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Looking to buy my first SLR
Hello All....

I know that a lot of people ask the same question, so thanks in advance for your patient....

I have been using point and shoot for several years, I know some terms, so it is really hard for me to know which camera will work as my starter SLR..

I'm looking for the following.

- Take pictures to landscapes (lakes, trees, plants, flowers...).

- Take maybe two pictures per seconds (I like to shoot several times the same scene some times I just make only one goood picture from a moment,like friends laughing, animals moving) some times I just want to keep clicking the shoot button..

- Take pictures of animals or objects in movement. (birds flying, cars moving, people walking..

- Take pictures with zoom (maybe 20x or more) some time with the target in move. (I get those kind of picture usually blur).

I don't know if I need some SLR with build-in stabilizer, or just one extra lens with the stabilizer..

I think the Canon's are bestselling in amazon, but Nikon, Sony and Olympus have great feed back to.....

I'm kind of lost with all those options....

Any help will be really appreciated.

Thanks in advance.....

Comments (16)

Depends on your budget. Don't spend too juch on your first dSLR. I'd go with the Pentax K100D if your happy withe the built in IS or the Nikon D40 if you want the option of faster telephoto zoom VR...

Comment #1

Olympus E510/(520 soon) has a 2x crop factor..for long tele shots (birds flying) the Oly will give a little more reach. There are more Len's available now and the OLy 70-300 (140-600) is quite a good performer from the things said by owners..And not too expensive (because it is F/4-6.3). Also Sigma makes some LONG ZOOMS one popular one is the "The BIGMA" 50-500 (100-1000) in the 4/3rds mount too. (Buy a tripod with the lens!@!).

Just another option...Body has built in IS as the with the Pentax and Sony/KM..

Bodies are upgradeable every few years...SO, look at the len's you may want from each brand...Canon has some great and expensive FAST Long Zooms and Primes, Nikon may have a better variety of more common zooms with VR...Canon IS Len's are not as plentiful..but growing.Peter .

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Enjoy your photography images, even if your wife doesn't ! ;-(http://laurence-photography.com/http://www.pbase.com/peterarbib/Cameras in profile...

Comment #2

I have a Pentax K100D with built in anti-shake. The kit lens is first class, possibly the best amongst all the brands. I tested it against the Nikon D40 before buying and found the handling just right and the build quality top notch. It's not waether sealed but you wouldn't expect it at entry level, even then the build quality is quite impressive (better than any of the others). Either way I'd probably start with the least investment possible and suggest either of these as your starting point..

Being unbised though, the Canon and Nikon lenses are more extensive and the body is consdered a consumable. Once you invest in lenses you'll need to stick with that manufacturer and so you might want to approach it that way and look at lenses first and foremost. The Pentax cameras do allow more legacy lenses though, you'll have to accept manual focus but you can get f/1.7 prime lenses (in good condition) for as little as 30 (50$). It all depends on whether you anticipate going professional, in which case Canon or Nikon would be most suitable..

The built in anti-shake on the Pentax means that any lens you attach (digital or otherwise) will have that benefit. With the others you'll have to invest in specific lenses which will cost considerably more, although with longet telephoto lenses will get appreciably better perrformance. I hope you consider this a balanced opinion and wish you good luck in your search...

Comment #3

Hi Victor,.

I think all the manufacturers you cite have a product engineered to appeal to you..

Rather than try to promote a particular manufacturer, I'd rather promote your neighborhood: local schools and local photography supply shops..

In my city, the University of Washington has something called "UW Experimental college." W/o needing to apply to the University, anyone can register and take a course offered at the Experimental College..

Here's an example: this UW Experimental College course introduces students to the basics of digital photography:.

Http://depts.washington.edu/...=courses&category=Photography&num=2508.

This course is a four-hour commitment and, if you select a similar, yet appropriate course you walk away smarter..

Perhaps you can find something like this in your home town..

I'd also encourage you to stop by the local photography shops, too; not necessarily the big chains. I prefer independant shops, but that's me..

Anyway, you're looking for someone that will listen to how you use your point-n-shoot, ask what you like about using your point-n-shoot, what you like about the pictures, what you dislike about using it and what you dislike about the results, ask why you want to upgrade, ask about your budget and then find an appropriate product..

Camera manufacturers want your loyalty..

They make engineering trade-offs for reasons of economics. Some trade-offs promote your particular habits, promote your style... some trade-offs will be in conflict..

