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Macro 1:1 vs 1:7
Can somone post some pictures to illustrate the difference (of the same subject if possible) between 1:1 and other ratios like 1:7? I know macro lenses capable of 1:1 are typically more expensive but I wanted to understand the difference by looking at some sample pics. Thanks again!Corona_Drinker..

Comments (7)

A 1:1 macro lens will get you much closer to your subject than a 1:7 macro lens..

1:1 means that the subject will be the same size on a 35mm negative than it is in real life..

A 35 mm negative is 26 mm x 34 mm. So if you take a photo of a 15 mm object, it means that it will be 15 mm on the negative. So it takes almost half the space on the negative. So it will fill half the photo when it will be enlarged. If you enlarge this negative to 8 x 12 inches, for example, the object would be around 5 inches..

A 1:7 lens means that the subject on the negative will be 7 times smaller than in real life..

I hope this is not a too technical explaination, but what is important to remember is that a 1:1 lens will allow you to get much closer to the subject than a 1:7 lens. In fact, 7 times closer..

Claude Carrier..

Comment #1

1:1 macro doesn't have anything to do with 35mm film, unless you are shooting with 35mm film..

1:1 macro means the object is life size on the imaging sensor/film, be it a tiny 1.1/8" CCD in a digicam or on a sheet of 4x5 film..

1:7 is not macro, not even close. That ratio means the object is 1/7th life size on the imaging sensor/film..

Crime Scene PhotographyA small gallery of personal work: http://picasaweb.google.com/PID885..

Comment #2

Caoedhen wrote:.

1:1 macro doesn't have anything to do with 35mm film, unless you areshooting with 35mm film..

1:1 macro means the object is life size on the imaging sensor/film,be it a tiny 1.1/8" CCD in a digicam or on a sheet of 4x5 film..

All true..

1:7 is not macro, not even close. That ratio means the object is1/7th life size on the imaging sensor/film..

If the sensor is small, say 1/2.5", then that is macro. You'll get an image approximately 40x30mm. That's better than "macro" mode on most digicams..

Seen in a fortune cookie:Fear is the darkroom where negatives are developed..

Comment #3

Nickleback wrote:.

1:7 is not macro, not even close. That ratio means the object is1/7th life size on the imaging sensor/film..

If the sensor is small, say 1/2.5", then that is macro. You'll getan image approximately 40x30mm. That's better than "macro" mode onmost digicams..

I must be in extra dense mode today, because I don't follow what you are saying here. That is unusual for one of your posts, they are normally pretty clear..

Crime Scene PhotographyA small gallery of personal work: http://picasaweb.google.com/PID885..

Comment #4

Caoedhen wrote:.

Nickleback wrote:.

1:7 is not macro, not even close. That ratio means the object is1/7th life size on the imaging sensor/film..

If the sensor is small, say 1/2.5", then that is macro. You'll getan image approximately 40x30mm. That's better than "macro" mode onmost digicams..

I must be in extra dense mode today, because I don't follow what youare saying here. That is unusual for one of your posts, they arenormally pretty clear..

A 1/2.5" sensor is 5.76x4.29mm..

"Macro" mode on a typical 1/2.5" digicam lets you capture a subject as small as 40x30mm..

40/5.76 ~= 7.

Therefore macro mode on 1/2.5" sensor that can capture 40x30mm is giving you 1:7 max magnification..

Here's one example of a 1/2.5" sensor digicam that captures 44x33mm (i.e. around 1:7.6) at closest focus, and it's called "pretty good for a camera in this class":.

Http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonyw80/page4.asp.

Another example? The S5 IS yields magnification of 1:16.1 and 1:14.2 at wide and telephoto macro, and 1:3.6 in "super macro" mode..

Http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons5is/page5.asp.

Seen in a fortune cookie:Fear is the darkroom where negatives are developed..

Comment #5

Nickleback wrote:.

Caoedhen wrote:.

Nickleback wrote:.

1:7 is not macro, not even close. That ratio means the object is1/7th life size on the imaging sensor/film..

If the sensor is small, say 1/2.5", then that is macro. You'll getan image approximately 40x30mm. That's better than "macro" mode onmost digicams..

I must be in extra dense mode today, because I don't follow what youare saying here. That is unusual for one of your posts, they arenormally pretty clear..

A 1/2.5" sensor is 5.76x4.29mm..

"Macro" mode on a typical 1/2.5" digicam lets you capture a subjectas small as 40x30mm..

40/5.76 ~= 7.

Therefore macro mode on 1/2.5" sensor that can capture 40x30mm isgiving you 1:7 max magnification..

Here's one example of a 1/2.5" sensor digicam that captures 44x33mm(i.e. around 1:7.6) at closest focus, and it's called "pretty goodfor a camera in this class":.

Http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonyw80/page4.asp.

Another example? The S5 IS yields magnification of 1:16.1 and 1:14.2at wide and telephoto macro, and 1:3.6 in "super macro" mode..

Http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons5is/page5.asp.

Seen in a fortune cookie:Fear is the darkroom where negatives are developed.

Back a few posts, Caoedhen gave the traditional definition of macro, which starts at 1:1 imaging. I think that digital cameras have destroyed the usefulness of that definition. In the old days, we used to actually see the negatives, so 1:1 was a concept that we could grab onto. Now, we put images on sensors of some size or other and blow them up some large unknown amount. The actual size of the image on the sensor is not relevant or even easy to determine..

That's where nickelback is coming from. Today, macro is whatever fills the sensor with a 1" object (say). That would, in fact, be a useful spec. Rather than saying 1:1 or (even more useless) "focuses to 10mm from the lens", you could have a minimum field spec like "focuses to cover 40mm X 30mm"..

Leonard Migliore..

Comment #6

With a 1:1 lens .... you can take a photo of something approximately 1.5" (with a FF sensor)..

With a 1:7 lens .... the smallest item you can get full frame is about 10"..

NOTE .... that is with FF (35mm film) size sensor..

With a SMALLER size sensor .... you can take photos of even SMALLER items in both cases .... but the "proportion" stays the same..

So a 1:1 allows photos of items 1/7 the size..

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #7

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