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most common ISO setting?
Hi,what is the most common/useful ISO settings for vacation, meaning water sports,wild life pictures etc?Just curious, because some cameras have noise starting at some ISO level,and wonder if I should care if camera has noise starting at e.g. 400 ISO?.

Thanks..

Comments (12)

Don't worry about it, especially the noise. Just shoot the lowest you can. Shutter speed and aperture are more important. Cameras have far cleaner images than they did with film in them..

If you shoot Nikon, you have the advantage of auto ISO, among other things of course..

The higher the ISO, the less colourful the image and the less dynamic range it has. For holiday snaps, it's not an issue. When you are out in the sun, you can happily shoot most of your stuff at the lowest setting..

Motif wrote:.

Hi,what is the most common/useful ISO settings for vacation, meaningwater sports,wild life pictures etc?Just curious, because some cameras have noise starting at some ISOlevel,and wonder if I should care if camera has noise starting at e.g. 400ISO?.

Thanks..

Comment #1

Shoot the lowest I can, do you mean it's ok to use only e.g. 100 ISO for all pics?.

I guess I don't quite understand how ISO settings works and why I'd want to set it to e.g. 800..

I am thinking about FZ18 to buy now until 450D is released but I read about noise in this camera starting at 400ISO. I love it's lenses though and zoom.thanks..

Comment #2

Motif wrote:.

Shoot the lowest I can, do you mean it's ok to use only e.g. 100 ISOfor all pics?I guess I don't quite understand how ISO settings works and why I'dwant to set it to e.g. 800.I am thinking about FZ18 to buy now until 450D is released but I readabout noise in this camera starting at 400ISO. I love it's lensesthough and zoom.thanks.

ISO rating indicates the sensor's level of sensitivity to light. The lowest will produce the least amount of noise and is the preferred choice as long as you have enough light. But in low light you may not be able to set your parameters for proper exposure so you'll have to increase the ISO at the risk of noise which can be removed later in software..

Regards,Hank..

Comment #3

Motif wrote:.

Shoot the lowest I can, do you mean it's ok to use only e.g. 100 ISOfor all pics?.

I wouldn't do that as a blind rule of thumb because in some circumstances (e.g., low light scenes) your aperture setting may likely end up being too wide, and your shutter speed will likely end up to slow for what you're subject..

My aperture and shutter speed typically take precedence over ISO setting. That meaning, I may want to shoot at ISO 100, but I would not do so unless I can achieve the apertures and shutter speeds I want to shoot at. If I want to shoot at f/5.6 and 1/400s, then ISO 200 may give me a better exposure than ISO 100. ISO 100 might lead to overexposure in that situation. If ISO 100 allows a well-balanced exposure with f/5.6, 1/400s, then I could go ahead and shoot at ISO 100..

I guess I don't quite understand how ISO settings works and why I'dwant to set it to e.g. 800..

You just have to get some experience shooting at various ISOs in different settings to really grasp the understanding. Based on the way I shoot, ISO 100-200 is usually great for a perfectly sunny day. ISO 200-400 has been great for a partly-cloudy to cloudy day. And ISO 400-800 is what's best for me in indoor to low light situations. These may work for others, but everyone should find out what works best for them..

Take a look at this shot:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Nikon D80, Tamron 28-75mm F/2.8F/2.81/30sISO 1600Auto White Balance (accident)EV Comp. +3.67No sharpening or Post-Processing.

I wanted to take this shot at ISO 800, but there wasn't enough light. I had to cross my fingers and shoot at ISO 1600. I wouldn't have been able to shoot at ISO 800 because I'd have to sacrifice a stop elsewhere. I couldn't sacrifice a full stop through aperture because I was already maxed out at F/2.8. If I sacrificed it through shutter speed, then I'd have to shoot at 1/15s which wouldn't have done a great job of stopping motion. In addition, I was nearly maxed out on Exposure Compensation (EV Comp.)..

ISO 1600 actually turned out to be much better than I thought it would've. The singer there, even said, "Nice shots! That's a nice camera!" after I showed him the pics. There is noise in the picture, but it's no where near as bad as I expected it to be..

Brandon..

Comment #4

BDMYSTIFY wrote:.

ISO 100 might lead to overexposure in that situation..

I meant to say that it might lead to "UNDEREXPOSURE.".

Brandon..

Comment #5

BDMYSTIFY wrote:.

I wanted to take this shot at ISO 800, but there wasn't enough light.I had to cross my fingers and shoot at ISO 1600..

How did you know that was not enough light, experience or some spot metering?..

Comment #6

Motif wrote:.

BDMYSTIFY wrote:.

