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More pics, comments/suggestions welcome (8 images)
I went out shooting around my college campus today, and tried to keep some of the previous comments in mind. I think I did a little better than last time with overexposing, but I'm not sure I did so well with DOF - my camera AF seems to be a fan of focusing the entire scene, even when I try to pick a subject..

These were shot with my 5 year old Olympus C-4000, in manual mode..

ISO 100, most of the exposures that I think worked on the building were around f5.0, 1/500 or faster, with some compensation that the camera did automatically. I don't remember what I used on the bush..

How did I do? Thanks in advance for helping me!.

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Http://www.flickr.com/photos/jbphotogrl/..

Comments (6)

1. Except II, there is not much to comment for. Not sure what you wanted to capture. II is OK compositionally..

2. First learn to compose. At least try to keep things straight (I am sure tilt in building photos was not intentional).Some learning links;http://www.azuswebworks.com/photography/ph_comp.htmlhttp://www.photoxels.com/digital-photography-tutorials.html.

3. Post the pictures in "Samples & Galleries" Forum, which is meant for such purposes.Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #1

I too am not quite sure of what effects you're looking for with these shots?.

I don't know why you've gone for the shallow DoF in the 'bushes' shots, or why you've got the building(s) leaning at bizarre angles  or is that intentional?.

The long shots of the bushes don't have any cohesive subject material that I can recognise  in other words, what are they meant to be pictures *of*. I'm also thinking it'd be better if you backed away from the buildings and zoomed in a bit, rather than locating yourself (as I'm only guessing here) too close to them. Although you could use keystone correction and rotation in PS to correct this if necessary..

In my humble opinion, you always need to create immediate viewer "interest" in your pictures (by whatever means) and I apologise in advance for saying that these pix are just boring  sorry..

Think carefully about the end product composition-wise, and remember that the human eye captures a lot more of the image (including peripheral vision) than does the camera  both from a purely visual viewpoint and also an "atmospheric" viewpoint. Your job is to try and recapture that atmosphere, and highlight your chosen subject(s) so that they stand out. The picture has to 'grab' you..

Cheers ..

Comment #2

I can't figure out what you are taking pictures of so I'll assume these are exposure tests or you are trying out features on your camera. If you can't tell that some of those are badly overexposed then buy a new monitor. Try and take pictures of more multi-colored scenes with some detail for testing your camera. Both your choices are kind of monochromatic...

Comment #3

These pictures were mostly exposure tests. I was trying to follow some of the advice I received on the tree pictures I posted a few days ago, and I was also trying to not overexpose as badly as I did on the tree pictures. Apparently I failed in that attempt..

Just so we're clear on my level of experience, I have done photography before, but I've been away from manual mode and photography as a hobby for a few years, and I'm just now starting to try to remember this stuff, so while I am definitely asking for help and advice, please bear with me if I'm progressing slowly..

If I remember/am getting this right, overexposed means too much light. So I tried to use higher apertures and faster shutterspeeds to gather less light, should I be upping them further than I did? Is there more I should be looking at? What about ISO, for outdoor with bright sunlight do I want higher or lower ISO?.

As for composition, I'll try to work on that too, but these pictures were mostly exposure tests, except for the bush with the leaf in/on it.http://www.flickr.com/photos/jbphotogrl/..

Comment #4

Jboschan wrote:.

These pictures were mostly exposure tests. I was trying to followsome of the advice I received on the tree pictures I posted a fewdays ago, and I was also trying to not overexpose as badly as I didon the tree pictures. Apparently I failed in that attempt..

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The exif data shows the following:1/320 sec f/5 ISO 1001/800 sec f/5 ISO 100..

I believe the camera you are using has a histogram feature. You may find that useful in helping to judge whether or not the exposure is correct. Because it is built into the camera, you can check the results while shooting, and make adjustments at the time.Here are some histograms corresponding to the two pictures above:.

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This is the first one, notice how the graph is all bunched to the right of the screen, indicating a lot of very bright tones. That is from the first, very overexposed picture..

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The second one shows a more even distribution, and importantly it is not squashed to the left or right edge, indicating a balanced exposure. To be honest, the building looks a little over-exposed (too bright) to my eyes, but it may depend what you are trying to achieve. For example, do you want to show the outside brickwork, or the glass doorway in the shadow area?.

You may need to refer to the manual to find how to bring up the histogram on the actual camera. It will have two separate modes of operation: 1. to show the histogram of a picture after you have taken it, and 2. to show the live histogram of the scene as viewed through the lens before the shutter is pressed.Hope this gives you a pointer as to something to try next.Regards,Peter..

Comment #5

Http://www.pbase.com/ericsorensen/image/52955921/original.

From this forum under 'your DSLR settings'. This chart explains a lot about the basic of exposure..

As far as getting critique and comments, try only posting the photo YOU think is best, then asking for comments. Include a title or short description so we know what you were going for. As far as subject matter, try and pick a subject you think is interesting and compose the shot. That way you can get comments on composition and exposure...

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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