snubbr.com

Musings about Filters for dSLR
Hello all,.

I was thinking about picking up a Circular Polarizer Filter for my Oly dSLR camera.Still, some things I am curious to know..

Do you use the filter often (like leave it on the lens most of the time) or is it only useful in specific occasions like sky or water photography?.

I understood B&W is considered the A brand, but does it's quality (and higher price) justify the difference with filters of brands like Hoya or Sigma for example?.

Cheers,..

Comments (19)

I don't leave mine on because it impacts the brightness of the lens. Also since I only use it for landscape shots etc and I don't do those other then on good light..

As for the cost I have a Hoya and don't have any problems. However I would steer way clear of the cheap filters on Ebay. I bought a UV filter that way and had really soft images. Took the filter off and had really sharp images. The filter now rests in peace at the bottom of the lake where I figured out the problem. It was the best use I got from the filter.



JimOlympus E-510 and a bunch of stuff to hang on it...

Comment #1

Here's some info from George Lepp:.

Http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/...ech-tips/best-polarizer-techniques.html.

I've used both B+W and Hoya and don't notice any difference. Maybe there is a subtle one if you're using high-end equipment, but I don't. As the previous poster stated, avoid cheap no-name filters..

Regards,Jeffhttp://www.jhudson.zenfolio.com..

Comment #2

I think a Hoya S-HMC and a B+W MRC or Heliopan are going to give similar optical performance..

IMO the B+W and Heliopan's have better build quality and the potential to last longer. If I'm going to use something frequently I expect it to last. I'd rather pay say $120 one time than say $80 twice. YMMV...

Comment #3

Any filter youmnput on a photo lens has to be as good quality as the lens you use it on, ot the IQ will suffer. it makes no sense for example to buy a $10 filter and put it on a $1500 lens; you are just asking for trouble..

I started slr/dslr in 1970 and had filters on all my lenses, over time they all came off. I have never put them back on since. I am tallking protective filters. as for the others I rarely use them...

Comment #4

Ericinho wrote: >.

Do you use the filter often (like leave it on the lens most of thetime) or is it only useful in specific occasions like sky or waterphotography?.

You don't want to leave this on your lens all the time.1) It cuts the light by one to two stops, not desirable in lower light levels..

2) It works well only in specific lighting situations, and must be oriented to the direction of the light.3) It will increase the probability of lens flare when shooting into the light.Regards, John...

Comment #5

Ericinho wrote:.

Do you use the filter often (like leave it on the lens most of thetime) or is it only useful in specific occasions like sky or waterphotography?.

I don't use it often - it is useful for landscapes. You can't leave it on the lens all the time because it darkens the shot and your viewfinder.

I understood B&W is considered the A brand, but does it's quality (andhigher price) justify the difference with filters of brands like Hoyaor Sigma for example?.

You can pay more and more for filters. My attitude is that Hoya base is ok for price and performance. I'll shoot with that and if I doubt then I will consider paying more..

The Olympus lit lens are 58mm filter diameter, not an expensive size. If you had 77mm filter size then sure, you don't want to spend money twice..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/http://olympuse510.wikispaces.com/http://picasaweb.google.com/AnandaSim/http://www.flickr.com/photos/32554587@N00/..

Comment #6

Ericinho wrote:.

Do you use the filter often (like leave it on the lens most of thetime) or is it only useful in specific occasions like sky or waterphotography?.

It is unwise to put any filter over the lens unless you have a shot-specific reason to do so. This is doubly true of the polariser, because it consumes so much light quite separately from it's functions in removing reflected glare or enriching blue skies..

Q: How much light is wasted/absorbed?A: Nearly 3/4 of the light from the subject is absorbed by a typical pola..(1+2/3 stops, or the equivelant of reducing 100 ISO to 32 ISO)Regards,Baz..

Comment #7

This covers the basics, also google 'using polarising filters' and theres plenty of advice out there..

Http://www.experience-seminars.co.uk/yorkfolder/polarising.htm - 18k.

Some of the stuff they are good for:.

Cutting haze (often significantly)Darkening skyIncreasing contrastPunching up colour saturationControlling reflectionsBeing an emergency neutral density filter..

FWIW my experience is to try varying the strength, full on polarisation works in some situations but in others you may want a more subtle effect..

Negatives - mostly been stated by others but they can look strange on skies with a lens wider than 28mm (fullframe)/21mm(most dslrs)/14mm(Oly) as the effect is uneven. Also they dont work through airplane windows and the like. There are also times when polarisers are just plain wrong for a shot..

As for colour rendition, Hoya colour rendition tends to be slighly cooler than the European filters like B&W. Not much in it though..

Shay son of CheRepresenting the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation..

Comment #8

Thanks guys..

So from this shortlist, does anyone of them has the preference?.

