snubbr.com

Mother/photo enthusiast making jump to DSLR requesting help!! (450D, D40, or 40D?)
Everytime I think I've made a decision, I keep reading to learn more about using a DSLR and I'm back at square one! I've decided to ask for specific help/suggestions because my husband's losing patience with how much time I'm spending with the computer! : ).

Background:Full-time homemaker/mother breaking into DSLR area as a hobby.

Own: HP850 (bought for zoom and megapixels, but has very slow shutter response) and PowerShot SD700IS (wanted pocket size that I'd actually use on day trips; love continuous shot mode and playing with color swap and other features).

I have a LOT to learn, and the more I read, the more I realize I don't understand. I'm asking for help because funds are very (VERY) limited, this as a huge investment for us, and I don't want to under- or over-buy due to lack of knowledge. I know that megapixels aren't the thing to get stuck on, but I want to be sure to cover my bases when it comes to proper mm and f ratings I'll need..

What I'll be taking photos of: young children (portrait and playing) sports (indoor basketball and outdoor soccer) landscape (especially macro shots of flowers) want to get better indoor photos without glaring flash night time shots (think city skylines) currently do a lot of cropping, and want to keep good quality image.

(Okay, so I want to shoot everything!) I've waited a loooong time to jump into this arena, and want to avoid regrets over money unnecessarily spent..

Features important to me: continous mode great clear, crisp quality photos RAW image good pics in low light with low noise.

Capturing sports photos that aren't blurred and with proper lighting (indoors).

Cameras I'm considering:.

1. Canon 450D (XSi) with EF-S 18-55mm IS and adding on whatever zoom lens is necessary for sport events; considering 50 mm/f 1.8 for indoor/low light..

2. Canon 40D with 28-135 mm; add on whatever zoom len may be necessary for sport events..

3. Nikon D40 kit with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX and 55-200mm f/4.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor Lens ($636 at Amazon). The price looks great on this, but I'm hesitant to buy a camera that is limited to AF-S lenses. Is this a valid concern? Also, is this price so good because these aren't VR lenses? Is there a 50mm lens that will work with it? (I had considered keeping things simple by getting the D40 body, 18-200 mm lens, and external flash, but have read mixed reviews about the lens.).

4. I had originally considered the Powershot G9, but I feel like that would be the next step up from P&S and the camera maybe couldn't handle the sports shots I'd like to get. Any thoughts? When I added up the cost of additional lenses and external flash, I was heading in the price range of the 450D. Also, I was concerned with the number of people posting about stuck pixels and dust problems..

5. I'd consider adding an external flash with any of these cameras. Based on what I want to shoot, which ones would you recommend?.

6. Any clue if Canon or Nikon offer international warranties? We live in the US part time and Singapore part time..

I'm sure all of this has been answered 100 times before, but at this point, I've spent WAY too much time reading others' comments and need some specific answers..

Thanks,Donna..

Comments (10)

Donnar100 wrote:.

What I'll be taking photos of: young children (portrait and playing) sports (indoor basketball and outdoor soccer) landscape (especially macro shots of flowers) want to get better indoor photos without glaring flash night time shots (think city skylines) currently do a lot of cropping, and want to keep good quality image.

(Okay, so I want to shoot everything!) I've waited a loooong time tojump into this arena, and want to avoid regrets over moneyunnecessarily spent..

Features important to me: continous mode great clear, crisp quality photos RAW image good pics in low light with low noise capturing sports photos that aren't blurred and with properlighting (indoors).

Cameras I'm considering:.

1. Canon 450D (XSi) with EF-S 18-55mm IS and adding on whatever zoomlens is necessary for sport events; considering 50 mm/f 1.8 forindoor/low light..

Good choice.

2. Canon 40D with 28-135 mm; add on whatever zoom len may benecessary for sport events..

Too expensive body for a tight budget..

3. Nikon D40 kit with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX and 55-200mmf/4.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor Lens ($636 at Amazon). The pricelooks great on this, but I'm hesitant to buy a camera that is limitedto AF-S lenses. Is this a valid concern? Also, is this price so goodbecause these aren't VR lenses? Is there a 50mm lens that will workwith it? (I had considered keeping things simple by getting the D40body, 18-200 mm lens, and external flash, but have read mixed reviewsabout the lens.).

I would not take the kit. Maybe 18-55 without VR and 55-200 with VR. The problem will be low light because 50 f/1.8 will not AF. But MF is quite easy and you have in viewfinder a focus indicator when the camera thinks you have the subject in focus. I think Sigma has HSM primes that work with Nikon D40..

