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Misty rainforest photo
I'm going to do shooting this weekend at a mountain and misty rainforest photos are something that I'd definitely take..

Any special tips for that? Do I need any polarized filter? Is it appropriate to take photo at manual photo with focus set to infinity? Thank you guys...

Comments (6)

Skthew wrote:.

I'm going to do shooting this weekend at a mountain and mistyrainforest photos are something that I'd definitely take..

Any special tips for that? Do I need any polarized filter? Is itappropriate to take photo at manual photo with focus set to infinity?Thank you guys..

A polarizing filter is normally used in bright sunshine to eliminate glare and reflections from shiny surfaces (sand, snow, water, leaves...). A mist rainforest is about the least appropriate place to use one: it will just cut out a lot of light (1 - 2 stops) in a situation where it will probably be dim to start with. Don't bother..

Yes, it would be appropriate to set the focus to infinity manually... if the thing you are photographing is a long way off and lies within the depth of field. But assuming that your camera has autofocus, why would you need to do this? One possible reason could be to avoid the autofocus getting confused by things near to the camera at the edge, e.g. a branch protruding into the field of view. If the autofocus picks this up and focusses on the branch, when you really wanted the background to be in focus, then your background will be blurred. So to avoid this you can manual focus to infinity - or just make sure that the autofocus has selected a distant object before you shoot..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #1

Thanks Mike for the thorough explanation..

Another question, for landscape photo, what's the recommended F-stop setting? Is it better to use Apperture Priority mode rather than Program Setting?..

Comment #2

Another question, for landscape photo, what's the recommended F-stopsetting? Is it better to use Apperture Priority mode rather thanProgram Setting?.

For a landscape you generally want a high depth of field to get both foreground and background in focus. You get greater depth of field with a narrow aperture like f/11, and also with a wider angler lens..

Have a look at the depth of field calculator athttp://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html.

Suppose you are using a standard crop-sensor DSLR like the Canon rebel XTi. if you set the zoom to 20mm (quite wide angle) and the aperture to f/11 and focus on something 10 feet away you will see that everything from about 4 feet to infinity will be in focus, so focussing accurately is not critical as basically everything will be in focus/.

Conversely with the same lens at 55mm and f/5.6, focussed at 10 feet, only things from 9 - 11 feet will be in focus. In this case you need more carefully to focus on something closer to infinity to ensure that the background is not blurred. if you manually focussed at infinity you would get a depth of field from about 80 feet to infinity..

So you want a narrow aperture... but not so narrow that the shutter speed is too long and you get camera shake. There is no point having a high depth of field by using f/11 if the shutter speed ends up at 1/15 second and your picture is blurred. In such a case you are better to use 1/60 sec at f/5.6 and focus carefully on the part of the picture you want to be in focus..

I would recommend using aperture priority, but just check that your shutter speeds remain fast enough for hand holding. if necessary increase the ISO..

Best wishes.

Mike..

Comment #3

Thanks Mike for the great explanation!.

But one thing that I quite respect though is the fact that professional photographers are able to calculate the DOF and hence come out with the right settings, say you're taking photo of a bunch of ppl with say 2-3 lines and 2 person standing 10 meters in front and to ensure that these objects are well focused too (unlike a photo that I take not long ago, in which 7 of them are standing in a line with the person standing at the center is well focused while the rest appeared to be blur  ..)..

Any tips for that, on at least how to get an optimal F-setting?..

Comment #4

Skthew wrote:.

Thanks Mike for the great explanation!.

But one thing that I quite respect though is the fact thatprofessional photographers are able to calculate the DOF and hencecome out with the right settings, say you're taking photo of a bunchof ppl with say 2-3 lines and 2 person standing 10 meters in frontand to ensure that these objects are well focused too (unlike a photothat I take not long ago, in which 7 of them are standing in a linewith the person standing at the center is well focused while the restappeared to be blur  ..)..

Any tips for that, on at least how to get an optimal F-setting?.

Once you have had some experience you get to know what sort of f/stop to use when. But in the situation you describe, a professional photographer (or any other) would just estimate an aperture, take a test photo, and check it on the LCD display - if not everything is in focus, use a narrower aperture..

Some cameras have a 'depth of field preview' mode which allows you to view the escene wit the lens stopped down before you take the pic so you can see for yourself how it will look. I never found this very useful because at f/11 the view through the viewfinder is very dim. Much easier to take a test shot, look at it carefully, and adjust aperture if necessary..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #5

Thanks Mike. By the way, nice knowing you here and thanks for the help..

Can I've your email address? Thanks and cheers!..

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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