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Making panorama pictures with vertical shots or horizontal shots? Also some HDR Ques.
Which method would you guys do? It seems to me that most people shoot horizontally as I'm assuming it's probably the easier method. The vertical shots would probably give the best view when it's done properly. Am I correct with this assessment?.

Also, would you guys recommend using HDR with panoramas? I was hoping to use the G9 in auto bracket mode and produce an HDR panorama. I was thinking of shooting horizontally with this method to reduce the number of files and complexity of it..

What do you guys think about making 360 degrees picture? Panorama Maker Pro have the ability to make such pictures and it would be pretty cool to do, but I'm not sure if it's very practical to do..

Final thing and that is if I shoot in RAW, should I do the stiching in RAW as well? Or save the RAW files for archival purposes and just stich the converted JPEGS?..

Comments (13)

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

Which method would you guys do? It seems to me that most people shoothorizontally as I'm assuming it's probably the easier method. Thevertical shots would probably give the best view when it's doneproperly. Am I correct with this assessment?.

I guess it depends on whether you have a preference for what ratio the final image is in. There is an argument that you get more information in total if you shoot lots of vertical shots for a pano. I also wonder if you'd see less shift problem with a vertical as each "slice" of the photo will encompass less of an rotational axis (if this makes any sense!)..

I'd agree that the vertical approach would give the best view - but you'll have to take lots more shots to get the total pano...so as long as you're prepared to put in the work!.

Also, would you guys recommend using HDR with panoramas? I was hopingto use the G9 in auto bracket mode and produce an HDR panorama. I wasthinking of shooting horizontally with this method to reduce thenumber of files and complexity of it..

As you identify, it's going to make it very complex and you'll have to keep a good track on what photo is what. In post you'll have to make the HDR image of each pano "slice" from the two or three you've taken and then blend all those pp'd slices together. Lots of work!.

What do you guys think about making 360 degrees picture? PanoramaMaker Pro have the ability to make such pictures and it would bepretty cool to do, but I'm not sure if it's very practical to do..

From the 360 panos I've seen, these only really work if you display them in some animated form online..

Final thing and that is if I shoot in RAW, should I do the stichingin RAW as well? Or save the RAW files for archival purposes and juststich the converted JPEGS?.

I'd think you'd want to preserve as much quality as possible and therefore keeping the image in RAW as long as possible would be preferable. Then again, it's going to be processor and memory hungry if you've got lots of images in RAW, all open in photoshop - so you might find working with the jpgs is more sensible..

Cheers - BT..

Comment #1

Not all stitching software works directly from raw. Also, you may want to keep more resolution than .jpg until you are finished with post processing and ready to display..

My workflow is like this:.

Backup the raw filesConvert to raw to 16 bit tiffStitch the 16 bit tiff to 16 bit tiff with PTGuiPost process the stitched images (I use PWP)Convert to jpgBackup the jpg.

(I also backup the first stitched tiffs but that may be excessive. They are big, but easier to go back to for cropping and reprocessing than having to stitch again. YMMV)Delete the intermediate tiffs..

On wide images with extreme range in light I prefer to have the full dynamic range available from the raw images. For example, in a mountain sunrise panorama, the peaks on one end of the panorama may be side or back lit and the other end may be front lit with snow. Making this look reasonable on a single piece (roll) of paper in constant room light can require a wide range of adjustment. Here is an example of that type of situation, be careful, it's big, it's been reduced, but it started as 28737x1669http://dbdimages.smugmug.com/photos/71166942-O.jpg.

For more evenly lit scenes, 8 bit files can provide perfectly acceptable images and are a lot easier to handle. The best way for you to learn is to shoot some pictures and try it and see..

Good Luck!.

Dale B. Dalrymplehttp://dbdimages.comhttp://stores.lulu.com/dbd..

Comment #2

Big Tom wrote:.

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

Which method would you guys do? It seems to me that most people shoothorizontally as I'm assuming it's probably the easier method. Thevertical shots would probably give the best view when it's doneproperly. Am I correct with this assessment?.

I guess it depends on whether you have a preference for what ratiothe final image is in. There is an argument that you get moreinformation in total if you shoot lots of vertical shots for a pano.I also wonder if you'd see less shift problem with a vertical as each"slice" of the photo will encompass less of an rotational axis (ifthis makes any sense!)..

I'd agree that the vertical approach would give the best view - butyou'll have to take lots more shots to get the total pano...so aslong as you're prepared to put in the work!.

Also, would you guys recommend using HDR with panoramas? I was hopingto use the G9 in auto bracket mode and produce an HDR panorama. I wasthinking of shooting horizontally with this method to reduce thenumber of files and complexity of it..

As you identify, it's going to make it very complex and you'll haveto keep a good track on what photo is what. In post you'll have tomake the HDR image of each pano "slice" from the two or three you'vetaken and then blend all those pp'd slices together. Lots of work!.