Sigma Wide Multi-Coated Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya SHMC Super Multi-Coated Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya Digital Pro1 Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya Circular Polarizer (Variable Contrast Control/Glare Reduction) Filter 58mmB+W 58ES Circular Polarizer Filter 58mm..

Comment #9

Ericinho wrote:.

Thanks guys..

So from this shortlist, does anyone of them has the preference?.

Sigma Wide Multi-Coated Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya SHMC Super Multi-Coated Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya Digital Pro1 Circular Polarizer Filter 58mmHoya Circular Polarizer (Variable Contrast Control/Glare Reduction)Filter 58mmB+W 58ES Circular Polarizer Filter 58mm.

I've owned/borrowed the Sigma, Hoya SHMC & B+W and they were all pretty good.Shay son of CheRepresenting the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation..

Comment #10



Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/http://olympuse510.wikispaces.com/http://picasaweb.google.com/AnandaSim/http://www.flickr.com/photos/32554587@N00/..

Comment #11

The simple Hoya is the cheapest, the B&M the most expensive. That differs about 30 euro. But honestly, I choose quality over price in this case...

Comment #12

So I am more interested to know for example if a Multi-Coated is better than one of the simple ones. If being able to adjust contrast (as indicated in a name) is convenient or not.....

Comment #13

Ericinho wrote:.

So I am more interested to know for example if a Multi-Coated isbetter than one of the simple ones. If being able to adjust contrast(as indicated in a name) is convenient or not....

Hint: Don't get too excited about any "contrast adjustment" referred to. I'm afraid that's marketing blurb, and there's no "additional" ability in the filter..

Explanation: Modest contrast changes are a natural consequence of the reflected flare reducing properties of pola filters, and this is true of ALL polarisers.... in the same way as apparent colour saturation is "adjusted"..

Multi coating is worth paying for, and is almost essential when filtering wide angle lenses outdoors. Nevertheless, it is still important to keep direct sunlight off the filter face, and to use a hood, of course.Regards,Baz..

Comment #14

So in short, only go for the polariser which has the term Multi-Coated in the name?.

Barrie Davis wrote:.

Ericinho wrote:.

So I am more interested to know for example if a Multi-Coated isbetter than one of the simple ones. If being able to adjust contrast(as indicated in a name) is convenient or not....

Hint: Don't get too excited about any "contrast adjustment" referredto. I'm afraid that's marketing blurb, and there's no "additional"ability in the filter..

Explanation: Modest contrast changes are a natural consequence of thereflected flare reducing properties of pola filters, and this is trueof ALL polarisers.... in the same way as apparent colour saturationis "adjusted".Multi coating is worth paying for, and is almost essential whenfiltering wide angle lenses outdoors. Nevertheless, it is stillimportant to keep direct sunlight off the filter face, and to use ahood, of course.Regards,Baz..

Comment #15

FYI.

Found this interesting reading about Hoya filters from Mr. Rockwell:.

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/hoya/filters.htm..

Comment #16

Beware Ken Rockwell's advice. He writes prolifically. His logic is not always self consistent..

In other words, sometimes he's correct by accident. A stopped analog clock is correct twice a day..

IMHO Hoya S-HMC's are good filters optically. Multicoated B+W's or Heliopan's are at least as good optically and have better build quality. The decision is up to you but please make your own decision, not one based on KR's advice...

Comment #17

Ericinho wrote:.

Hello all,.

I was thinking about picking up a Circular Polarizer Filter for myOly dSLR camera.Still, some things I am curious to know..

I understood B&W is considered the A brand, but does it's quality (and.

Higher price) justify the difference with filters of brands like Hoyaor Sigma for example?.

Before you part with your money, no matter what type of fiter, do this:.

Hold the filter in such a way that you can see the reflection of one of the lamps (fluoro or tungsten) in the store's ceiling. (You will need to remove the item from it's packaging first.).

The better the non-reflective coating, the dimmer will be the reflection..

If the reflection in the item is almost as bright as the actual lamp (or the reflection off the packaging), don't buy the item (no matter what it costs or who made it). Remember: even "expensive" brands have "entry level" (code for "cr-p") products..

(This test can also be applied to the front elements of lenses)..

Comment #18

Thanks. No, I would never do that..

Anyway, I found the B&W circulair Pol MRC 58 ES for 60 euro, so I will go for that one..

Mrxdimension wrote:.

Beware Ken Rockwell's advice. He writes prolifically. His logic isnot always self consistent..

In other words, sometimes he's correct by accident. A stoppedanalog clock is correct twice a day..

IMHO Hoya S-HMC's are good filters optically. Multicoated B+W's orHeliopan's are at least as good optically and have better buildquality. The decision is up to you but please make your owndecision, not one based on KR's advice...

Comment #19

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.