I just think that if it's possible, reach out to the neighborhood to help you make make an educated choice..

In the next phase of your photography, I wish you all the best..

-Jon..

Comment #4

You can say all of the same about the Olympus options with the e420(IS only if using IS lenses from leica) or the e510(in body IS) the difference lies in the fact that the Olympus kit lenses are actually the best kit lenses going for a while now..

All the brands have their strengths/weakness.

Canon - great high ISOnikon - great flash systemOlympus - great lensespentax - good prime lens selectionsony - ? not familiar enough with to say.

Best advice is to go to a shop and buy what feels good in your hand and fits your budget. get yourself the most mp you can afford to stay current as long as possible, the features you think you want and the best kit lenses to get you started with as you will probably be using those for a while as you learn what you might need to add next. pick a budget and stick to it and don't feel bad if you find yourself liking an Oly, pentax or sony and not a canon or nikon like the salesman will try to sell you more often than not as any of them will give great images with a little time invested in them to learn..

Let your hands and budget be your guide..

Good luck....

One other point I'd argue for when looking is in body IS for a beginner as it greatly simplifies lens selection in the future and cost as in lens IS adds from 30-40% premium over non IS lenses and that ongoing expense seems quite silly to me over time to incur. buying it once in body to me makes the most sense and keeps money in my pocket over time to upgrade lenses, add flashes, etc...

Other opinions may vary but that's my $.02 on the matter as you can't really go to far wrong with any of them...

Comment #5

Victor Ochoa wrote:.

Hello All....

I know that a lot of people ask the same question, so thanks inadvance for your patient....

I have been using point and shoot for several years, I know someterms, so it is really hard for me to know which camera will work asmy starter SLR..

I'm looking for the following.

- Take pictures to landscapes (lakes, trees, plants, flowers...)- Take maybe two pictures per seconds (I like to shoot several timesthe same scene some times I just make only one goood picture from amoment,like friends laughing, animals moving) some times I just wantto keep clicking the shoot button.- Take pictures of animals or objects in movement. (birds flying,cars moving, people walking.- Take pictures with zoom (maybe 20x or more) some time with thetarget in move. (I get those kind of picture usually blur).

All of the manufacturers offer choices which will meet your requirementsw..

I don't know if I need some SLR with build-in stabilizer, or just oneextra lens with the stabilizer..

I think the Canon's are bestselling in amazon, but Nikon, Sony andOlympus have great feed back to.....

Canon had 47.2% of the global dSLR market in 2007Nikon was second with 40%Sony was third with around 6%Olympus was fourth also with around 6%Pentax was fifth with less than 6%.

Nikon's pace has them ready to outstrip Canon this year in terms of global market share, most of the gains having been made in the entry-level end of the market..

The market is growing, so everyone's doing fairly well, though there's no telling what a multi-country recession will do to the marginal player's going forward..

I'm kind of lost with all those options....

Any help will be really appreciated.

Thanks in advance....

If you go with Canon or Nikon, then you'll have more body options moving forward should you decide to get more serious about the hobby or turn it into a part or full-time career. If you know it's just going to be a hobby, then that's not a factor unless you want a particular thing like the ability to go to a full-frame sensor, in which case Canon, Nikon and Sony will be the most likely choices moving forward..

If you go with any of the "also rans" then you'll get more features in the entry-level bodies. If you go with a 4/3rds system, you'll lose about a stop's worth of latitude from sensor noise compared to a similar resolution 1.5 or 1.6x sensor due to physics- only a real consideration if you're going to shoot in low light. Smaller sensors have more depth of field, an advantage if you want more in focus, a disadvantage if you want subject isolation. Smaller sensors reach diffraction limits sooner (at wider apertures) for the same number of megapixels, this is somewhat offset by the DoF differences, but may be an issue for bright-light shooting - like daylight outdoors with no shade (or for instance, my head and pack studio lighting can provide challenges in this regard, whereas my monolight setup has more versatility and I can pick my aperture from a much wider range.) You can add ND filters to offset this, but it's a limitation for some folks..

Pentax has the best backwards lens compatibility, followed by Nikon, though the entry level Nikon bodies won't autofocus with lots of older lens designs. If you're looking to buy used glass or wide primes, then this is a drawback. Nikon's kit lenses are very good though, so if you're getting a kit and don't plan on buying old glass, this offsets the disadvantage..

Sony won't repair any Konica/Minolta lenses- so although they fit, if they break you're at a disadvantage..

