topro SLR.But I have a list of requirements, can anyone advise accordingly,please?In my dSLR, I would like:1.use the lcd screen to compose and shoot ('live view' I think itscalled?).

Olympuses, Panasonic, Nikon D300, Canon 40D..

2. professional image quality.

That depends on photographer..

3. ightweight.

That means just Olympus stay in the list (Nikon D300 and Canon 40D are bulky and heavy)..

4. anti-dust technology.

Olympus has it. Canon's anti-dust system is rather marketing gimmick than effective system..

5. idiot-proof buttons (will mostly use auto settings)I also have a lens question:1. best quality semi-macro/close up to landscape in one lens ...in case this alters/enhances the answer to the body question..

Reading this (and requirement of LiveView feature) made me think that you really doesn't want DSLR, you want good DSLR-like .

DSLR main advantages over digicams are 1) large sensor; 2) interchangeable lenses (you don't want that), 3) optical viewfinder (you don't want that either); 4) operating speed..

Anyway, it seems that Olympus E-510 is the camera for you....

Edvinas..

Comment #7

In regard to liveview, something to bare in mind that there are limitations*... with existing cameras anyways... you must deal with while using such systems in place of the Viewfinder. The primary limitation is with autofocus. Most Live view capable DSLRs must still use their phase detection system, which requires the mirror to be flipped down first, temporarily blinding the sensor**. Now the newest Panasonic (~with specific lenses~) and Nikons can get around this by giving you the option of using [thru-the-sensor] contrast detection Autofocus, however CD is much slower than PD..

Another thing is that, even if you set the camera to manual focus, certain liveview capable DSLRs will still flip their mirrors down and then up again to get a meter reading. This results is a slightly longer delay between pressing the shutter release and a picture actually being taken..

*Even when compared to the liveview on fixed-lens digitals..

**An exception exists with the older Olympus E330. This camera had a second low-res sensor (specifically for liveview) that could operate with the mirror down, so the Autofocus isn't bypassed...

Comment #8

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