The flash will help you much more than a very fast lens for indoor shots (bounce on the ceiling)..

VictorBucuresti, Romaniahttp://s106.photobucket.com/albums/m268/victor_petcu/http://picasaweb.google.com/teodor.nitica/..

Comment #1

Donnar100 wrote:.

Everytime I think I've made a decision, I keep reading to learn moreabout using a DSLR and I'm back at square one! I've decided to askfor specific help/suggestions because my husband's losing patiencewith how much time I'm spending with the computer! : ).

Background:Full-time homemaker/mother breaking into DSLR area as a hobbyOwn: HP850 (bought for zoom and megapixels, but has very slow shutterresponse) and PowerShot SD700IS (wanted pocket size that I'd actuallyuse on day trips; love continuous shot mode and playing with colorswap and other features).

I have a LOT to learn, and the more I read, the more I realize Idon't understand. I'm asking for help because funds are very (VERY)limited, this as a huge investment for us, and I don't want to under-or over-buy due to lack of knowledge. I know that megapixels aren'tthe thing to get stuck on, but I want to be sure to cover my baseswhen it comes to proper mm and f ratings I'll need..

It's impossible to get everything you want in one cheap, entry-level camera system!.

What I'll be taking photos of: young children (portrait and playing).

Any of your choices will work well..

Sports (indoor basketball and outdoor soccer).

Indoor sports is undoubtedly one of the most difficult environments...you need great high sensitivity (ISO) and a very fast lens. Outdoor soccer is also a tough one, because you need a fast long FL lens and short exposure time. Solving these issues is expensive!.

Landscape (especially macro shots of flowers).

Easy...get a macro lens and a tripod..

Want to get better indoor photos without glaring flash.

Easy, learn how to use flash (bounce & off-camera)..

Night time shots (think city skylines).

Any of your choices will work with that tripod you got for the flower macros. .

Currently do a lot of cropping, and want to keep good quality image.

As you learn more, you will get better at framing the original shot, so again, any of the cameras on your short-list will be OK..

(Okay, so I want to shoot everything!) I've waited a loooong time tojump into this arena, and want to avoid regrets over moneyunnecessarily spent..

You can't. If you drop the indoor basketball and outdoor soccer requirement, you will have no trouble selecting a camera..

Features important to me: continous mode great clear, crisp quality photos RAW image good pics in low light with low noise capturing sports photos that aren't blurred and with properlighting (indoors).

The first 4 are easy. Heck, 4 outa 5 isn't bad! .

Cameras I'm considering:.

1. Canon 450D (XSi) with EF-S 18-55mm IS and adding on whatever zoomlens is necessary for sport events; considering 50 mm/f 1.8 forindoor/low light..

2. Canon 40D with 28-135 mm; add on whatever zoom len may benecessary for sport events..

I'd suggest a 70-200 f2.8 and 1.4TC for the soccer..

3. Nikon D40 kit with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX and 55-200mmf/4.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor Lens ($636 at Amazon). The pricelooks great on this, but I'm hesitant to buy a camera that is limitedto AF-S lenses. Is this a valid concern? Also, is this price so goodbecause these aren't VR lenses? Is there a 50mm lens that will workwith it? (I had considered keeping things simple by getting the D40body, 18-200 mm lens, and external flash, but have read mixed reviewsabout the lens.).

Yes, that 18-200 lens is not fast enough. It also has only moderate IQ..

4. I had originally considered the Powershot G9, but I feel like thatwould be the next step up from P&S and the camera maybe couldn'thandle the sports shots I'd like to get. Any thoughts? When I addedup the cost of additional lenses and external flash, I was heading inthe price range of the 450D. Also, I was concerned with the number ofpeople posting about stuck pixels and dust problems..

Pass on this one!.

5. I'd consider adding an external flash with any of these cameras.Based on what I want to shoot, which ones would you recommend?.

Nikon has the best flash system. Suggest a SB-600/800..

6. Any clue if Canon or Nikon offer international warranties? We livein the US part time and Singapore part time..

Not sure?.

I'm sure all of this has been answered 100 times before, but at thispoint, I've spent WAY too much time reading others' comments and needsome specific answers..

If you are considering the 40D, then also look at the D200?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #2

I don't have a lot to add to what the other posters have said except to say you have selected three cameras at very different price points which makes it difficult to advise you..