If you have a stocking camera store nearby, it's worth handling the options and seeing which ones are more comfortable- though the current body is temporary manufacturers tend to do similar ergonomics in all their bodies..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #6

Paul Robertson wrote:.

Victor Ochoa wrote:.

Hello All....

I know that a lot of people ask the same question, so thanks inadvance for your patient....

I have been using point and shoot for several years, I know someterms, so it is really hard for me to know which camera will work asmy starter SLR..

I'm looking for the following.

- Take pictures to landscapes (lakes, trees, plants, flowers...)- Take maybe two pictures per seconds (I like to shoot several timesthe same scene some times I just make only one goood picture from amoment,like friends laughing, animals moving) some times I just wantto keep clicking the shoot button.- Take pictures of animals or objects in movement. (birds flying,cars moving, people walking.- Take pictures with zoom (maybe 20x or more) some time with thetarget in move. (I get those kind of picture usually blur).

All of the manufacturers offer choices which will meet yourrequirementsw..

I don't know if I need some SLR with build-in stabilizer, or just oneextra lens with the stabilizer..

I think the Canon's are bestselling in amazon, but Nikon, Sony andOlympus have great feed back to.....

Canon had 47.2% of the global dSLR market in 2007Nikon was second with 40%Sony was third with around 6%Olympus was fourth also with around 6%Pentax was fifth with less than 6%.

Wow Canon have dropped that much?...they must be worried..

Nikon's pace has them ready to outstrip Canon this year in terms ofglobal market share, most of the gains having been made in theentry-level end of the market..

The market is growing, so everyone's doing fairly well, thoughthere's no telling what a multi-country recession will do to themarginal player's going forward..

Lets see...Pentax and Oly where both founded in 1919...they have been through the great depression and every recession since. Pentax ceased to exist in march this year and Pentax is now a division of the much larger Hoya Corporation via a takeover...in any case the even larger (I think) Samsung has partnered with them and are producing cameras with Pentax mount..

Minolta merged with Konica and then Sony, but they had some problems, including a large legal settlement I believe....in any event Sony is not going to go away and I would not be surprised to see them second in 3 or 4 years..

It will only take one camera from ANYONE...or more likely a new photographic device different from a dslr...even someone like Casio...and the market would be on it's ear....

Any help will be really appreciated.

Thanks in advance....

If you go with Canon or Nikon, then you'll have more body optionsmoving forward should you decide to get more serious about the hobbyor turn it into a part or full-time career. If you know it's justgoing to be a hobby, then that's not a factor unless you want aparticular thing like the ability to go to a full-frame sensor, inwhich case Canon, Nikon and Sony will be the most likely choicesmoving forward..

UMM Not more than Sony ...they have more than anyone right now, and more to come in future..

There are pros using cameras from all brands, though , yes for pro grade cameras the choice TODAY is Nikon or Canon and Oly , with Sony soon....for semi- pro then all brands have something...same with entry level, it really depends on needs..

If you go with any of the "also rans" then you'll get more featuresin the entry-level bodies. If you go with a 4/3rds system, you'lllose about a stop's worth of latitude from sensor noise compared to asimilar resolution 1.5 or 1.6x sensor due to physics- only a realconsideration if you're going to shoot in low light. Smaller sensorshave more depth of field, an advantage if you want more in focus, adisadvantage if you want subject isolation. Smaller sensors reachdiffraction limits sooner (at wider apertures) for the same number ofmegapixels, this is somewhat offset by the DoF differences, but maybe an issue for bright-light shooting - like daylight outdoors withno shade (or for instance, my head and pack studio lighting canprovide challenges in this regard, whereas my monolight setup hasmore versatility and I can pick my aperture from a much wider range.)You can add ND filters to offset this, but it's a limitation for somefolks..

If they where also rans they would not be as good...clearly they are and all cameras have there strengths and weaknesses..

Pentax has the best backwards lens compatibility, followed by Nikon,though the entry level Nikon bodies won't autofocus with lots ofolder lens designs. If you're looking to buy used glass or wideprimes, then this is a drawback. Nikon's kit lenses are very goodthough, so if you're getting a kit and don't plan on buying oldglass, this offsets the disadvantage..

Sony won't repair any Konica/Minolta lenses- so although they fit, ifthey break you're at a disadvantage..

Will Canon or Nikon repair lenses as old as the Minolta ones?...maybe some but certainly not all..