What do you guys think about making 360 degrees picture? PanoramaMaker Pro have the ability to make such pictures and it would bepretty cool to do, but I'm not sure if it's very practical to do..

From the 360 panos I've seen, these only really work if you displaythem in some animated form online..

Final thing and that is if I shoot in RAW, should I do the stichingin RAW as well? Or save the RAW files for archival purposes and juststich the converted JPEGS?.

I'd think you'd want to preserve as much quality as possible andtherefore keeping the image in RAW as long as possible would bepreferable. Then again, it's going to be processor and memory hungryif you've got lots of images in RAW, all open in photoshop - so youmight find working with the jpgs is more sensible..

Cheers - BT.

BBC's website have 360 degrees pano. However, you need QT to view it. Do I need to use a program like that?..

Comment #3

When making panoramas you should be shooting vertical. the reason is that when the final image appears all the subimages tend to make a hotdog shaped panorama. the can be counteracted by shooting vertical. there is also a hotdog appearance that gets stronger when you go up numerically in lenses from 20-35-50-100mm. the higher the lens the more the vertical comes down and the wider the image gets..

This can be counteracted by shooting more than 1 row horizontially. you can have 2 or 3 or 4 rows going across. the problem is that this get complicated fast. the shooting diffficulty goes up in a hurry. you have to be dead on level with a tripod..

If you shooting hdr to make a panoramas then you have to make the hdr first then put them together with a stitching software. the image size is mammoth..

There is a way around this and that is to use a panorama maker that can take the unmade hdr shots directly and make them into the finished panorama. I am speaking of the new PTGui PRO software. it is expensive but it has capabilities that the rest, that I know of do not. it can make 360degree panoramas, for which you need a special viewer made by a maker to see it. BUT PTGui PRO can also make 720degree panoramas (which have to be of unbeiveable mb size), and I do not of anything that will make that other than PTGuiPRO..

Do you shoot the panorama in raw? part of the reason anyone shoots in is the better pic you supposedly get. but with a panorama shot vertically you end up with such a large file in terms of pixels and mbs that do you really gain anything that you can see in a print? also if you shoot a 360degree view then that has to be seen on a monitor only which means that you are now talking about the limits of the monitors resolution is a normal view not 100% or anything like that..

Personally, I shoot just shoot the panoramas in jpeg and let the extreme size give the resolution. below made with 7 vertical shots..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #4

It can make 360degree panoramas, for which you need a special.

Viewer made by a maker to see it. BUT PTGui PRO can also make720degree panoramas (which have to be of unbeiveable mb size), and ido not of anything that will make that other than PTGuiPRO..

I might be being a bit daft, but what is the point of a 720 pano? Surely in effect a 360 degree pano is effectively "infinite" in that once you've viewed one rotation, by definition you're back at the start point again and can keep going round?.

Cheers - BT..

Comment #5

To me the idea is mind boggeling, a 720degree panorama. what it is is simple a SPHERE. so that from the center of the sphere you can use viewing software to see not only a circle horizontally but you can swing it and see a circle vertically, OR ANY OTHER POINT IN THE SPHERE. PTGuiPRO can do this. the result must be the biggest image file in the world. and you would need a computer to match.



I do not know of any software that is like PTGuiPRO. I will say it is expensive for the pro version. to me the csx, panorama maker, serifpanoramaplus3, and panorama factory cannot do it. I have all but panorama maker though I did look at it before I got PTGuiPRO...

Comment #6

Ah ha! I get it now...thinking too two-dimensionally!.

Cheers- BT..

Comment #7

I think 720 degrees is simply way too much. I'll probably do a 360 degree pano and that would be it. Does anyone here know what kind of format 360 degree pano are saved in?..

Comment #8

They play on quicktime, whatever format that is..

I am with you; why would anyone make a 720degree panorama?.

But if anyone is interested-http://www.nearfield.com/~dan/photo/wide/sphere/sphere2/index.htmhttp://www.lightspacewater.net/Tutorials/PhotoPano2/paper/..

Comment #9

For viewing in web you can use instead of Quicktime also Java based Pure Player from Immervision or Flash.http://www.immervision.com/en/multimedia/index.php..

Comment #10

Ormart wrote:.

For viewing in web you can use instead of Quicktime also Java basedPure Player from Immervision or Flash.http://www.immervision.com/en/multimedia/index.php.

Is the format dependent on what program I use to process the pictures? If so, what format does Panorama Maker uses for 360 degrees pano?.

This is starting to sound like a lot of work. Maybe I'll stick to traditional panos then...

Comment #11

I almost always shoot vertical, to get a better width/height ratio..

It also makes life easier for the stitching software, because stitching of moving clouds or blue sky is nearly impossible. With a vertical image you ensure there is something of a subject present in the lower part of the frame..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Aletsch Glacier in Switserland, 47 vertical images at 35 mm focal length, stitched with PTGui V7.

Regards,.

Fred Kamphueshttp://www.millhouse.nl/digitalpanorama.html..

Comment #12

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