Clearly, if you can afford it, you should go for the Canon 40D (or Nikon D200) which is much the best body. However, you could go for a cheaper body and spend more on lenses and a flash. It depends on your budget..

Some other points:.

I wouldn't recommend the 28-135mm IS with the 40D. It is an excellent lens on a film camera or full frame digital, but the zoom range isn't ideal on the 1.6x crop of the 40D, especially if you want to shoot landscapes. The 17-55 IS as on the 450D would be a more flexible choice, or the 17-85 IS which is the 1.6x crop factor equivalent of the 28-135 on a full frame camera..

If you go Canon, the 430EX flash would be a suitable choice.Chris R..

Comment #3

Since you say you are on a VERY limited budget, then you should select an entry level DSLR (ie: low priced). Pretty much all DSLR's today offer excellent image quality..

One thing about the Nikon D40 is that not all of Nikon's lenses will work with that body..

Otherwise, the information/suggestions offered bythe other posters is very good..

The greatest of mankind's criminals are those who delude themselves into thinking they have done 'the right thing.'- Rayna Butler..

Comment #4

There's olympus and pentax out there to consider as well that offer very good alternatives to what you are considering and have some benefits that those listed don't..

Pentax in this price range is weather sealed with a sealed lens attached, shooting kids at the pool no reason to worry..

Olympus has 10mp, an exceptional range of lenses, dust reduction that actually woks as opposed to any of the others and in body image stabilization which will also benefit a new user..

Just throwing those out there with a few of their features that might interest someone in your shoes. do a little more homework and you'll find they have some more benefits over the canon/nikons as well that you may not have seen or considered..

Big thing is to go hold any that you consider as hand feel will be a big part of the decision as there is not a lousy camera in the bunch, the biggest differences lie mostly in feature sets and upgrade lenses..

Bodies become disposable at a point(regardless of price point you come in at), the lens system is the real commitment as good glass will always be good glass..

My $.02 Oly e510 2 lens kit to start, check your local best buy there are people getting them on clearance for less than $500. Please note though this seems to vary from store to store and is not available over the internet..

Over time add the following.

14-54mm f2.8-3.5, 50-200mm f2.8-5.6, sigma 30mm f1.4(for low light indoors) + flash and you are covered for everything you've have mentioned. these lenses will cover an effective focal length from 28mm-400mm in 2 lenses with very good light gathering ability. the 30mm is an option for really low light situations if over time you feel you need it..

Shop used regardless of what you buy(keh.com) to manage if need be the budget and you'll have a great kit that will serve you well for a long time...

Comment #5

Meant to also add as you add the upgrade lenses you could sell the kit lenses to offset their costs. The Oly kit lenses are regarded quite highly as they are small, light, and sharp. some keep both for a light walk around lens.

The kit lenses cover 28mm - 300mm over the 2 lenses so you get a great range to start with....

More food for thought, enjoy whatever you buy.....

Comment #6

Donnar100 wrote:.

Love continuous shot mode.

I suspect that for anything other than sports, continuous shot mode is overrated. I find that my DSLR's fast cycle time for manual shooting is much more useful than the ability to hold down the shutter and "machine gun" shots at 3fps..

I'm asking for help because funds are very (VERY) limited(Okay, so I want to shoot everything!).

It's impossible to find a camera that does everything in the world well, on a limited budget. Low-light indoor sports is one of the more demanding tasks for a camera (and one of the more expensive to prepare well for)..

What I'll be taking photos of: young children (portrait and playing) sports (indoor basketball and outdoor soccer) landscape (especially macro shots of flowers) want to get better indoor photos without glaring flash night time shots (think city skylines).

For young children, any kit lens should give you an adequate focal length range the real question will be, do you want to supplement or replace the kit lens so as to get a lens capable of letting in more light?.

You should get an external tilt/bounce flash that works with the camera maker's TTL metering system. Bouncing the flash off the ceiling (or using a diffuser) will help you to avoid "red eye"..

For outdoors sports in bright light, you could try an inexpensive telephoto say, the Canon 55-250mm VR or the Nikon 55-200mm VR. If all the games will be in near-darkness, well, then you've got the "indoor sports" problem again..

Features important to me:.

Continous mode.

Practically all have this..

Great clear, crisp quality photos.

Practically all can produce such photos provided that they have good lenses, and that the photographer is capable of visualizing/capturing the images..

RAW image good pics in low light with low noise.