If you have a stocking camera store nearby, it's worth handling theoptions and seeing which ones are more comfortable- though thecurrent body is temporary manufacturers tend to do similar ergonomicsin all their bodies..

People may find the camera they like on paper hurts their hand/finger etc. Try as many as you cam and get what is right for you. All brands make fine cameras these days so it should come down to what feels right and what specifics you need..

Neil..

Comment #7

Ok so they do not quite have more cameras than Nikon or Canon....yet..

Neil..

Comment #8

Victor Ochoa wrote:.

- Take pictures to landscapes (lakes, trees, plants, flowers...).

Any DSLR will do this..

- Take maybe two pictures per seconds.

Any DSLR will do this. Even the low-end ones have 2.5 frame per second burst rate shooting (something that used to be a high-end feature on film SLRs)..

- Take pictures of animals or objects in movement. (birds flying,cars moving, people walking..

Taking good pictures of birds in flight may require special lenses: long telephoto lenses, maybe long telephoto lenses that are also reasonably "fast". But even a budget DSLR body (that is compatible with the appropriate lens) will do..

- Take pictures with zoom (maybe 20x or more) some time with thetarget in move. (I get those kind of picture usually blur).

20x is a lot of range that would be, say 35mm to 700mm, or 28mm to 560mm. You're not going to get that with just one lens. At the telephoto end, you will need some sort of stabilization (tripod, IS/VR) to minimize blur from hand shake and you wil need high shutter speeds to freeze subject motion...

Comment #9

Neil holmes wrote:.

Sony won't repair any Konica/Minolta lenses- so although they fit, ifthey break you're at a disadvantage..

Will Canon or Nikon repair lenses as old as the Minolta ones?...maybesome but certainly not all.neil.

Yes, Nikon will fix lenses going back farther than that as long as parts exist. Nikon lenses going back to 1959 will mount with little modification to any Nikon SLR today. D40-D60 has no limitations. D80-D3 require a $25-$35 modificaton to a lens older than 1977. I regularly use a 1973 55 f3.5 Micro on my D300. I had it cleaned a little while ago at a Nikon service center..

The only lenses that won't fit are a couple of weird and rare fisheyes that protrude back into the mirror box from the mid-1960s..

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Comment #10

Any one of a dozen dSLRs will be more than adequate for what you want..

The scenarios you describe could also be handled by something like the Panasonic FZ50, and for a much cheaper zoom versus dollar ratio:.

Http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz50/.

Cheers ..

Comment #11

I just want to clarify a few things for you, considering you do buy a DSLR..

First of all, reading your post, I think the most important thing to consider are lenses, not bodies..

Any new DSLR will give you great results. I use Canon, but have friends with Nikon who get great shots. Pick one that feels good. They all pretty much have the same features and will all do almost the same things..

Some people I have heard will base their purchase on the kit lens that comes with a body. That may be OK for now. The new Canon XSi/450D has a good kit lens, but the previous ones on the entry level cameras weren't as nice. Don't know about others, but kit lenses tend to be so-so all around..

Let me comment on a few of your questions:.

Victor Ochoa wrote:.

I'm looking for the following.

- Take pictures to landscapes (lakes, trees, plants, flowers...).

Most people will use a wide angle lens for large landscapes, but if you want close ups of plants and flowers, a macro lens is your best bet. You can get close and get a nice depth of field.

- Take maybe two pictures per seconds (I like to shoot several timesthe same scene some times I just make only one goood picture from amoment,like friends laughing, animals moving) some times I just wantto keep clicking the shoot button..

I think any newer DSLR will do at least 3 fps..

- Take pictures of animals or objects in movement. (birds flying,cars moving, people walking..

Here you need shutter speed if you want to freeze action. You need a fast lens and/or a camera that operates well at high ISO. Canon cameras excel at high ISO, giving very clean images..

When it comes to lenses, the f-stop number is important to look at. The lower the number, the more light the lens will allow in. This is important when you need high shutter speeds. You have probably noticed that in low light situations, your camera's shutter speed slows down to let in more light..

If you have a lens that will let in more light, the camera can keep a higher shutter speed. Lenses that have f/2.8 or better are fast and let in lots of light, so you can use faster shutter speeds. They also get more expensive, generally speaking..

Cheap zoom lenses often have f/5.6 or higher at the long end. This is two stops slower than f/2.8. How do I put this simply?.

