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Manual vs Tv or Av
I have a 40D (moved up from G7) - and am doing most shooting in manual with ISO 100 or 200, and balancing speed/f-stop for clear shot and the right exposure..

As I shoot outdoors mostly with widely varying light levels - am I making my harder than necessary by doing it in manual? [I don't like the auto results so I don't use that much.].

Most results are clear but it takes me several shots to get the exposure right..

Would I be better off going with Av mode?.

Thanks...

Comments (6)

As I shoot outdoors mostly with widely varying light levels - am Imaking my harder than necessary by doing it in manual? [I don't likethe auto results so I don't use that much.].

Most results are clear but it takes me several shots to get theexposure right..

Would I be better off going with Av mode?.

Possibly..

When you say you dont like the auto results, try to establish what is different about what you choose and what the camera chooses in one of the auto modes,.

Once you have set it manually to give the expsoure you like, switch to auto and note what the camera would have chosen. Do this a few times and you may see a pattern emerging.

If your manual choices are for example consistantly, say, 1 stop more exposed than the auto setting it's easy to set the camera to do this for you using exposure compensation..

I have a Nikon D200 and find the metering very good. I usually use Av mode only going to manual for a tricky lighting situation that may fool the meter, small dark subject surrounded by white background, for example..

I could use exp Compensation but keep forgetting to reset it, switching to manual and back to Av mode when finished dosn't have that problem..

Bob..

Comment #1

Sam_1 wrote:.

I have a 40D (moved up from G7) - and am doing most shooting inmanual with ISO 100 or 200, and balancing speed/f-stop for clear shotand the right exposure..

As I shoot outdoors mostly with widely varying light levels - am Imaking my harder than necessary by doing it in manual? [I don't likethe auto results so I don't use that much.].

Most results are clear but it takes me several shots to get theexposure right..

Would I be better off going with Av mode?.

If you're not getting the exposure you want in auto, then it's unlikely you'll be any happier with Av. Taking several shots to get the right exposure is fine; one of the nice advantages of digital over film is basically free trial-and-error shooting. I would encourage you to continue with manual and stick to one metering pattern until you are very comfortable with how your camera reacts in varying situations..

My personal preference is spot metering since multiple readings make it easy to see the tonal range of the scene, balance exposure of light and dark areas, or simply pick one object that I know I want to be a particular tonal value. As you gain experience with how your camera's meter operates, you'll be taking fewer shots to get the exposures you like best. If you haven't read any articles on the Zone System, the following link could prove useful:.

Http://www.normankoren.com/zonesystem.html..

Comment #2

1. Yes. It will save time. Use exposure compensation to go with it, if needed. That way you will have less chance of total loss..

2. Just assess the general lighting condition of the scene. Whether it is having too much contrast (bright sunny day), backlit, foggy (less contrast) etc. Decide exposure compensation based on that..

Sam_1 wrote:.

Would I be better off going with Av mode?.

Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #3

I have a 40D (moved up from G7) - and am doing most shooting inmanual with ISO 100 or 200, and balancing speed/f-stop for clear shotand the right exposure..

As I shoot outdoors mostly with widely varying light levels - am Imaking my harder than necessary by doing it in manual? [I don't likethe auto results so I don't use that much.].

Most results are clear but it takes me several shots to get theexposure right..

Would I be better off going with Av mode?.

Thanks..

It's slightly surprising that you are getting poor results in auto mode - the most important issue is to understand why this is. If you are shooting outdoors mostly it is possible that you are getting a lot of sky in the picture, which is brighter than the foreground - if the meter sees this it will reduce the exposure to compensate and your subject will be underexposed. if this happens you would get the same result in any automatic mode (Av or Tv)..

It sound as though you have been getting around this by setting the camera to manual and just changing things until you get a properly exposed picture. That will always work (but be a little time consuming). If you just point the camera down and take a meter reading off the ground, with no sky in the picture, that should be about right. You can then set this manually, or use the exposure lock button so that when you re-compose the picture correctly (with sky in it) the exposure won't change. Having a patch of bright sky can easily make a difference of over 1 stop..

Sorry if this is too obvious but it does sound like a possibility..

Best wishes,Mike..

Comment #4

For bright outdoors, I use Av set around the sweet spot (f4 - f5.6, depending on the lens), and let the camera choose the proper shutter speed for the appropriate exposure, then compensate +/- EV, or metering for extreme DR..

I've had great results for sports/action using Av but then I'll set the Av to it's widest aperture to get the fastest shutter speed. Tv only used for slow shutter speeds for night scenes or waterfalls. M for specific situations or effects.Regards,Hank.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

What exactly is it about the auto selections that you don't like. Is the exposure wrong, or do you not like the selected aperture (and resulting DOF)?.

Dialing in some exposure compensation is a routine part of life with a DSLR. You'll find a value that works well for you most of the time, but it's normal to have to adjust this for shots with strage or difficult lighting situations..

The histogram feature in the 40D shows all three color channels. You should be able to use this to see if the exposure the camera is selecting is over/under where you want it to be..

If it's the DOF that's at issue then using Av mode (plus the exposure compensation) and dealing with the aperture yourself is certainly an option...

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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