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Monitors -- Is what you see, what you get ?
I have not yet gone digital, but hope to soon. Scenario: I'm looking at the monitor of my digital camera, and I snap the picture. Question: When I print out the picture, will it exactly match what I saw on the camera's monitor? In other words, can I trust a camera's monitor to show me exactly what a picture will look like when printed? Along the same lines: if I'm looking at the camera's monitor and suddenly decide to change the f/stop or speed or whatever, will the image on the monitor reflect those changes? Is "what you see, what you get"? Thanks for any input...

Comments (13)

Changing the f-Stop, etc should have no difference from what see in monitor vs. camera; other than the LCD on your camera might be too small to see all the details..

Color management and the subject of what you see on the monitor vs. what you see in prints involve the following subjects:.

- Monitor Calibration- Printer Paper Profiles- Paper Quality.

If you search in the printer forum and the PC/Mac forum you will see a lot of discussion on these topics..

Also, go to this website and read the relevant articles under "Featured Articles and Essays.".

Http://www.computer-darkroom.com/home.htm.

Have fun..

Johnnyhttp://tuxbailey.zenfolio.com..

Comment #1

Artisticphotography wrote:.

Can I trust a camera's monitor to show me exactly what a picturewill look like when printed?.

No. The camera's LCD display is primarily for composition purposes. The picture shown there will be similar to what you will get on a print, but there will be differences..

If I'm looking at the camera's monitor and suddenly decideto change the f/stop or speed or whatever,will the image on the monitor reflect those changes?.

It depends on the camera. For most controls on most digicams, the answer is "no". Again, the LCD display is primarily for composition purposes..

Most digicams are pretty much always used in autoexposure anyway. And on most digital SLRs the LCD display generally cannot be used for previewing a shot at all. A few DSLRs do allow this, although with some fairly significant usage limitations...

Comment #2

Have you ever visited a television store, with a wall of television sets tuned to the same channel, with a wide variety of tones and colors from set to set?.

Same principle in photography, printers, inks, monitors, etc..

BAK..

Comment #3

On all but a few dslrs the lcd will show what you took after the shot, not before..

One way a lcd that does show what you are shooting demonstrates why you cannot use a lcd to judge what image will look like ism to use the camera at night. the lcd is lit up somewhat while the scene is not. this applies to p&s only..

Even during the day a p&s digicam's lcd will gain up or down depending on the lighting conditions. dark shadow, shade, sun, etc...

Comment #4

Thanks to everyone for their replies. You all seem to be saying that what you see on a camera's monitor is not necessarily what you will get when you print out a photo. So, based on that and the fact that one must decide whether to delete (or keep) a photo after they preview it on the monitor how can one make a sound judgment (whether to delete or not) when one cannot see what the actual photo will look like when printed out? Seems like a lot of guesswork. What should I be looking for when I preview a photo on the monitor? Thanks...

Comment #5

I missed the camera part. I was saying that what you see in the computer might not be the same as what you will print. As for the camera's LCD display, you usually just get a rough idea of the overall picture when it print. I think you should not depend solely on the camera's LCD as an indicator of the output. Johnnyhttp://tuxbailey.zenfolio.com..

Comment #6

The LCD will give you a good idea of what to expect, and most decent cameras (DSLR, bridges and high end P&S) will in addition give you an histogram, and show under and over exposed parts of the image if you want. You can also adjust color in post processing if you want, no big deal.It's much much better than what you got with film....

Artisticphotography wrote:.

Thanks to everyone for their replies. You all seem to be saying thatwhat you see on a camera's monitor is not necessarily what you willget when you print out a photo. So, based on that and the factthat one must decide whether to delete (or keep) a photo after theypreview it on the monitor how can one make a sound judgment(whether to delete or not) when one cannot see what the actual photowill look like when printed out? Seems like a lot of guesswork.What should I be looking for when I preview a photo on the monitor?Thanks...

Comment #7

Artisticphotography wrote:.

Thanks to everyone for their replies. You all seem to be saying thatwhat you see on a camera's monitor is not necessarily what you willget when you print out a photo. So, based on that and the factthat one must decide whether to delete (or keep) a photo after theypreview it on the monitor how can one make a sound judgment(whether to delete or not) when one cannot see what the actual photowill look like when printed out? Seems like a lot of guesswork.What should I be looking for when I preview a photo on the monitor?Thanks..

I would never put myself into the position of having to delete a shot based on viewing it on camera. Have a second memory card so I don't run out of storage and wait until you can download the pic's to your computer where you can open each shot at full resolution before deciding to delete or not... Same for printing, I have several small memory cards I copy shots to before heading off to get prints made..

