snubbr.com

Metering type?
I have an XSi and, for some reason, have been using spot metering for the past few days (only got it last week). But I am wondering if I should be using mainly evaluative metering or another type. If so, when should I use spot metering? When should I use the other types?.

Thanks for reading!..

Comments (18)

Spot metering works great for situations where your subject varies greatly from the average scene. A wide meter would give an exposure for the average of the scene area that it is measuring, but the exposure would be off for the main part of the subject..

If your subject is within the average of the scene the averaging metering will probably work..

If you think that makes sense, then you must have read someone else's post!..

Comment #1

NiMH wrote:.

I have an XSi and, for some reason, have been using spot metering forthe past few days (only got it last week). But I am wondering if Ishould be using mainly evaluative metering or another type. If so,when should I use spot metering? When should I use the other types?.

Thanks for reading!.

Spot metering requires that you exercise some manual control over your exposure (e.g. by keying in some exposure compensation)..

In order to do this properly, you should preferably have some understanding of how exposure works, so that you can make the "right" adjustments to the exposure suggested by the spot metering. A good place to start is the "Zone System". (Google up "Zone System")..

Comment #2

Mikelis wrote:.

NiMH wrote:.

I have an XSi and, for some reason, have been using spot metering forthe past few days (only got it last week). But I am wondering if Ishould be using mainly evaluative metering or another type. If so,when should I use spot metering? When should I use the other types?.

Thanks for reading!.

Spot metering requires that you exercise some manual control overyour exposure (e.g. by keying in some exposure compensation)..

In order to do this properly, you should preferably have someunderstanding of how exposure works, so that you can make the "right"adjustments to the exposure suggested by the spot metering. A goodplace to start is the "Zone System". (Google up "Zone System").

I have to agree with this. However, there's some short cuts..

First, understand that the meter in a camera meters properly on a 15% or 18% neutral density gray card (depending on who you talk to). So, if you were taking a picture of a gray wall then it should be a perfectly exposed gray wall. Knowing this, if you pointed your camera at an 18% gray card that was in the same light as your subject, then used that setting for the subject, your image should be properly exposed. The problem is carrying around an 18% gray card with you..

Here's the short cut. Put your camera on spot metering and meter green grass outside. Green grass tends to be 18% gray. Your hand is one stop brighter than 18% gray. So meter off the grass or your hand and close a stop and you're right on most of the time, providing the grass or hand was in the same light as the subject..

For example, when shooting birds in flight, it's darn tough because the sky around that little bird is so bright that your camera has to darken it to 18% gray. The bird then becomes almost black. Moreover, it's hard to spot meter a fast moving bird. If you miss the bird, you're metering sky again. So, you aim that spot meter at your hand in the shade, if the birds bottom is in the shade, regardless that the top is in the sun. Close a stop, because your hand is one stop bright, and set the camera to that manually.



Think of all the other examples where you might spot meter grass, hold the shutter half down and recompose on your subject..

When you use some form of average metering, you're hoping that the average of all the light and dark items being metered averages to 18% neutral density gray. That often isn't true..

This can become zone-system made easy, well sort of easy..

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #3

Light MeteringTechnique - Technique.

LIGHT METERINGTopics:The basics of metering systemsAll around metering modesExamples for:Spot or Partial MeteringCenter-weighted MeteringMatrix or Multi-zone Metering.

Http://www.photozone.de/Technique.

Bill,Jr'I kind of like the Earth, it's where I keep all my Stuff.'Website; http://www.pbase.com/wboth125 Lake Wylie, SC..

Comment #4

Guidenet wrote:.

Here's the short cut. Put your camera on spot metering and metergreen grass outside. Green grass tends to be 18% gray. Your hand isone stop brighter than 18% gray. So meter off the grass or your handand close a stop and you're right on most of the time, providing thegrass or hand was in the same light as the subject..

Cheers, Craig.

Craig is giving good advice, but it just goes to show how easy it is to "screw up" once you leave the security of AE..

Spot metering your hand results in an exposure that renders your hand as 18% grey (in the picture, as captured). But your hand is actually one stop "brighter" than 18% grey (if you're a Caucasian)..

So: in order to get the "right rendering", you have to OPEN UP one stop (not close down, as closing down would actually render you hand as two stops below what it should be)..

It can get confusing at the best of times, can't it? ..

Comment #5

Wow this is a lot more in-depth than I thought. I guess it's time for some more reading. Thanks for all the tips!..

Comment #6

One example of when to use spot metering is for a backlit subject. You could spot meter their face (assuming your subject is a person) and in effect expose for the face rather than for the background...

Comment #7

NiMH wrote:.

I have an XSi and, for some reason, have been using spot metering forthe past few days (only got it last week). But I am wondering if Ishould be using mainly evaluative metering or another type. If so,when should I use spot metering? When should I use the other types?.

Unless you spend most of your time photographing difficult subjects like BIF use evaluative metering 99% of the time and Spot for that difficult 1%..

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #8

LOL.. you're right..