I wanted to take this shot at ISO 800, but there wasn't enough light.I had to cross my fingers and shoot at ISO 1600..

How did you know that was not enough light, experience or some spotmetering?.

Hahaha... good question!.

I didn't have much previous experience because I had only been a DSLR owner for a few weeks (at that time). I totally ignored the meter altogether and I used my intuition (and the histogram) instead. Never before had I shot in a low-lit concert with fluorescent lights that cycled through various colors of light. So, there was no "text book" way to shoot. I had to take an "educated guess.".

I knew there wasn't enough light because I took a few "TEST SHOTS" at ISO 800, and the images were way too dark. Simple "TRIAL AND ERROR" hardly ever fails! I actually remember presetting the camera to ISO 800 in the car knowing that I wanted to shoot at that setting. But obviously, conditions don't always occur the way you plan and you have to be ready to improvise..

I wanted to shoot with a moderately fast shutter speed, so that I could stop the onstage motion and to prevent too much blur. If I wanted to shoot at ISO 800, then I would've had to drop the shutter down to 1/15s, and I wasn't willing to compromise on that. But, I had to compromise somewhere and since shutter speed took precedence over ISO, I bumped it up to ISO 1600 (a full stop)..

Many photographers would've said, "Just use a flash use, and set the camera to ISO 800." But they don't realize that you can't just use a flash everywhere you want too, and many times the flash annoys people..

But the moral of the story is to ALWAYS take test shots when you can, and then adjust the settings accordingly to get the images to appear the way you want. You don't have to be a slave to the meter, and it's okay to use your own INTUITION sometimes. And always do your best to think things through with respect to exposure (i.e., shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and exposure compensation) before you shoot..

In addition to that, understand how to read the HISTOGRAM, and pay attention to it when you shoot. If the peak of the histogram is too far on the left, then you know that your images are probably too dark and underexposed. If the peak of the histogram is too far on the right, then you know that your images are probably too bright and overexposed. If either of these is the case, then you will have to change an exposure setting. If the peak of the histogram is near the middle of the histogram, then you'll have a more balanced exposure..

Brandon..

Comment #7

Depending on light and whether your subject is standing still or moving fast..

Http://lordofthelens.co.nz/..

Comment #8

In other words, shoot at the lowest ISO you can as long as you can get a decent exposure. Upping the ISO is primarily for when you can no longer get enough light within the constraints of the shutter speed and f number that you have chosen. The shutter speed is generally constrained by freezing motion, ability to hand hold, etc. The f number is generally constrained by getting adequate depth of field or minimizing lens distortion, aberrations, etc. at lower f numbers.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #9

Motif wrote:.

What is the most common/useful ISO settings for vacation, meaningwater sports,wild life pictures etc?Just curious, because some cameras have noise starting at some ISOlevel,and wonder if I should care if camera has noise starting at e.g. 400ISO?.

You indicated an interest in the FZ18, and for your intended use, I don't think you'll have a high ISO issue. The review on this site indicates that even at full zoom, the image stabilization feature allows consistently sharp pictures down to about 1/160 second shutter speeds, and a pretty good hit rate even at 1/80. The vast majority of daytime, outdoor shots are in light with an exposure value between 15 (subjects in bright sun) and 11 (sunsets, subjects in shade). The fast lens of the FZ18 means that within that EV range, ISO 100 should allow handholdable shutter speeds at every focal length..

While I would follow Martin's advice and just stay at ISO 100, should circumstances dictate a need for a little more speed, you can likely go a bit above ISO 100 without undue loss. Imaging Resource found print quality at ISO 100 to be very good up to 11 X 14 inches; ISO 400 shots made good 8 X 10's, and ISO's of 800 and 1250 held up pretty well at 5 X 7..

Steve's digicams concluded in their review that the FZ18 "will make a great choice for anyone in the market for a versatile 8-megapixel digicam, especially if they are planing on a vacation that entails lots sport, wildlife, or portrait photography."..

Comment #10

So another words in regular prints with good light on PC or TV I will not notice the difference between pictures taken with e.g. FZ18 and dSLR cameras?.

Also does it mean that such camera like FZ18 is horrible in low light situations?.

Thanks all for clarifications about that ISO settings, although not sure yet why with increasing sensitivity of the sensor noise is introduced...

Comment #11

Motif wrote:.

Hi,what is the most common/useful ISO settings for vacation, meaningwater sports,wild life pictures etc?Just curious, because some cameras have noise starting at some ISOlevel,and wonder if I should care if camera has noise starting at e.g. 400ISO?.

Thanks..

Comment #12

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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