Say you're taking a picture of a bird and your lens focal length is 100mm.Say that your lens only has a minimum aperture of f/5.6 at 100mm..

Say your camera's meter says you need a 1/30 shutter speed to properly expose this shot at f/5.6.You are probably going to get motion blur..

Here is how a larger aperture (smaller f-stop) helps:.

Every stop up (smaller f-number- I know that is confusing) gives you twice as much light. So to use the above example, here is what you would get in order to have proper exposure at different apertures:.

100mm, f/5.6, 1/30100mm, f/4, 1/60100mm, f 2.8 1/120.

Each stop opens the lens wider to let in twice as much light..

If you want less blur, obviously the higher shutter speed is going to give it to you. This doesn't really have anything to do with the camera body (I'm not going to confuse you with ISO settings right now). Keep this in mind when buying lenses..

This is a decent explanation of aperture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aperture.

- Take pictures with zoom (maybe 20x or more) some time with thetarget in move. (I get those kind of picture usually blur).

20x zoom does not mean anything in the SLR world. All it means is that the longest length of the lens is 20 times longer than the widest length..

I SLR terms that would mean at the wide end you might have something like 18mm and at the long end you would need to have 360mm. (18 x 20 = 360).

I know Nikon puts an 18-135 zoom as one possible kit lens. Canon usually 18-55. Don't know about the others..

Usually though, super zooms suffer from image quality problems. That's a generalization and there are probably some that are great..

I don't know if I need some SLR with build-in stabilizer, or just oneextra lens with the stabilizer..

Good question. But realize that stabilization will not stop blur from the object's motion. It only helps you stead the camera. If you take a picture of a bird flying, you will get no help from image stabilization..

The camera's ability to focus on a moving object is important here, especially if it is moving toward or away from you. Look at the camera's servo focusing ability..

I think the Canon's are bestselling in amazon, but Nikon, Sony andOlympus have great feed back to.....

I'm kind of lost with all those options....

Any help will be really appreciated.

Thanks in advance....

Hopefully I didn't confuse you even more..

Find a camera you like to hold and that feels good. Then buy the best lens you can afford. That's the short answer..

I don't know anything about photography. I just like to press the shutter button and hear that sound...

Comment #12

Neil holmes wrote:.

Canon had 47.2% of the global dSLR market in 2007Nikon was second with 40%Sony was third with around 6%Olympus was fourth also with around 6%Pentax was fifth with less than 6%.

Wow Canon have dropped that much?...they must be worried..

If they're really worried, we'll see a price war at the low end, which is where Nikon has most of it's growth- that's not going to be good for the lower tier..

The market is growing, so everyone's doing fairly well, thoughthere's no telling what a multi-country recession will do to themarginal player's going forward..

Lets see...Pentax and Oly where both founded in 1919...they have beenthrough the great depression and every recession since. Pentax.

We really haven't had a globally significant recession though. While the US remains the largest dSLR market, that's changing..

Ceased to exist in march this year and Pentax is now a division ofthe much larger Hoya Corporation via a takeover...in any case theeven larger (I think) Samsung has partnered with them and areproducing cameras with Pentax mount..

Minolta merged with Konica and then Sony, but they had some problems,including a large legal settlement I believe....in any event Sony isnot going to go away and I would not be surprised to see them secondin 3 or 4 years..

Which doesn't address capital for R&D and products going forward, let alone profit margins for shareholders..

Sony's ditching a lot of legacy product lines to keep the numbers good- there's no telling what they'll do long-term- especially if that business unit doesn't do well. They purchased #3, they want double-digit market share, but there's no telling if it's achievable even in an up market. K/M probably wouldn't have been acquired by Sony if they'd been doing well..

Contax/Yashika was around for a long time too- what's Kyocera doing these days in terms of cameras? Contax went from 1932-2005, had a great Zeiss relationship and still bagged it..

Olympus has done a massive turn around in the last few years, coming back from the brink of financial disaster. One of the few companies to do so on the rising tide of digital cameras..

It will only take one camera from ANYONE...or more likely a newphotographic device different from a dslr...even someone likeCasio...and the market would be on it's ear....

Nope, even the interesting laser-based cell phone camera R&D that's going on won't turn the dSLR market on it's ear anytime soon. The only thing something iPod-like could do is hasten the market saturation. In that case, Canon and Nikon will fare better, since they're still doing great business in the pro end of the spectrum where the margins are significantly higher and the market is not likely to shrink due to a low-end popular product..