I wasn't paying attention. In the old slide days I used to meter off my hand and not open a stop in bright sunlight, leaving it one stop down for saturation. Oh well, thanks for the heads up..

One more thing. I remember in Nikon School sometime in the late 1960s, if I remember, one of the instructors was a black photographer for the NFL. He said that his palm read 18% just like white photographer's hands. .

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #9

Hi,.

Well, if you're using spot metering all the time I'd say you've been very lucky or else the "spot" is rather wide and you're using centre weighted..

Spot and CW other overlap between makes and models. There's no law that says 1 or is spot metering and 10 is CW. And a lot of makers confuse the issue by not telling..

BTW, to get the best out of spot metering (using my idea of what spot means (1)), you need to take a series of readings, write them down and think a bit. Getting it right first time on just one quick reading suggest luck - as I said..

Strange how no one ever mention incident light reading these days. Yet you can buy a good enough exposure meter on ebay for a few pounds these days..

Regards, David..

Comment #10

Edit : may need some exposure comp, +1 for lighter skin and -1/3 or more for darker skiin...

Comment #11

It may be in depth but not necessarily right..

And overly complicated..

Your camera has four exposure modes. Use the three that are not spot metering until you get a really good idea how exposure metering works..

The ONLY time for you to use spot metring, until you've gained lots more experience, is if the vast majority of the frame is much brighter, or much darker, than the subject..

BAK..

Comment #12

There are tons of articles around the Web on selecting metering modes. I won't bother to repeat what's in those..

First: in this digital age, many people choose to use a process of take a shot, chimp the histogram, adjust the exposure and retake the shot. If you do that, then it doesn't really matter what metering mode you choose. The metering mode only matters as far as getting your first attempt right..

Second: evaluative metering doesn't work very well with single-point AF, or with manual focus. It is designed to work with "auto AF point selection", also known as having all AF points active. The AF points that locked are used to determine the size and position of the subject, and using a single AF point misleads the evaluative metering system. Many people don't notice because they're using the "chimp and retry" technique. See this posting for an example of how evaluative metering can go wrong with single-point AF:http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=26806531.

Third: there are various ways of using Partial/Spot metering. One way is to meter a specific subject. Another way is to meter something that you judge to be a midtone. Another way is to meter both the brightest and the darkest areas, to select an exposure that covers boththis is usually used with manual exposure. Each requires a different technique..

Fourth: the modes other than evaluative all meter the center of the image (centerweighted average also gives some consideration to the rest of the image). But most people don't like their subjects to be centered in the picture. If you're using automatic exposure (anything except M mode), the AE Lock button (*) is probably going to become a close friend..

Fifth: in the end, what matters is "what works for you". Different people have different styles. Some use evaluative metering and let the camera do the thinking. Some chimp and reshoot. Some use AE Lock and recompose. Some use Exposure Compensation.

Find what suits *you*...

Comment #13

Doug Pardee wrote:.

Second: evaluative metering doesn't work very well with single-pointAF, or with manual focus. It is designed to work with "auto AF pointselection", also known as having all AF points active..

Is this true of Nikon dslrs as well?.

Edit: Is Nikon's matrix metering the equivalent of Canon's Evaluative?, I assumed it was in my question...

Comment #14

Guidenet:.

"Think of all the other examples where you might spot meter grass, hold the shutter half down and recompose on your subject.".

When you hold the shutter half way down won't it also focus in addition to setting the exposure? So when you recompose how will the subject be in focus?A beginner in the middle of the book, Exposure,Hank..

Comment #15

If you have a dslr with and auto focus/auto exposure lock button you can separate the af from the ae when pressing the shutter. You'll have to check your manual on how to set this up. Mary..

Comment #16

David Hughes wrote:.

BTW, to get the best out of spot metering (using my idea of what spotmeans (1)), you need to take a series of readings, write them downand think a bit. Getting it right first time on just one quickreading suggest luck - as I said..

Regards, David.

David,.

You can simplify spot reading down to:.

Decide which is the brightest highlight you want to keep (or the deepest shadow) read one or the other using your spot-meter, adjust your aperture/shutter speed accordingly, and shoot..

All the other "tonalities" will fall into place automatically..

I do this all the time with my film cameras and no problems: excellent exposures every time!..

Comment #17

If you read your manual you'll see that your XSi implementation of the spot meter, isn't a true spot meter but rather a smaller center weighted meter... It clearly defines this as a Weighted Spot which means it is considering other aspects of the frame for metering..

Now the ideal if you ask me is to use Center Weighted most of the time as it pretty much gets your subject pretty close to what you're looking for....

Use Spot whenever you want precise metering (kind of hard when the spot meter isn't true)....

Then experiment with Evaluative to see when it works best for you, as most likely isn't ideal for all situations..

NiMH wrote:.

I have an XSi and, for some reason, have been using spot metering forthe past few days (only got it last week). But I am wondering if Ishould be using mainly evaluative metering or another type. If so,when should I use spot metering? When should I use the other types?.

Thanks for reading!.

'The probability that we may fall in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just; it shall not deter me.' Abraham Lincoln..

Comment #18

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.