snubbr.com

Matrix-metering question
If MM average out all the light, wouldn't that mean there are always areas in the final picture that, exposure wise, doesn't look like what your eyes saw when taking the pic?..

Comments (7)

No photo looks like what the scene looked like with our eyes. Dynamic range is off, color perception is different, printing or display technology intrudes, resolution is weak. Nuff said..

But it sounds like you're confusing what "metering" does. All that any kind of metering achieves is deciding a single exposure value. The exposure value is then used to decide aperture and shutter time values (and sometimes sensitivity value too). Metering can't change one part of the image differently. A metering system can notice a small bright spot in one part of the image and decide to stop down the whole exposure to avoid clipping. The whole exposure looks darker, not just the bright spot..

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #1

Linslus wrote:.

If MM average out all the light, wouldn't that mean there are alwaysareas in the final picture that, exposure wise, doesn't look likewhat your eyes saw when taking the pic?.

Matrix metering is a bit more complicated than that as it tries to make a sensible guess about which areas of the picture are more important, and bias the exposure towards those, so it is not just an 'average'..

But, yes, you are correct. The response of a camera is not the same as the response of your eyes. Your eye opens / closes according to the brightness of what you are looking at, so effectively it gives a different exposure to different parts of a scene, something a camera cannot do. You can read a book comfortably either in bright sunlight or using a weak incandescent desk lamp which is many thousands of times dimmer. The result is that your eye has a much higher dynamic range than a camera, able to see highlight detail and dark shadow detail in the same scene, which a camera cannot: if you expose for the highlights the shadow will be black, and if you expose for shadows the highlights will be burnt out with no detail..

Also, your eye automatically adjusts for white balance: you do not perceive room light from incandescent lamps as being very yellow, or shady daylight as being very blue, in the way that a camera does..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #2

Would it be possible for cameras in the near future to meter different exposure for different parts of the scene? Is this something the researchers are working on?..

Comment #3

I think some of the newer fuji compacts do something along those lines..

Even if you were to capture what the eye sees you'd never be able to show it because your computer moniter and photo printer both have a smaller dynamic range than the camera already..

If you want to capture the entire range of a scene you can use multi exposures and combine them to make a HDR photo..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #4

Its very hard to do with a mechanical shutter such as in an DSLR. You could do it with an electronic shutter though, but this will take software to blend together exposures to avoid having a blocky look..

Plus blur issues will be very apparent in longer exposure "cells". It is an interesting idea though.

Linslus wrote:.

Would it be possible for cameras in the near future to meterdifferent exposure for different parts of the scene? Is thissomething the researchers are working on?..

Comment #5

Don't forget your brain plays an important part in how you perceive a scene. It stitches together many things you look at to arrive at what you remember. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for a camera to come close to what the eye and brain are capable of..

Good photographers analyze the essence of a scene and try to highlight that essence in their photographs. It's not about making a literal copy of a three dimensional scene on a two dimensional media. It's about conveying a feeling or impression..

Not exactly technically perfect, but it captures the essence..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #6

Yeah, it's here already, sort of. The newer Nikons have I think it's called Adaptive D-Lighting or some such thing. I believe it exposes for the highlights and brings up the shadows to suit.

Linslus wrote:.

Would it be possible for cameras in the near future to meterdifferent exposure for different parts of the scene? Is thissomething the researchers are working on?..

Comment #7

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.