UMM Not more than Sony ...they have more than anyone right now, andmore to come in future..

I count four dSLR bodies advertised on Sony's site- the 700, 350, 300 and 200..

I count seven dSLR bodies advertised on Nikon's site- D3, D300, D200, D80, D60, D40x and D40..

I count eight dSLR bodies advertised on Canon's site- 1Ds III, 1D III, 5D, 40D, 30D, XSi, XTi and XT..

So, I'm not sure what you're counting but in my counts, Sony's got half as many bodies..

If they where also rans they would not be as good...clearly they areand all cameras have there strengths and weaknesses..

Also rans are in terms of corporate market share- everyone outside of C/N has single-digit market shares, that makes them "also rans" in my book. When there's more than a third of the market between you and your nearest competitor, you're not in the front of the pack..

Pentax has the best backwards lens compatibility, followed by Nikon,though the entry level Nikon bodies won't autofocus with lots ofolder lens designs. If you're looking to buy used glass or wideprimes, then this is a drawback. Nikon's kit lenses are very goodthough, so if you're getting a kit and don't plan on buying oldglass, this offsets the disadvantage..

Sony won't repair any Konica/Minolta lenses- so although they fit, ifthey break you're at a disadvantage..

Will Canon or Nikon repair lenses as old as the Minolta ones?...maybesome but certainly not all..

In the case of Nikon, they'll repair most older lenses- and some are either still in production or only recently discontinued. I don't know about Canon since I don't own Canon equipment. The fact is though that you can't get a pre-Sony acquisition lens repaired by Sony there's no chance, with the others they'll repair it if they have the parts. Since many parts are interchangeable, that's an advantage..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #13

Guidenet wrote:.

Neil holmes wrote:.

Sony won't repair any Konica/Minolta lenses- so although they fit, ifthey break you're at a disadvantage..

Will Canon or Nikon repair lenses as old as the Minolta ones?...maybesome but certainly not all.neil.

Yes, Nikon will fix lenses going back farther than that as long asparts exist. Nikon lenses going back to 1959 will mount with littlemodification to any Nikon SLR today. D40-D60 has no limitations.D80-D3 require a $25-$35 modificaton to a lens older than 1977. Iregularly use a 1973 55 f3.5 Micro on my D300. I had it cleaned alittle while ago at a Nikon service center..

Ok but if they do not have the parts then no...Canon does not support many of it's older lenses...I do not think they will repair those 200 1.8 lenses that cost a mint. With all those old lenses out of guarrantee it would cost a bit and you may as well get a repair from a shop rather than the manufacturer anyway if the lens is worth getting repaired..

Interestingly while you need to modify those old Nikon lenses to mount on some Nikon dslrs and while they will mount on others without metering etc...many will mount, meter and be stabilised on a Pentax K100d..

The manual focus Nikon 85mm is one of my favourite lenses. I think that optically it is as good if not better than the newer ones and the Pentax 77 1.8 limited (though both those lenses are af and the pentax is superbly built and stabilised on a K100d) this lens cost me just under $100 ...ratty exterior great glass..

Mine had been factory ai'd and did work like that(on the pentax) but was able to be knocked of with a bump...by making it a non ai again it is great...either way it meters with focus confirmation is and stabilised..

I filed off the meter coupling rim...I should have just bought a non ai one though this was such a bargain it hardly matters..

The 85 does not lock on my camera but is a nice fit and I would be happy to take it to a crowded gig for some music shots without worry....other non ai Nikon lenses will lock on Pentax cameras...I am looking for a cheap (yeah right!) Nikon 35 1.4 non ai now..

This is with the 85 1.8 at 3/10 at f4 hand held and before I filed of the meter coupling rim..

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This was using it as an auto focus lens with the 1.7x auto focus adapter (with 1.7x increase in foacal length and slower aperture)...this was after filing..

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Neil.

Link back to flickrhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/26884588@N00/..

Comment #14

It's fun to use old lenses and a bargain as well. My D300 requires AI, but it's pretty easy to do. Now, if I could get these out in the field..

My first two cameras..

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Comment #15

Thanks a lot all of you for your advices.....

I guess I will pick a Cannon or Olympus (I already own a point and shoot from olympus, no complain).

I will search for a good lenses after being familiar with the camera.....

I have a lot to learn.....

Thanks for your time.....any further advice will be really appreciated.....

Comment #16

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