...Dennis..

Comment #8

Artisticphotography wrote:.

... So, based on that and the factthat one must decide whether to delete (or keep) a photo after theypreview it on the monitor....

No you don't. Your assumption that you "must" make this decision based on the camera LCD view is causing you to worry about something that you really don't need to..

The only pictures I would delete based on the camera LCD view would the ones that were obvious disasters - and even then, I'd only bother if I was desparate for memory card space (and didn't cae as much about wasting the battery with all that reviewing)..

Use the camera monitor to check exposure etc. Don't use it to cull your pictures; save that for later on your computer..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #9

The LCD on the camera is just for compositional review, and data readouts. The only thing you can really use it for is to see whether you need to take another shot due to some gross error in your FRAMING of the shot: the subject blinked or your thumb got in the way or Nessie hid under the water at the moment you squeezed the trigger..

The LCD will often allow you to zoom in, but even that isn't good for checking focus because you often zoom in using a low-res copy of the image, not the image as saved to the card. Don't judge anything more than the grossest level of focus by the LCD..

The LCD will often stretch contrast to fill the color range, which is like adding MSG to food: it might taste better than the real food, but it's in a cheap and artificial way. This lets you see your image more clearly in bright sunlight, and the colors look more saturated than real life. Whether you actually get (or want) that effect permanently applied to your image should be reviewed on a bigger screen when you get home..

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #10

Artisticphotography wrote:.

I have not yet gone digital, but hope to soon. Scenario: I'mlooking at the monitor of my digital camera, and I snap the picture.Question: When I print out the picture, will it exactly match what Isaw on the camera's monitor? In other words, can I trust a camera'smonitor to show me exactly what a picture will look like whenprinted?.

The camera is pretty honest, although tiny monitors can disguise the fact that your shot may be slightly blurred, whether due to focus issues or camera shake. That is why I like to zoom in on important shots while reviewing them on that little monitor. It will not lie. However, if you are taking a longer exposure, you will not see any deliberate motion blur in advance of taking the shot..

Along the same lines: if I'm looking at the camera'smonitor and suddenly decide to change the f/stop or speed orwhatever, will the image on the monitor reflect those changes?.

It may depend on how the camera is programmed. Some cameras don't show the effect of flash, for instance. Most non-dSLR's will show you the effect of your settings in real time, before you take the shot. It is a great advantage of digicams..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #11

Artisticphotography wrote:.

I have not yet gone digital, but hope to soon. Scenario: I'mlooking at the monitor of my digital camera, and I snap the picture..

If your camera HAS a monitor .

Question: When I print out the picture, will it exactly match what Isaw on the camera's monitor?.

No.

In other words, can I trust a camera'smonitor to show me exactly what a picture will look like whenprinted?.

No.

Along the same lines: if I'm looking at the camera'smonitor and suddenly decide to change the f/stop or speed orwhatever, will the image on the monitor reflect those changes?.

Usually not. Most of the times, actually..

Is"what you see, what you get"? Thanks for any input..

Well, you'll get what you have on your display AFTER shooting the image. Now, that's NOT what you have. In other words, if you print the image at the size of the display, you'll get roughly what you see - except for the colours..

The proper technique is to KNOW what you'll get and use the viewfinder/display to help framing..

/d/n..

Comment #12

Artisticphotography wrote:.

Thanks to everyone for their replies. You all seem to be saying thatwhat you see on a camera's monitor is not necessarily what you willget when you print out a photo..

You'll never get what you see on the display - unless you print at the display size. And still won't get exactly that..

So, based on that and the factthat one must decide whether to delete (or keep) a photo after theypreview it on the monitor how can one make a sound judgment(whether to delete or not) when one cannot see what the actual photowill look like when printed out?.

Bad hypothesis. Don't erase pictures in camera. Buy more memory - it's cheap. You can't properly judge DOF, focus, crispness and color on the display..

Seems like a lot of guesswork..

Well... there ARE some things you can see. For example, if a camera strap, hair, or breathing vapor are in the picture. If a bus passed between you and your landscape. If the horizon is tilted. If aunt Edna hasn't blinked.

If the exposure is proper. If the exposure time is proper - for example when you want movement in your picture - such as an waterfall..

What should I be looking for when I preview a photo on the monitor?.

When PREviewing? as in "before shooting"? Composition and light. After, the list I made above.

Thanks..

Good luck!.

/d/n..

Comment #13

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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