Common features (though some DSLRs support higher ISOs or have lower noise than others)..

Capturing sports photos that aren't blurred and with properlighting (indoors).

Lenses vary a lot more in speed than entry-level to mid-level DSLR bodies do. It seems likely that you'll need a fast (expensive) telephoto lens for this application..

Cameras I'm considering:.

1. Canon 450D (XSi) with EF-S 18-55mm IS and adding on whatever zoomlens is necessary for sport events; considering 50 mm/f 1.8 forindoor/low light..

Not bad, but add an external flash (Canon 430 EX ?) for photo-taking at home..

2. Canon 40D with 28-135 mm; add on whatever zoom len may benecessary for sport events..

I agree with the poster who said that this is too expensive a body. If you are trying to do everything on a limited budget, you probably want to skimp on the body (within reason), so that you can spend more on glass..

3. Nikon D40 kit with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX and 55-200mmf/4.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor Lens ($636 at Amazon). The pricelooks great on this, but I'm hesitant to buy a camera that is limitedto AF-S lenses. Is this a valid concern?.

I'd go with a D80 (and did), but that's me..

The situation with AF-S lenses is improving Sigma came out with a motorized version of their 18-50mm constant f/2.8 lens, and Tamron is coming out with a motorized version of their 17-50mm constant f/2.8 lens. Still, I don't think that Nikon has updated it's prime lenses (like the 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/1.8) yet..

Also, is this price so good because these aren't VR lenses?.

Quite possibly. Nikon has VR versions of both of those lenses now..

Is there a 50mm lens that will work with it?.

The Nikon lens will work with it, but you won't get auto-focus. I believe that a D40 will light an indicator in the viewfinder to tell you when it thinks that you've got it right...

Comment #7

Mother to Mother.

I just typed a very detailed response to this thread and somehow it erased I am not happy. So I'll try to rewrite it..

I just went thru the same thing. I decided on the Nikon D40.

D40 is only sold as a kit. I never use the lens it came with but it is nice to have, I guess..

D40 vs. D40x: the extra mega pixels in the D40x can take up a lot of space on your computer and I figure the one time I do want to blow up a pic to an unnecessarily large size I can pay to have it scanned on a high resolution scanner. (never have but heard I could). Also, the buffer on the D40x fills up fast on continuous shooting because of all the info in the mega pixelsI cannot imagine I would have ever noticed, but it's good ammunition to use when pros say the more pixels the better. Also, D40 is cheaper and everyone says I will want to upgrade as technology changes. Use the money for a good lens.



On the D40 and D40x you have to push a button to see info. as you shoot more in manual mode you will want a window on top of the camera. So for the money I push a few extra buttons and enjoy the other benefits of the D40..

I also decided on the 18-200 AF VR.

I love it! So many pros1 I can take a photo across the table or across the street2 I never change lenses (keeps camera clean and I am ready for any shot.3 VR.

Cons.

Its not a fast lens. Like you I want to take photos in low light. You can turn up ISO and have a little grain or use flash. TIP grab a tissue or a slip of paper, and use it as a diffuser in front of the built in flash. It works like a charm. Then wait to get the external flash and use the money toward the lens.

(it does make beautiful lighting).

Most 18-200 lenses get bad reviews but this Nikon has worked well. Two guys in the store were trying to buy it out from under me because it as the last one in stock.Thought it was heavy, now I dont even notice..

As a mom you have tons to do, tons to carry and you will want to have your camera with you all the time and have it be fast and easy to use. You will enjoy all the automatic features even auto and auto no flash, give outstanding results for newbie DSLRersJUST MY OPINION whatever SLR you get youre going to enjoy it..

PS Watch the digitutor on nikons website.Get a UV filter to protect your lens!!!!..

Comment #8

Thanks for all your insightful replies! I was able to go out and handle several of the models last night and am waiting for the 450 to be released before I decide for sure. Thanks again!..

Comment #9

Good flexible lens, flash is small, and non intimidating and able to bounce off ceilings, D40 has larger photo sites than the other entry level DX sensors and has better DR and less noise. Nothing wrong with the 18-200 either but I personally would prefer to get the 18-55 kit lens and the Tamron 28-300 OS which sells for less than the Nikon 18-200. At the end of the day, they both get soft at the long end but neither will ruin an 8x10 print. I shoot the Nikon D300 and D3 but the D40 is my daily/go everywhere/driver...

Comment #10

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.